Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 8

» FROM THE PRESIDENT'S DESK Work, Energy and Power at Ports W By Kurt J. Nagle President & CEO American Association of Port Authorities hether you're back to packing lunches, asking your grandkids about their teachers or just stopping behind a yellow school bus on your way to work, fall is a natural time to have memories of school. Do you remember learning the basics of physical science, especially work, energy and power? In early science classes, children learn that work = force x distance, and energy is the ability to get work done. Power is the rate at which work is done. Machines can't make less work, but they can change the amount of force or distance used to get the work done. Kids learn how the six simple machines (pulley, level, wedge, wheel & axle, inclined plane and screw) provide mechanical advantages to getting work done and how these machines work together to make compound machines. Energy to accomplish work can either be stored (potential) or working (kinetic) and can come from different sources, both renewable and nonrenewable. Power brings time into the equation, measuring how quickly work is accomplished. It's no wonder that so many ports do outreach to school groups, either by facilitating tours and field trips or creating materials that can be used in the classroom. A working marine terminal is an impressive display of physical science in action, the sight of work being done and energy being expended on a grand scale. Port productivity really just comes down to some of those early physical science lessons, measuring the amount of work done, the energy used to achieve the work and the rate at which the work is finished. Of course, ports also add an accounting lesson on top of the science, taking into account the monetary cost associated with increasing work outputs, the rate of work or the amount of energy expended to get work done. This issue of Seaports takes a deep dive into the topic of productivity - the obstacles that hinder progress, how ports measure productivity and opportunities to utilize technology or process improvements to increase productivity. Different ports have different hurdles to clear. For some, congestion is a huge challenge. Inefficiency in one part of the supply chain is critical for some ports that have little margin of error, and one bottleneck can cause backups throughout a port complex. For other ports, capacity is the biggest hindrance, as adding usable land, additional work hours or depth to their waterways is all but impossible. Ports must also decide what metrics they will use to track productivity. The range of cargos handled in ports means that a range of measures is likely necessary. Containers are uniform and ubiquitous, but that fact does not mean there is an easy or simple way to track their movement throughout the supply chain. Expensive, oversized cargo or bulk products are the mainstays of many ports throughout the Western Hemisphere, and measuring the handling of these products requires a different approach than focusing on containers. When the "cargo" is people, in the form of cruise passengers, the metrics discussion shifts further. Yet all ports are seeking ways to ensure that they are efficiently and effectively utilizing their assets. Investing in new assets to boost productivity can be risky with high costs, but the potential for incredible improvements if all goes well. As ports incorporate automated technology as a solution to their challenges, the face of the industry is beginning to change. While some argue the ports of the Western Hemisphere are behind their Asian or European counterparts on the adoption of automation, our member ports are blazing trails in the Americas and changing the discussion of what is possible and what works best. We have covered the topic of productivity from a variety of angles in this issue of Seaports to appeal to our broad and diverse membership. This issue is one that hits home for all our members - both ports and the industry solution providers who partner with them. In this season of back-to-school, I hope this issue is educational for you. ● Join AAPA for 105th Annual Conference in New Orleans Held each fall in a different port city, AAPA's Annual Convention (http://bit.ly/ AAPANewOrleans) continues to be the largest membership meeting of the year. The 2016 Convention in New Orleans will represent the 105th in AAPA's history. It includes technical and policy committee meetings, as well as business sessions and social networking events for port professionals and others in the marine transportation industry. The 2016 Convention will be held October 23-26, 2016, at the Sheraton New Orleans Hotel. 8 AAPA SEAPORTS MAGAZINE http://www.bit.ly/aapaneworleans

Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016

AAPA Headquarters
From the President’s Desk
Seaports Congestion and Cargo Movements
The Future of Automation
Port Cooperation: In the Name of Productivity
Strategy at Seaports Is Key to Handling Capacity Challenges
Thinking Outside the Box: Productivity at Non-Container Ports
Latin America’s Proactive Approach
Cruise Port Productivity — Upgrading Infrastructure for a Growing Industry
Modernizing America’s Ports for the Next Generation
Thank You, Helen Delich Bentley
Working Together for Seamless Experiences
Optimizing Systems for Profitability
New Orleans Marketplace
Index of Advertisers
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Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - AAPA Headquarters
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Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - From the President’s Desk
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 9
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - Seaports Congestion and Cargo Movements
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Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - The Future of Automation
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Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - Port Cooperation: In the Name of Productivity
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Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - Strategy at Seaports Is Key to Handling Capacity Challenges
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Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - Thinking Outside the Box: Productivity at Non-Container Ports
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Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - Latin America’s Proactive Approach
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Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - Cruise Port Productivity — Upgrading Infrastructure for a Growing Industry
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Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - Modernizing America’s Ports for the Next Generation
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Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - Thank You, Helen Delich Bentley
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 59
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - Working Together for Seamless Experiences
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - 61
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - Optimizing Systems for Profitability
Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - New Orleans Marketplace
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Seaports Magazine - Fall 2016 - Index of Advertisers
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