Seaports Magazine - Fall 2014 - (Page 26)

CRuISE LINES SET SAIL FOR GROWTH By Sarah Sain A ccording to Cruise Market Watch, the cruise industry worldwide has had an annual average passenger growth rate of 7 percent from 1990 to 2018. Growth to date has been driven by new ships with larger capacities, ship diversification, more local ports, more destinations and new on-board/on-shore activities that match demands of passengers. A total of six new ships were added in 2014 with a total passenger capacity of 17,410, and in 2015 and 2016, 17 more new cruise ships will debut. These new ships will add billions in annual revenue to the cruise industry. Seaports talked to three of the largest cruise ports in the U.S. to get their thoughts on this year-over-year growth and how ports can keep up in terms modern facilities that meet the needs of passengers. PortMiami welcomed nearly 4 million passengers in 2013 and is homeport to 13 cruise lines. The port has seven cruise terminals. In 2012, the port unveiled a $15 million upgrade to Terminal D that included adding square footage, building new facilities for security screening, passenger check-ins and a "VIP" area. More than 3.6 million passengers made their way through Port Everglades in 2013. In early December, Port Everglades will open its new, fully renovated $24 million Cruise Terminal 4, which now includes a revamped transportation area, more parking spaces, 50 check-in counters and two new loading bridges to expedite the embark and debark process. Cruise Terminals 2, 19, 21 and 26 were completely updated in December 2012 as part of a $54 million renovation project. 26 AAPA SEAPORTS MAGAZINE The Port of New Orleans marketed itself as "two vacations in one" to the nearly 1 million passengers who went through the port in 2013. The port completed a $23 million renovation on its Julia Street Wharf terminal in 2011 and is currently building its third terminal, a $30 million, 130,000-square-foot complex along Poland Avenue. The terminal is expected to open in fall 2016 and accommodate ships with up to 4,000 passengers. What a Passenger Wants PortMiami Director Juan Kuryla, PPM®, said the port continually improves its facilities with the customer in mind - customer meaning the cruise lines and their passengers. Kuryla said unlike an airport, where a passenger knows they maybe be in the terminal or at the gate for 45 minutes or more, cruise passengers want to get through the terminal and onto the ship as quickly as possible. "Passengers want to park or be dropped off close to the terminal," he said. "They Cruise ships at Port Everglades. THE BOTTOM LINE Cruise ports are under pressure to update and bring on board new terminals to accommodate growth that the industry has seen for more than 20 years. There are a number of ways to fund these facility investments, but in the end it must be a winwin for both the port and the cruise line. also want a beautiful terminal that smells good, feels good and is clean. That's the ambiance we try to create." Access: That's what Port of New Orleans President and CEO Gary LaGrange, PPM®, said all cruise passengers are after - access to nearby parking, access on and off the ship, and access to the city and its restaurants, hotels and entertainment. Port Everglades Chief Executive and Port Director Steve Cernak, PPM®, agreed that cruise passengers desire convenience above all else at when at the port.

Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of Seaports Magazine - Fall 2014

AAPA Seaports Magazine
From the President’s Desk
The Big Ship Race – Is Bigger Better?
Shipping Lines Partner to Stay Afloat
Cruise Lines Set Sail for Growth
Bulk Cargo Ports Valuable to the Community
Crafting Funding Solutions for Port Projects
Sister Agreements Spread Cultural Wealth
Strong Financial Ratings Open the Door of Opportunity
Customer Service a Key to Strong Bottom Line Results
Plug in to the Fuel of the Future: Electricity
Houston Thinks Outside the Box With Non-Traditional Lines of Business
Ohio Port Authorities Know How to Rock Economic Development
XXIII Congress of Latin American Ports
Index of Advertisers

Seaports Magazine - Fall 2014

http://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/AAPQ/AAPQ0118
http://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/AAPQ/AAPQ0417
http://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/AAPQ/AAPQ0317
http://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/AAPQ/AAPQ0217
http://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/AAPQ/AAPQ0117
http://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/AAPQ/AAPQ0416
http://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/AAPQ/AAPQ0316
http://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/AAPQ/AAPQ0216
http://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/AAPQ/AAPQ0116
http://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/AAPQ/AAPQ0415
http://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/AAPQ/AAPQ0315
http://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/AAPQ/AAPQ0215
http://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/AAPQ/AAPQ0115
http://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/AAPQ/AAPQ0414
http://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/AAPQ/AAPQ0314
http://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/AAPQ/AAPQ0214
http://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/AAPQ/AAPQ0114
http://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/AAPQ/AAPQ0413
http://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/AAPQ/AAPQ0313
http://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/AAPQ/AAPQ0213
http://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/AAPQ/AAPQ0113
http://www.nxtbookMEDIA.com