Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - 32

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GUEST VIEWPOINT

Tomorrow's Leaders Need
More Than On-the-Job Training
By Erik Stromberg, Executive Director, Center for Advances in Port Management, Lamar University

G

Contributing: George Saltsman, Director, Center for Research in Educational Innovation and Digital
Learning; Dr. Karen Girton-Snyder, Director of Instructional Design and Course Development

enerations of port industry
leaders have bemoaned the
fact that the only way to learn
how to manage a port was
to manage a port. However, on-the-job
training cannot alone prepare the next
generation of leaders for the significant
responsibilities they will assume. The wide
range of aptitudes and knowledge needed
by today's port and marine terminal manager cross multiple disciplines, with many
of those fields undergoing rapid innovation and transformative change. The port
management 'equation' is as dynamic and
complex as it has ever been. Tomorrow's
industry leaders need not only practical
knowledge but also the theoretical foundation and analytical skills with which to
understand and prepare for the future.
Furthermore, the educational systems
needed to prepare the next generation of
port leaders must be tailored to the ways
that our future leaders learn. The past must
not be the prologue.
AAPA's Professional Port Manager
Certification (PPM) program, implemented
in the late 1990s during my tenure as AAPA
CEO, addresses the need to better train
and educate up-and-coming port professionals. The educational framework is
empirical and pragmatic. The PPM program depends on industry experts sharing their knowledge and experiences with
younger professionals. Conferences and
seminars facilitate face-to-face interaction
and networking.
Recently, AAPA's Curriculum Committee
has undertaken steps to connect PPM to
more rigorous academic pathways. This
initiative includes partnering with Lamar
University's Center for Advances in Port
Management (CAPM). CAPM, established
in 2015, offers as its centerpiece a robust
and fully online master's degree program
in port and marine terminal management
32

AAPA SEAPORTS MAGAZINE

(see www.lamar.edu/portmanagement).
While CAPM welcomes students continuing their education, its focus is on providing working professionals a unique, port
industry relevant advanced education
degree. Professionals awarded the PPM
certification can receive course credits
toward CAPM's master's degree. Linkage
to the port industry is assured through
the Center's Advisory Board and through
our connections with numerous port and
maritime entities, both public and private,
highlighted by our affiliation with AAPA's
Curriculum Committee.
Noel Hacegaba, Chief Commercial
Officer at the Port of Long Beach
and Chairman of AAPA's Curriculum
Committee, views the alliance with CAPM
as an important complement to the PPM
program, providing the level of education
and training future port industry leaders
will require, both in content and method
of delivery. "The partnership with Lamar
University takes AAPA's longstanding commitment to preparing the next generation of
port authority leaders to a new level," said
Dr. Hacegaba. "The collaboration between
CAPM and the PPM program integrates
theory and practice in a way that will provide participants with rigorous and relevant
training for the challenges of today and
tomorrow, while leveraging the benefits of
distance learning," added Hacegaba.
In higher education, the trend toward
remote learning platforms through online
distance education is rapidly gaining
momentum. A recent report documented
over 5.8 million U.S. students taking at least
one online distance education course and
nearly two-thirds of U.S. colleges offering
one or more fully online degree programs.
Distance learning offers many benefits,
underscored by its accessibility, affordability and flexibility. While it may appear that
an online format is primarily suited for tech

savvy kids, 73 percent of online distance
education students are adult-aged learners.
Networking and remote learning hardly
seem compatible. Yet, the digital pathway
to learning can accommodate and even
enhance collaboration among students.
Wherever possible, online teachers use the
depth and breadth of experiences that are
embodied among their students to supplement and enrich prepared course materials.
With most of CAPM's online students are
actively employed in the port or marine
terminal industry, classes use real-world
data and industry relevant analysis as key
components of the learning experience. The
opportunity provided by distance learning
to enhance career opportunities for young
managers brings together the best of both
higher education and professional training.
The synergy works and it works well.
In sum, the knowledge and skills
our industry's future leaders will need
exceeds that required of previous generations. Moreover, the pace of change itself
accelerates. Facilitating the acquisition of
required skills and knowledge will require
augmenting traditional methods with new
approaches - mindful of the need to husband time and money. Digital learning
technologies play a key role. CAPM plays
an important role reaching out to the next
generation of port industry leaders, connecting the past to the future. As one student told me recently, "My father was a chief
engineer on a tanker. I know ports, ships
and cargo. They're in my blood." As she
spoke, she held in her hand a smart phone
bringing to her a world of information as
well as a network of mentors. By joining
the necessary analytical skills to navigate
an increasingly data-driven world with the
wisdom of experience, we can prepare the
next generation of port industry leaders for
the challenges and opportunities that lie in
their path. ●


http://www.lamar.edu/portmanagement

Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017

AAPA Headquarters
From the President’s Desk
Stakeholders: A Seaport’s Secret Resource
Why Ports Need Allies: Maintaining a Working Waterfront Takes a Network of Supporters
The Next Generation of Leaders — Succession Planning Provides Security, Guidance for Future
Port Security — An Exercise in Partnerships
Lessons From the Past: A Renewed Commentary on Port Security
Cyber Security: What Port Authorities Need to Know
Tomorrow’s Leaders Need More Than On-the-Job Training
Index of Advertisers
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - Intro
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - bellyband1
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - bellyband2
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - cover1
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - cover2
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - 3
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - 4
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - 5
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - AAPA Headquarters
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - 7
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - From the President’s Desk
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - 9
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - Stakeholders: A Seaport’s Secret Resource
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - 11
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - 12
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - 13
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - Why Ports Need Allies: Maintaining a Working Waterfront Takes a Network of Supporters
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - 15
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - 16
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - 17
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - The Next Generation of Leaders — Succession Planning Provides Security, Guidance for Future
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - 19
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - 20
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - 21
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - Port Security — An Exercise in Partnerships
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - 23
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - 24
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - 25
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - Lessons From the Past: A Renewed Commentary on Port Security
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - 27
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - Cyber Security: What Port Authorities Need to Know
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - 29
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - 30
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - 31
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - Tomorrow’s Leaders Need More Than On-the-Job Training
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - 33
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - Index of Advertisers
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - cover3
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - cover4
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - divider1
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - divider2
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Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - outsert1
Seaports Magazine - Summer 2017 - outsert2
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