Canadian Yachting June 2017 - 61

SPARES AND TOOLS
Carrying a toolbox with the following items will mean that you
are always ready to take care of any minor problems:
* Hammer
* Crescent wrench
* Phillips, Slot, and Robertson screwdrivers, also
Torx if required
* Allen wrenches, SAE, and/or metric
* Adjustable pliers and "snap ring" pliers for bearing
removal and replacement
* Wire cutter, stripping, and crimping tool
* Electrical test probe
* Tire change kit with jack and lug nut wrench
* If you use anti-theft lug nuts, remember the key and
where it is kept
* Don't forget to maintain the proper tire pressure in the
spare tire
* Having a fully charged ABC fire extinguisher in the tow
vehicle is a good idea and you may also require at least
one in the boat, depending on its length
Spare parts should include:
* Electrical and duct tape
* Extra tie down straps and bungee cords
* Spare light bulbs
* Electrical wire of the same gauge as your wiring harness
* Crimp connectors
* 16 or 18 gauge aluminum wire
* A spare wiring harness plug and socket
* Spare wheel bearing kit and packet of grease
* Locking pins for the draw bar and coupler
TOWING THE TRAILER
When making the connection to the trailer, first adjust the trailer jack so the coupler is a few centimetres above the height of
the ball so you can locate the ball directly under the coupler
when backing up. Here is where a back-up camera in the vehicle is a real asset. Chock the trailer wheels and try to have a
spotter assist you, but if that is not possible, back up slowly taking time to stop the vehicle, set the brake, and get out of the
vehicle often enough to check the distance between the ball and
coupler. It is important to avoid hitting the coupler with the
hitch or rear bumper. If the tongue weight is light enough, you
may be able to move the coupler over the ball the last bit by
hand. When in position, turn off the engine, set the parking
brake, and connect the trailer following the checklist above.
When checking the safety chains, ensure they are slack enough
to allow the trailer to pivot left or right, but not so slack that they
drag on the ground.
Now that all the connections are made and everything is safe
and secure and ready for the trip, it's time for some driving tips.
Note: After you have been driving for about ten minutes, stop
the vehicle and set the brake, get out, and check all connections
to make sure everything is tight and still working properly. Touch

the wheel hubs to see if they are hot - they should not be. If they
are, there is probably a problem with the bearings. This will
need to be taken care of before continuing on your journey.
If you don't already have some trailering experience, practice
time is well spent. Take a friend, preferably one with some past
experience, and find a deserted parking lot and act as a spotter.
Start off slowly. Practice moving forwards and then, when you
are comfortable, backwards. Try turning; slow wide turns at first
and then gradually tighter turns. Take your time. The closer you
are to the ramp or parking spot the tighter the turns will have to
be and it will be more difficult than making wide, gentle turns.
Be aware of how sharp your turning angle can be before you
jackknife the trailer and cause damage to both it and the vehicle.
Give yourself lots of room.
Practice braking. It will take far more distance to stop, especially with a trailer that has no braking system of its own. Start
off slowly and then gradually increase your speed. Remember it
will take 50% or more extra distance to stop safely when you are
towing a trailer, depending on the size and weight of the trailer
and if it has its own braking system.
Practice time will be well spent and help build confidence.
At the start of each season, a bit of practice will help to renew
your skills and confidence.
Remember, all trailers will track to the inside of a turn, but
trailers with multiple axels will track more to the inside of the
turn than single axel trailers. Being aware of this will help avoid
hitting curbs, posts, other vehicles, or going off the paved shoulder of the road.
When you are on the road, be prepared for lots of little
squeaks, rattles, and jolts - these are just part of the trailering
experience and you will soon get used to them. If a new sound
or movement that is out of the ordinary begins to occur, stop and
check it out. Often you will be able to sense a change; checking
it out could head off a more major problem.
LAUNCHING AND RETRIEVING THE BOAT
The Launch
When you get to the launch ramp there are a number of things
you need to do before launching, so park in a staging area that
is clear of the ramp. If another person is launching their boat,
offer to assist. You might be glad of their assistance if they offer
to reciprocate. Having a spotter is always the best way to go.
Here is a pre-launch checklist:
* Inspect the ramp for any obstacles, loose gravel, tight
turns, or objects in the water that could cause a problem
* Note the drop off and how far you will need to back up;
if there is a sudden drop off or depression, make sure
you don't back the trailer wheels into it
* Check for wind and current and where you are going to
tie up the boat while you are parking the vehicle and
trailer; is there proper parking available or will you have
to park elsewhere?
* To ready the boat, remove the travel cover and stow it

www.canadianyachting.ca

61


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Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of Canadian Yachting June 2017

Vantage Point: A “Flare” for Safety
Club Profile: Sidney North Saanich Yacht Club
Pacific Northwest Classic: Southern Straits Race - For the last 49 years, the West Vancouver Yacht Club has proudly hosted the Annual Southern Straits Race. Known for offering challenging conditions, this Pacific Northwest classic is a proud qualifying event for both the VanIsle 360 and Vic-Maui Yacht Race. This year, Canadian Yachting magazine’s Bob Nicoll sailed on one of the 82 boats that competed. By Bob Nicoll
Canadian Boatbuilder Profile: Modernizing Tradition at Rossiter Boats - The history of Rossiter Boats is one that combines passion, fostering of tradition, and an eye towards the future. It all started 40 years ago with 19-year-old George Rossiter repairing the wooden canoe of a fellow cottager on Go Home Bay. Now Rossiter is perhaps Canada’s fastest-growing boatbuilder. By Kate Fincham
Cruising Technology: Staying Connected - Your summer cruise may be a vacation, but a pretty sizeable percentage of boat owners do want to keep in contact, whether for business or family reasons. In the not too distant past it was a big deal to clear your responsibilities and be able to take off for even a few weeks. However, connectivity for the average boater is improving and within the financial reach of most. By Glen Cairns
The Port Hole
Sail Review: Jeanneau 51 Yacht
Power Review: Leader 33
Trailering Part 3: Trailer Maintenance - Towing the Trailer, and Launching and Retrieving the Boat. The third and final article in our three-part series of important and useful information to help our readers travel with their boats on vacations, fishing trips or to regattas. Go safely this summer! By John Gullick
Crossing the Line: Boat or Reality – Take this simple test
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - Cover1
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - Cover2
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - Vantage Point: A “Flare” for Safety
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - 4
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - 5
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - Club Profile: Sidney North Saanich Yacht Club
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - 7
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - 8
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - 9
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - Pacific Northwest Classic: Southern Straits Race - For the last 49 years, the West Vancouver Yacht Club has proudly hosted the Annual Southern Straits Race. Known for offering challenging conditions, this Pacific Northwest classic is a proud qualifying event for both the VanIsle 360 and Vic-Maui Yacht Race. This year, Canadian Yachting magazine’s Bob Nicoll sailed on one of the 82 boats that competed. By Bob Nicoll
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - 11
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - 12
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - 13
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - Canadian Boatbuilder Profile: Modernizing Tradition at Rossiter Boats - The history of Rossiter Boats is one that combines passion, fostering of tradition, and an eye towards the future. It all started 40 years ago with 19-year-old George Rossiter repairing the wooden canoe of a fellow cottager on Go Home Bay. Now Rossiter is perhaps Canada’s fastest-growing boatbuilder. By Kate Fincham
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - 15
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - 16
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - 17
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - 18
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - 19
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - Cruising Technology: Staying Connected - Your summer cruise may be a vacation, but a pretty sizeable percentage of boat owners do want to keep in contact, whether for business or family reasons. In the not too distant past it was a big deal to clear your responsibilities and be able to take off for even a few weeks. However, connectivity for the average boater is improving and within the financial reach of most. By Glen Cairns
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - 21
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - 22
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - 23
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - 24
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - 25
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - 26
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - The Port Hole
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - 28
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - 29
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - 30
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - 31
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - 32
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - 33
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - 34
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - 35
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - 36
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - 37
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - 38
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - 39
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - 40
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - 41
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - 42
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - 43
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - 44
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - 45
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - 46
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - 47
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - 48
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - 49
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - Sail Review: Jeanneau 51 Yacht
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - 51
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - 52
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - 53
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - 54
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - 55
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - Power Review: Leader 33
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - 57
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - 58
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - 59
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - Trailering Part 3: Trailer Maintenance - Towing the Trailer, and Launching and Retrieving the Boat. The third and final article in our three-part series of important and useful information to help our readers travel with their boats on vacations, fishing trips or to regattas. Go safely this summer! By John Gullick
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - 61
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - 62
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - 63
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - 64
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - 65
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - 66
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - 67
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Canadian Yachting June 2017 - 75
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - 76
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - 77
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - Crossing the Line: Boat or Reality – Take this simple test
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - Cover3
Canadian Yachting June 2017 - Cover4
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