Canadian Yachting December 2017 - 32

friends on VHF, it isn't really necessary to use frequent reiterations of the traditional three-by-three call; "Leaky Tub, Leaky
Tub, Leaky Tub, this is yacht Soggy Bottom, yacht Soggy
Bottom, yacht Soggy Bottom, how do you read me?" Keep your
local VHF radio calls shorter, perhaps using only a two-by-one.
Either your friend's crew is paying attention after hearing their
own boat's name twice, or they're busy or ashore. Please wait at
least five minutes before calling them again. I don't know of any
boaters with a VHF radio mounted in their boat's head compartment for those early morning calls. Relax, give them a few
moments, and then call them again. Similarly, after an unsuccessful attempt to contact another boat, we might hear the
phrase, "Nothing heard, this is Soggy Bottom monitoring channel 16." These procedures are common practice on long distance, SSB-HF frequencies, but are quite redundant on short
range, full-quieting, FM-modulated VHF radio.
Better yet, instead of calling on 16, why not privately page
your friend's boat using the capabilities of your boat's VHF-DSC
radio. We'll discuss this cool new technique in a future article,
"Marine VHF and DSC - Don't Leave Port Without It!"
Should you ever overhear someone near your own boat being
called unsuccessfully on Ch-16, going on the air to point out
that the crew has left the boat to go shopping or take a land tour
is a great disservice. You've now advertised the name of this
vacant boat to everyone within 20 miles with a maritime VHF
radio. Similarly, making dinner plans with friends on the VHF
could very well put your vacant boat at risk. We've overheard
boaters making marina dock reservations over the radio, complete with credit card numbers. Radio is just one big party-line.
Your conversation is definitely not private. Not everyone on
VHF has honourable intentions.
RADIO CHECK
After failing to contact their party on VHF, we often hear a station calling for a "Radio Check." They've automatically assumed
that their radio or antenna is now defective since they last used
it. You'll probably agree that the chance of a complete radio system failure within half a day's time is probably very low.
Checking the operation of your radio anonymously by blowing
into the mike while tuned to a calling channel is inconsiderate
and also illegal. Please respect your neighbours and test your
radio on another vacant working channel. If you do hear "Radio

32

Canadian Yachting

Check," take them to a vacant working simplex channel, then
give them your location and an honest opinion of their signal
quality. This is much more helpful than automatically responding to every "Radio Check" with "Loud and clear," especially if
they're a bit weak or scratchy.
We've all heard the entertaining result of a boat's microphone
accidently jammed under a cushion; all the while transmitting a
complete and embarrassing play-by-play of cockpit chatter on a
calling channel. Again, clicking your mike or calling out, "Check
your microphone!" will only add to the general entertainment.
That boat can't hear anything on the radio, they're transmitting!
BREAK BREAK!
Whenever you feel the need to interrupt an ongoing VHF conversation or want to be heard on a VHF radio, simply shouting
"Break" isn't good radio etiquette. It's an artifact from the old
General Radio Service (CB) days. Saying "Break" on the radio
correctly indicates a separation between portions of your long
message. Never use the term "Break" two or three times in succession unless there is an immediate threat to life or property.
It's much better to wait for a pause between transmissions and
throw in your boat name. Incidentally, when you've finished
your conversation with someone on the radio, it's recommended
that you wait a second or two before switching back to the calling channel. It's not uncommon that someone else may have
been waiting patiently to speak with you. There's no rush after
all, is there? After all, boating is supposed to be relaxing.
CONSERVATION OF POWER AND SPECTRUM
Use Low Power. Switch your VHF radio from HIGH power (25
watts) to LOW power (1 watt) when anchored, in a marina or in
any port. It's an unfortunate idiosyncrasy of the receiving circuitry of most VHF radios that you will hear the voice of a neighbouring boat's 25 watt signal on many other channels at once.
There's nothing wrong with anyone's radio. This overloading just
happens. The use of low power for local conversations will help
prevent you from being heard by distant vessels in other boating
areas, which is a good thing, since you're only talking to a vessel
nearby. Imagine the turmoil caused, if many boats, all quite distant from one another, all try to simultaneously use the same
channel on high power. Switching to low power eliminates this
unintentional interaction and can make that channel available

DECEMBER 2017



Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of Canadian Yachting December 2017

Vantage Point: Little Boat, Big Boat – Where Did You Start?
Club Profile: Gimli Yacht Club
Galley Guys: The Galley Guys Travel to Newfoundland
Travel Destinations: The Middens of Galiano Island
Profile of a Cruising Family: Redefining the Face of Yachting in Canada
Marine Electronics: Special Feature – A Guide to Maritime VHF Radio for Pleasure Craft
Marine Electronics: Special Feature – AIS - Peering Atop Islands and Around Bends
The Port Hole
Marine Electronics: Special Feature – WiFi Boosters
Sail Review: Dehler 38
Power Review: Cruisers Yachts Cantius 50
Power Review: Jeanneau NC 895
Summer Event Coverage: Poker Run 101
Crossing the Line: Flying Dutchman
Canadian Yachting December 2017 - Cover1
Canadian Yachting December 2017 - Cover2
Canadian Yachting December 2017 - 3
Canadian Yachting December 2017 - Vantage Point: Little Boat, Big Boat – Where Did You Start?
Canadian Yachting December 2017 - 5
Canadian Yachting December 2017 - Club Profile: Gimli Yacht Club
Canadian Yachting December 2017 - 7
Canadian Yachting December 2017 - 8
Canadian Yachting December 2017 - 9
Canadian Yachting December 2017 - 10
Canadian Yachting December 2017 - 11
Canadian Yachting December 2017 - Galley Guys: The Galley Guys Travel to Newfoundland
Canadian Yachting December 2017 - 13
Canadian Yachting December 2017 - 14
Canadian Yachting December 2017 - 15
Canadian Yachting December 2017 - Travel Destinations: The Middens of Galiano Island
Canadian Yachting December 2017 - 17
Canadian Yachting December 2017 - 18
Canadian Yachting December 2017 - 19
Canadian Yachting December 2017 - 20
Canadian Yachting December 2017 - 21
Canadian Yachting December 2017 - 22
Canadian Yachting December 2017 - 23
Canadian Yachting December 2017 - Profile of a Cruising Family: Redefining the Face of Yachting in Canada
Canadian Yachting December 2017 - 25
Canadian Yachting December 2017 - 26
Canadian Yachting December 2017 - 27
Canadian Yachting December 2017 - Marine Electronics: Special Feature – A Guide to Maritime VHF Radio for Pleasure Craft
Canadian Yachting December 2017 - 29
Canadian Yachting December 2017 - 30
Canadian Yachting December 2017 - 31
Canadian Yachting December 2017 - 32
Canadian Yachting December 2017 - 33
Canadian Yachting December 2017 - 34
Canadian Yachting December 2017 - 35
Canadian Yachting December 2017 - Marine Electronics: Special Feature – AIS - Peering Atop Islands and Around Bends
Canadian Yachting December 2017 - 37
Canadian Yachting December 2017 - 38
Canadian Yachting December 2017 - The Port Hole
Canadian Yachting December 2017 - 40
Canadian Yachting December 2017 - 41
Canadian Yachting December 2017 - 42
Canadian Yachting December 2017 - 43
Canadian Yachting December 2017 - 44
Canadian Yachting December 2017 - 45
Canadian Yachting December 2017 - 46
Canadian Yachting December 2017 - 47
Canadian Yachting December 2017 - 48
Canadian Yachting December 2017 - 49
Canadian Yachting December 2017 - 50
Canadian Yachting December 2017 - 51
Canadian Yachting December 2017 - Marine Electronics: Special Feature – WiFi Boosters
Canadian Yachting December 2017 - 53
Canadian Yachting December 2017 - 54
Canadian Yachting December 2017 - 55
Canadian Yachting December 2017 - Sail Review: Dehler 38
Canadian Yachting December 2017 - 57
Canadian Yachting December 2017 - 58
Canadian Yachting December 2017 - 59
Canadian Yachting December 2017 - Power Review: Cruisers Yachts Cantius 50
Canadian Yachting December 2017 - 61
Canadian Yachting December 2017 - 62
Canadian Yachting December 2017 - 63
Canadian Yachting December 2017 - 64
Canadian Yachting December 2017 - 65
Canadian Yachting December 2017 - Power Review: Jeanneau NC 895
Canadian Yachting December 2017 - 67
Canadian Yachting December 2017 - 68
Canadian Yachting December 2017 - 69
Canadian Yachting December 2017 - 70
Canadian Yachting December 2017 - 71
Canadian Yachting December 2017 - Summer Event Coverage: Poker Run 101
Canadian Yachting December 2017 - 73
Canadian Yachting December 2017 - 74
Canadian Yachting December 2017 - 75
Canadian Yachting December 2017 - 76
Canadian Yachting December 2017 - 77
Canadian Yachting December 2017 - 78
Canadian Yachting December 2017 - 79
Canadian Yachting December 2017 - 80
Canadian Yachting December 2017 - 81
Canadian Yachting December 2017 - 82
Canadian Yachting December 2017 - 83
Canadian Yachting December 2017 - 84
Canadian Yachting December 2017 - 85
Canadian Yachting December 2017 - Crossing the Line: Flying Dutchman
Canadian Yachting December 2017 - Cover3
Canadian Yachting December 2017 - Cover4
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