Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - 14

» FEATURE

WHY PORTS
NEED ALLIES

WHEN YOU HAVE WHAT EVERYONE WANTS,
MAINTAINING YOUR WORKING WATERFRONT
TAKES A NETWORK OF SUPPORTERS
By Candace Gibson

Be Creative, Inclusive with
Designs for Coveted Land
At the Port of San Diego, President & CEO
Randa Coniglio knows this challenge very
well. "Our working waterfront is surrounded
by a number of important stakeholder interests," she says. "There are a lot of different
interests in what goes on at the marine terminals and shipyards, and they aren't only
the interests of the neighbors nearby, but the
interests of other small local businesses that
serve the waterfront, traffic concerns relative to cargo-handling trucks on and off the
terminals, and a number of impacts like that."
Coniglio adds that it's a challenge to grow
business because "every additional truck is
an additional impact to the community," and
because the port must consider competing
interests from developers, government and
the public. "It's coveted land. There are any
number of interest groups that would like to
gobble it up," she summarizes.
There is enormous value in making all of
your stakeholders your allies, but that would
14

AAPA SEAPORTS MAGAZINE

be an impossible task to do
every day, with every decision. "We work really hard
to maintain good working
relationships of mutual trust
with a variety of stakeholders. I believe it's important
not to alienate any of them,"
she says. Coniglio talks regularly with these stakeholders to keep them close and
understand their concerns.
She offers as an example
Ships docking at the Port of San Diego, such as this
the port's relationship with
Princess Cruises Star Princess, pull into areas that are
considered prime real estate and coveted by many.
the California State Lands
Commission and the port's
recent certification of an
Marine Terminal Expansion EIR, "It is difficult to successfully balance the abundance
environmental impact report on the Tenth
Avenue Marine Terminal modernization projof concerns and perspectives associated with
ect. The report allows the port to quadruple
a project like this, but the port worked hard
to figure out the best way to modernize the
business at this terminal, as well as to address
maritime uses at the terminal and advance
community concerns about air quality. "We
identified beyond mitigation measures things
important environmental projections. The
we would do to benefit the neighboring comTenth Avenue Marine Terminal expansion
munity," she says. "It was a day we really celpreserves and bolsters the foundational
ebrated. We had not only our cargo terminal
maritime elements on the terminal, while
tenants and other interested waterfront parharnessing innovation to diminish emissions
ties there to support the board's decision to
and promote environmental sustainability."
certify the report, but we had neighbors and
residents close to the terminal - some who
Communicate the What,
traditionally oppose port measures - lined
Why and How
up in support of the board action because of
At the Port of Everett, maintaining allies at
the benefits they would derive from air quality
the working waterfront also requires constant
and the consideration of improvements to a
communication. CEO/Executive Director
nearby elementary school."
Les Reardanz calls it a challenge "to make
The chairman of the State Lands
sure everyone knows what we do, why we
Commission, Lieutenant Governor Gavin
do it and why it matters to them. We're conNewsom remarks on the Tenth Avenue
stantly talking about why our projects matter."
Photo Courtesy: Port of San Diego / Dale Frost

I

t's a delicate balance to maintain a
working waterfront and nurture relationships with parties who want a
piece of valuable maritime real estate.
Ports are under near-constant pressure to
make available a portion of their water and
land to the community, local government and
even the private sector. Finding allies among
waterfront stakeholders is essential to keeping
ports' welfare afloat. While it's a challenge to
keep a diverse portfolio of allies, ports that
foster these relationships also enjoy economic
success and healthy community ties.



Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017

AAPA Headquarters
From the President’s Desk
Stakeholders: A Seaport’s Secret Resource
Why Ports Need Allies: Maintaining a Working Waterfront Takes a Network of Supporters
The Next Generation of Leaders — Succession Planning Provides Security, Guidance for Future
Port Security — An Exercise in Partnerships
Lessons From the Past: A Renewed Commentary on Port Security
Cyber Security: What Port Authorities Need to Know
Tomorrow’s Leaders Need More Than On-the-Job Training
Index of Advertisers
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - Intro
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - bellyband1
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - bellyband2
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - cover1
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - cover2
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - 3
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - 4
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - 5
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - AAPA Headquarters
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - 7
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - From the President’s Desk
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - 9
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - Stakeholders: A Seaport’s Secret Resource
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - 11
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - 12
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - 13
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - Why Ports Need Allies: Maintaining a Working Waterfront Takes a Network of Supporters
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - 15
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - 16
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - 17
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - The Next Generation of Leaders — Succession Planning Provides Security, Guidance for Future
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - 19
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - 20
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - 21
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - Port Security — An Exercise in Partnerships
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - 23
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - 24
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - 25
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - Lessons From the Past: A Renewed Commentary on Port Security
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - 27
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - Cyber Security: What Port Authorities Need to Know
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - 29
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - 30
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - 31
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - Tomorrow’s Leaders Need More Than On-the-Job Training
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - 33
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - Index of Advertisers
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - cover3
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - cover4
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - divider1
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - divider2
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - 41
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - 42
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - 43
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Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - outsert1
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - outsert2
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