Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - 22

"While the industry
continues to call
for national level
commitment to
resolving issues of
seaport and supply
chain infrastructure
deficiencies, the bulk of
the coordination activity
is being accomplished at
a state and local level."
-Ram Kancharla,
Port Tampa Bay

Logistics Council, and Consolidated G
rain & Barge.
A robust level of involvement was crucial
from the get-go, according to Rich Allen,
manager of communications/marketing
for the Ports of Indiana. He said, "For the
TIGER grant, our local partners and community leaders provided critical support
for the project and a united voice stating
the need for multimodal improvements
to keep up with freight projections in this
rapidly growing logistics hub."
The Port of Indiana-Jeffersonville generates $2 billion in economic activity each
year and nearly 13,200 jobs. Allen said,
"We are fortunate to have elected officials, local leaders and private companies
that not only understand the important
economic role the port plays in the community, but also what the port needs to
continue to be successful and grow its
economic value in the future."
Allen said, "Securing a TIGER grant
takes a team effort and the adage 'it takes
a village' certainly applies to managing it as
well. At the Ports of Indiana, we assembled
a cross-functional team of operations, legal,
finance and engineering staff to manage
the grant and are contracting with outside
firms to coordinate specific components."
To maintain open communication with
the maritime community and keep them
22

AAPA SEAPORTS MAGAZINE

GAO: ON STEPS TO
IMPROVE DOT'S
FREIGHT MOBILITY
In late 2016, the U.S. Government
Accountability Office (GAO) issued a
report entitled West Coast Ports: Better
Supply Chain Information Could Improve
DOT's Freight Efforts (www.gao.gov/
assets/690/680719.pdf). Intended to be
responsive to the national outcry following
shifts in global shipping and disruptions
at west coast ports, the report was tagged
as an informational summary to improve
the U.S. Department of Transportation's
(DOT) freight efforts on the West Coast.
It addresses serious logistical challenges
including how major U.S. West Coast ports
have responded to the global trade and transportation evolution, how certain shippers
were impacted by and responded to recent
port disruption, and how DOT's efforts support port cargo movement. It looks at areas
to improve DOT's effectiveness.
The report said, "GAO conducted case studies of the three major port regions on the West
Coast; interviewed key stakeholders - such as
port authorities and state and local transportation agencies - for each region and 21 industry
representatives, and evaluated DOT's freight
efforts relative to criteria on using quality information to support decision-making."

Key Findings:
* Some infrastructure and operations at
major West Coast ports are strained.
* Port stakeholders are attempting to
address constraints.
* All major West Coast ports have planned
or completed port-related infrastructure
projects and implemented operational

filled in on all infrastructure developments, Allen said, "Our port team communicates on an almost daily basis with our
customers and meets with them regularly
to discuss current infrastructure needs
and long-term business projections." He
noted that the port's magazine, website,
media releases, tweets, and other outreach
initiatives are vehicles for sharing projects
and celebrating benefits.

Local Control
It has become crucial for ports to have
an open dialogue with the full range of

*

*

*
*

*

changes to address constraints, but the
solutions can be hampered by competing
priorities and limited data.
Having information on ports' performance and industry supply chains - the
end-to-end process of producing and distributing a product or commodity from
origin to ultimate customer - would
reportedly be helpful to target efforts to
address constraints at ports.
Shippers appear to be impacted by and
respond to a port disruption in various
ways. In response to one labor disruption
in particular, certain shippers modified
their supply chains by diverting to other
ports or other modes.
Perishability and other factors handicap
a shipper's ability to divert.
DOT's freight-related activities are
increasingly multi-modal and inclusive
of ports, but gaps exist in important
supply chain information available to
DOT and state and local governments. A
paucity of domestic origin and destination data may hamper analysis of trade
flows and planning for freight mobility
improvements.
The need for good information is being
addressed by DOT, but gaps remain.

Recommendation:
In its efforts to enhance freight mobility
and advance national freight policy goals,
DOT's developing freight data strategy
should identify: what supply chain information is needed, potential sources of
that information, data gaps, and how it
intends to use this information to inform
freight efforts. DOT concurred with
the recommendation.

their stakeholders to address challenges
and opportunities and devise infrastructure solutions.
Effective project management processes
for ports include copious outreach, aligned
objectives, adjustments, quality control
and keeping an eye out for potential bottlenecks, guarding against creeping scope,
managing risks and resolving issues.
A successful mix of planning, monitoring, and controlling will allow a project
to be completed on time, on budget and
with results that satisfy a broad range
of stakeholders.


http://www.gao.gov/

Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017

AAPA Headquarters
From the President’s Desk
Ports’ Power as Conveners
FAST Act Impact
Following Up on the Funding Trail
Infrastructure Coordination: Competing Globally, Acting Locally
A Digital Vision of Leadership: Using Technology to Improve the Supply Chain in Los Angeles
XXV Latin American Congress of Ports
Every American, Every Day is Impacted by Port Activities
LED Lighting – The Right Choice for Ports?
Index of Advertisers
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - into
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - bellyband1
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - bellyband2
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - cover1
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - cover2
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - 3
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - 4
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - 5
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - AAPA Headquarters
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - 7
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - From the President’s Desk
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - 9
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - Ports’ Power as Conveners
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - 11
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - 12
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - 13
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - FAST Act Impact
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - 15
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - 16
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - Following Up on the Funding Trail
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - 18
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - 19
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - Infrastructure Coordination: Competing Globally, Acting Locally
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - 21
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - 22
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - 23
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - A Digital Vision of Leadership: Using Technology to Improve the Supply Chain in Los Angeles
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - 25
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - XXV Latin American Congress of Ports
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - 27
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - Every American, Every Day is Impacted by Port Activities
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - 29
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - LED Lighting – The Right Choice for Ports?
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - 31
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - Index of Advertisers
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - 33
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - 34
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - cover3
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - cover4
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - divider1
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - divider2
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - 41
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - 42
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - 43
Seaports Magazine - Spring 2017 - 44
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