Canadian Yachting June 2017 - 40

New Recent Reads Book Reviews

THE PORT HOLE

Reviewed by: R. John Garside, AP

1916 What the People Saw
Author: Mick O'Farrell
Pages: 320
Published: 2013
Publisher: Mercier Press
ISBN: 978-1-78117-150-9

No Man's Land
Author: Kevin Major
Pages: 251
Published: 1995
Publisher: Doubleday
ISBN: 0-385-25503-9

History is often written from the point of view of
the politicians and generals of the time, but the
eye on the ground, the local viewpoint, is often
lost. Mick O'Farrell's effort to reveal to us what
the people of Dublin saw with their own eyes during what is now known as the Easter Rising of
1916, is fascinating. His research into this time
period reveals a whole new look on the week that
changed Ireland forever.
Each chapter deals with one person's actual
account of the week drawn from the original letters, texts and manuscripts of the time. Many of
the stories are being told for the first time and
it gives a whole new feel for this troubled time.
One has to remember that in 1916 Britain was
at war on the continent and this uprising was not
expected, either by the standing government or
many of the locals. In fact several of the commentaries in the book reveal how insular the trouble
was and how limited real information and news
was of the uprising.
Each account is well written and very readable
and provides you with an insight into Irish urban
life in 1916. The one thing that came to the forefront for me was that as the uprising moved into
its third day many of the families had no food as
refrigeration was still not invented yet! Each day
many households travelled to the local market to
purchase the day's food supplies and this daily
practice was now very dangerous as the streets
had become a battleground between the two opposing sides.
As a student of history I highly recommend this
book not only for its inside look at the Easter Rising from the point of view of the civilians living in
the battle ground but also for the insight that it
offers into the mindset of the times.

This is an interesting piece of fiction written to
depict the days prior to July 1, 1916, of a select
body of Newfoundland troops in the trenches of
France. The story line involves a small group of
young officers and their daily actions and anxieties leading up to the fateful launch of another
"grand offensive". Each chapter of the book
reads very much like a short story filled with new
information and more insight into each of the
main characters.
Major captures the concerns and daily routines
of the men and officers as their unit slowly moves
into the front lines of France. The description of
the French countryside and local towns is very
colourful and you can often feel the dirt and the
grinding poverty of the locals. The characters are
well developed and you get a feel for their long
and short expectations concerning the war and
their future. Recall in 1916, Newfoundland was
not part of Canada but a distant colony of England, one that was costing a great deal of money
to run and administer, and the future of many of
the islanders was not full of promise.
The book takes you on an often quiet journey
of hope as the troops make their way to the front
lines and the eventual offensive. The description
of the daily routine that keeps order and morale
high as the news from the front is often exaggerated and very limited. The author keeps the book
quite taut while at the same time giving you hope
that there just might be a happy ending for some.
Each character has a very important part to play
and with each of them looking back from where
they came, where they presently are, and what
they might do in the future when the war is over,
makes for a very interesting read.

40

Canadian Yachting

June 2017

Voyages of Hope - The Saga of the
Bride-Ships
Author: Peter Johnson
Pages: 227
Published: 2002
Publisher: Touch Wood Editions
ISBN: 13:978-0-920663-79-0
Last summer I had the pleasure of exploring the
province of British Columbia, both the coastline
and the interior. It struck me how large an area the
province occupies and the vast diversity of the land,
from the mudflats of the coast to the mountains and
more. However, the province is also quite young, and
as most of you know, the opening up of the territory
was mostly due to the discovery of gold in the Fraser
River Canyon.
This resulted in a massive influx of men searching
for the precious yellow metal and the resulting network of roads and trails gradually opened up the territory to ranching and farming. However, there was
one serious problem. Though there were lots of men
about, there were no ladies for wives! So in the early
1860s it was ventured that it would be an excellent
idea to ship out a boat load of potential wives to the
new colony from the motherland.
The author tracks the collection, selection and the
voyage of two ship loads of bridal pilgrims. There
is nothing simple about the process as there is not
only politics involved but also religion and the ever
present social class restraints of the times. The ships
do make their trip and deliver their cargo and we
get to see the world from the lady's point of view.
Many are living in less than grand circumstances in
the great cities of England and are more than happy
to escape to a new beginning in the colony.
I found the book most informative, not only for
the social history of the times, but also it provides
a look into the social fabric of the far western province. The future province was very British at times,
but also a land of opportunity for many.



Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of Canadian Yachting June 2017

Vantage Point: A “Flare” for Safety
Club Profile: Sidney North Saanich Yacht Club
Pacific Northwest Classic: Southern Straits Race - For the last 49 years, the West Vancouver Yacht Club has proudly hosted the Annual Southern Straits Race. Known for offering challenging conditions, this Pacific Northwest classic is a proud qualifying event for both the VanIsle 360 and Vic-Maui Yacht Race. This year, Canadian Yachting magazine’s Bob Nicoll sailed on one of the 82 boats that competed. By Bob Nicoll
Canadian Boatbuilder Profile: Modernizing Tradition at Rossiter Boats - The history of Rossiter Boats is one that combines passion, fostering of tradition, and an eye towards the future. It all started 40 years ago with 19-year-old George Rossiter repairing the wooden canoe of a fellow cottager on Go Home Bay. Now Rossiter is perhaps Canada’s fastest-growing boatbuilder. By Kate Fincham
Cruising Technology: Staying Connected - Your summer cruise may be a vacation, but a pretty sizeable percentage of boat owners do want to keep in contact, whether for business or family reasons. In the not too distant past it was a big deal to clear your responsibilities and be able to take off for even a few weeks. However, connectivity for the average boater is improving and within the financial reach of most. By Glen Cairns
The Port Hole
Sail Review: Jeanneau 51 Yacht
Power Review: Leader 33
Trailering Part 3: Trailer Maintenance - Towing the Trailer, and Launching and Retrieving the Boat. The third and final article in our three-part series of important and useful information to help our readers travel with their boats on vacations, fishing trips or to regattas. Go safely this summer! By John Gullick
Crossing the Line: Boat or Reality – Take this simple test
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - Cover1
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - Cover2
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - Vantage Point: A “Flare” for Safety
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - 4
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - 5
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - Club Profile: Sidney North Saanich Yacht Club
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - 7
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - 8
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - 9
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - Pacific Northwest Classic: Southern Straits Race - For the last 49 years, the West Vancouver Yacht Club has proudly hosted the Annual Southern Straits Race. Known for offering challenging conditions, this Pacific Northwest classic is a proud qualifying event for both the VanIsle 360 and Vic-Maui Yacht Race. This year, Canadian Yachting magazine’s Bob Nicoll sailed on one of the 82 boats that competed. By Bob Nicoll
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - 11
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - 12
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - 13
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - Canadian Boatbuilder Profile: Modernizing Tradition at Rossiter Boats - The history of Rossiter Boats is one that combines passion, fostering of tradition, and an eye towards the future. It all started 40 years ago with 19-year-old George Rossiter repairing the wooden canoe of a fellow cottager on Go Home Bay. Now Rossiter is perhaps Canada’s fastest-growing boatbuilder. By Kate Fincham
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - 15
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - 16
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - 17
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - 18
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - 19
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - Cruising Technology: Staying Connected - Your summer cruise may be a vacation, but a pretty sizeable percentage of boat owners do want to keep in contact, whether for business or family reasons. In the not too distant past it was a big deal to clear your responsibilities and be able to take off for even a few weeks. However, connectivity for the average boater is improving and within the financial reach of most. By Glen Cairns
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - 21
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - 22
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - 23
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - 24
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - 25
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - 26
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - The Port Hole
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - 28
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - 29
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Canadian Yachting June 2017 - 45
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - 46
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - 47
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - 48
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - 49
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - Sail Review: Jeanneau 51 Yacht
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - 51
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - 52
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - 53
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - 54
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - 55
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - Power Review: Leader 33
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - 57
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - 58
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - 59
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - Trailering Part 3: Trailer Maintenance - Towing the Trailer, and Launching and Retrieving the Boat. The third and final article in our three-part series of important and useful information to help our readers travel with their boats on vacations, fishing trips or to regattas. Go safely this summer! By John Gullick
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - 61
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - 62
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - 63
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - 64
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - 65
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - 66
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Canadian Yachting June 2017 - 76
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - 77
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - Crossing the Line: Boat or Reality – Take this simple test
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - Cover3
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - Cover4
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