Seaports Magazine - Summer 2016 - (Page 8)

» FRoM tHe PResIDent's Desk Ports as Good Neighbors B By Kurt J. Nagle President & CEO American Association of Port Authorities y the very nature of the work they do, ports cannot and do not exist in isolation. Many port cities are some of the western hemisphere's oldest cities as well, as communities grew up around places where people could trade goods and have access to other parts of the world via oceans, rivers, bays and the Great Lakes. Many port cities remain popular tourist destinations and desirable places to live, as population density and trends in migration to the coasts have continued to place pressure on waterfront property. AAPA member ports in all four of our delegations recognize and embrace their responsibilities when it comes to being key partners in their communities. While individual ports and individual communities each have their own specific sets of priorities, constraints, goals and limitations, there are consistent values and themes that emerge throughout the hemisphere. Ports recognize the need to conduct business in an open, transparent way. Whether for the benefit of customers and business partners or communities and other stakeholders, port authorities understand that they occupy a unique space as public entities that are often expected to perform financially like private ones. It's that public role that drives ports to open their doors, their meetings, their books, their processes and their decision-making to members of the public and the media. Ports also understand that their operations and expansion projects often have impacts on nearby communities, and those impacts must be mitigated. But mitigation efforts must not hamper ports' abilities to be economic engines for their cities and regions. For many ports, this role of job creation and economic activity was the driving force behind their creation decades or even centuries ago. So ports must always be mindful of contributing to the prosperity of their communities. While individual ports and individual communities each have their own specific sets of priorities, constraints, goals and limitations, there are consistent values and themes that emerge throughout the hemisphere. 8 AAPA SEAPORTS MAGAZINE The best supply chain strategy in the business doesn't stand a chance of being effective if community groups block projects, speak out against operational changes or challenge port business decisions. This issue of Seaports focuses on the theme of Ports as Good Neighbors. It's intended to provide a look at this idea from the executive office down to the community relations manager. Some of the toughest decisions that ports deal with include changing landscapes when it comes to balancing human capital with technology or being forced to be a part of conflicts over energy cargoes and policies. They must constantly try to determine what their responsibilities are to themselves, their stakeholders and their communities. The big picture philosophy of a port's relationship with its community has to come from port leadership - a strategic direction set by the port director, the port commission or the combined work of both. Articulating the organization's commitment to the community is important so neighbors understand that they are important to the port authority - not just to a particular staff member or port department. But it is those staff departments that ultimately must carry out the vision of the executive or board - spending time in the community, building relationships, participating in events and creating programs that provide visibility to the port and value to its neighbors. With that work in mind, this issue includes a Community Outreach Toolbox that showcases some of the many best practices in use in our industry today. I think this portion of Seaports will be of particular value to our members. This topic will be discussed in more detail at the AAPA Cargo Optimization Seminar, June 7-8 in Jersey City, New Jersey. This new program aims to meet the needs of both container and noncontainer ports and cover supply chain optimization as well as community relations. After all, the best supply chain strategy in the business doesn't stand a chance of being effective if community groups block projects, speak out against operational changes or challenge port business decisions. For a port to be effective at moving cargo, it needs to have both sound infrastructure and operational efficiencies as well as the support of its neighbors. ●

Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of Seaports Magazine - Summer 2016

AAPA Headquarters
From the President's Desk
Ports Strengthen Partnerships Via Community Outreach
The Slippery Slope: Ethical Considerations in Port Business Decisions
Community Outreach Toolbox
Symbiotic Cooperation Leads to Success for Everyone
Community Relationships: Build Them Now
Port Community Outreach: A University's Role
Index of Advertisers

Seaports Magazine - Summer 2016

http://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/AAPQ/AAPQ0118
http://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/AAPQ/AAPQ0417
http://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/AAPQ/AAPQ0317
http://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/AAPQ/AAPQ0217
http://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/AAPQ/AAPQ0117
http://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/AAPQ/AAPQ0416
http://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/AAPQ/AAPQ0316
http://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/AAPQ/AAPQ0216
http://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/AAPQ/AAPQ0116
http://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/AAPQ/AAPQ0415
http://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/AAPQ/AAPQ0315
http://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/AAPQ/AAPQ0215
http://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/AAPQ/AAPQ0115
http://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/AAPQ/AAPQ0414
http://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/AAPQ/AAPQ0314
http://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/AAPQ/AAPQ0214
http://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/AAPQ/AAPQ0114
http://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/AAPQ/AAPQ0413
http://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/AAPQ/AAPQ0313
http://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/AAPQ/AAPQ0213
http://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/AAPQ/AAPQ0113
http://www.nxtbookMEDIA.com