Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 38

» FEATURE THINKING OUTSIDE THE BOX Productivity at Non-Container Ports By Meredith Martino By Lori Musser T EUs. It's hard to have a discussion about port productivity without using the word. The short-hand description of containerized cargo is one of the measurements that denotes the size of a vessel or the cargo throughput of a port. Cross TEUs with time, and the metric becomes the default description of the productivity of a marine terminal. What if there are no TEUs? Many ports throughout the Americas don't handle containerized cargo or only handle small amounts of it. These ports move other cargo - dry bulk, liquid bulk, breakbulk and oversized/specialty cargo. Non-container ports may not be able to measure and discuss productivity in the same, crisp language as container ports, but their interest in maximizing assets, minimizing delays and increasing efficiency is similar to that of ports whose facilities are full of stacks of brightly-colored shipping containers. For Sean Strawbridge, COO of the Port of Corpus Christi, productivity is "the efficiency by which you can move goods off vessels, through facilities and out to market or a product from the fields, through the port and out to be exported to the world." Dean Haen, Director of the Port of Green Bay, agrees, saying, "It all comes down to time. The ship, the crew, the fuel... those are all fixed. The port can't affect how fast [goods] travel but can affect how fast they unload and load." Metrics with non-container ports are trickier. The Port of Everett's Executive Director Les Reardanz called his port "a value port, not a tonnage port." But Green Bay's Haen emphasized that tonnage is often the default used, especially by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. 38 AAPA SEAPORTS MAGAZINE At Port of Everett, handling cargo flawlessly is just as important as handling it quickly. "These metrics influence Corps decisions and things like the placement of assets such as Coast Guard ice breakers," said Haen. "Some ports have to work hard to get to one million tons, which is what they need to get dredged. The more activity you have, the more fully utilized you are, the more it influences." So many factors go into the efficiency equation, though: land use footprint of the port, age and status of equipment, labor on the terminal and special requirements of the cargo being handled, to name a few. The latter is a significant issue for the Port of Everett in Washington state. "Safe handling of sensitive and high value cargo" is one of the ways the Port of Everett measures its productivity, according to Reardanz. For the items that move through the port, shippers "usually only make one of them," explained Lisa Lefeber, Chief of Policy and

Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016

AAPA Headquarters
From the President’s Desk
Seaports Congestion and Cargo Movements
The Future of Automation
Port Cooperation: In the Name of Productivity
Strategy at Seaports Is Key to Handling Capacity Challenges
Thinking Outside the Box: Productivity at Non-Container Ports
Latin America’s Proactive Approach
Cruise Port Productivity — Upgrading Infrastructure for a Growing Industry
Modernizing America’s Ports for the Next Generation
Thank You, Helen Delich Bentley
Working Together for Seamless Experiences
Optimizing Systems for Profitability
New Orleans Marketplace
Index of Advertisers
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - bellyband1
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Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - cover1
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - cover2
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 3
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 4
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 5
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - AAPA Headquarters
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 7
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - From the President’s Desk
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 9
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - Seaports Congestion and Cargo Movements
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 11
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 12
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 13
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 14
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 15
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - The Future of Automation
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 17
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 18
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 19
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 20
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 21
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 22
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 23
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - Port Cooperation: In the Name of Productivity
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 25
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 26
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 27
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 28
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 29
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 30
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 31
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 32
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 33
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - Strategy at Seaports Is Key to Handling Capacity Challenges
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 35
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 36
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 37
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - Thinking Outside the Box: Productivity at Non-Container Ports
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 39
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 40
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 41
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 42
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 43
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - Latin America’s Proactive Approach
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 45
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 46
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 47
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 48
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 49
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - Cruise Port Productivity — Upgrading Infrastructure for a Growing Industry
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 51
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 52
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 53
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 54
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 55
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - Modernizing America’s Ports for the Next Generation
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 57
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - Thank You, Helen Delich Bentley
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 59
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - Working Together for Seamless Experiences
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 61
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - Optimizing Systems for Profitability
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - New Orleans Marketplace
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 64
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 65
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - Index of Advertisers
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Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - cover4
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - divider1
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