Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - 19

Certainly MAR is one
of the key elements to
help manage our surface
water and groundwater
resources together.
basin and maintain a hydraulic barrier
along the coast to minimize further
seawater intrusion. The Groundwater
Replenishment System is world renowned
as the most advanced wastewater treatment
involving microfiltration, reverse osmosis,
ultraviolet light (UCV) oxidation with
hydrogen peroxide, decarbonation and
lime treatment to buffer and stabilize the
water for reuse.
The City of Santa Monica is one of
the leaders in sustainable watershed
management, incorporating slowit, spread-it, sink-it techniques in a
highly urbanized environment, driven
by stormwater issues and regulatory
mandates. In the urban setting, studies
have demonstrated that as hardscapes
increase, runoff and stream water quality
degrades. The City has worked with private
industry to place multiple natural and
enhanced filtration (raingarden) structures
along streets and parkways, replacing
hardscapes with permeable paving, large
underground retention facilities and
rainwater harvesting/direct use structures
in place.
A future focus of managed aquifer
recharge is flooding agricultural
fields where capturing and recharging
stormflows is gaining acceptance.
California has a significant agricultural
industry, supplying approximately half the
fruits, nuts and vegetables to the nation.
The University of California-Davis and
Sustainable Conservation have been
working with farmers to apply available
floodwater on their active farmlands
in ways that do not compromise
food production. Studies thus far are
encouraging, looking at the effects
of flooding on a variety of crop types
over varying periods of time. If applied
successfully, this could help put recharge
solutions at the source of the majority
of demand.
California has a large number of active
and successful managed aquifer recharge

projects, but with a long history of floods
and droughts, and the most extreme
weather variability in yearly precipitation
in the nation (DWRa 2017), California
simply needs to do much, much more.
Most recently, water years 2012-2015
were the four driest consecutive years in
statewide history (DWRb 2017), within a
10-year period of which eight years were
well below average precipitation. The
short-term reaction and response to this
and previous droughts, when less surface
water is available, has been to increase
groundwater pumping. Coupled with
this increased use of groundwater is the
decrease in surface water deliveries due
to increasing environmental demands
resulting in chronic groundwater
depletion. Simply put, we are living beyond
our means when it comes to groundwater
resources. The record low groundwater
levels in many of the state's 517
groundwater basins led to land subsidence
in areas, and to a record number of wells
going dry, leaving some communities
without water.
Record dry years, wells going dry and
land subsidence also led to the California
Sustainable Groundwater Management
Act (SGMA) (http://bit.ly/1RSWmT1)
being passed in late 2014. SGMA requires
that the 127-designated basins (1)
form new groundwater sustainability
agencies by June 30, 2017; (2) develop
new groundwater sustainability plans by
January 31, 2020 or 2022 (depending upon
whether the basin is critically overdraft or
not); and (3) become sustainably managed
within 20 years of GSP adoption. SGMA
may provide the regulatory means to
begin limiting the damage we are doing to
our aquifers, but significantly increasing
managed aquifer recharge to reverse
overdraft and to restore and refill our
underground reservoirs will have to be
part of the solution. Achieving this will
require a strategy to increase coordination
by local, state and federal agencies,
remove barriers, and define necessary
actions, including financing. Clearly,
groundwater is a local issue to be managed
by locals, but achieving the objective of
recharging California's depleted aquifers
and increasing storage statewide will
call for state and federal leadership and
actions beyond local abilities and controls.
Considering that many of the depleted

aquifers in California lie beneath the great
Central Valley farmlands, agriculture
will by necessity play a key role in
providing solutions.

The global picture
Water scarcity is a growing issue,
and we need to do all we can by using
the whole portfolio of management
options to address scarcity. In June
2016 in Mexico City, the International
Association of Hydrogeologists held
the Ninth International Symposium on
Managed Aquifer Recharge. As part of
the ISMAR9 objectives, the National
Water Commission of Mexico made the
decision to develop a Call to Action for
Sustainable Groundwater Management
Policy Directives (http://www.ismar9.
org). These directives include recognition
of aquifers as critical resources; the
need to halt chronic depletion, better
understand aquifer systems, sustainably
manage groundwater and for stakeholder
involvement; and that managed
aquifer recharge should be greatly
increased globally.
Certainly MAR is one of the key
elements to help manage our surface water
and groundwater resources together.
One thing is for sure - we will be busy
in the coming years working to become
sustainable in one of our most critical
resources - water. ■
Tim Parker is an independent technical
consultant providing groundwater
management services to public and private
sector clients. Tim serves as director on
Groundwater Resources Association of
California, International Association of
Hydrogeologists U.S. Chapter and National
Ground Water Association Scientists and
Engineers Division. He is principal writer
on Sustainability from the Ground Up,
Groundwater Management in California
(ACWA 2011), and co-authored Potential
Groundwater Quality Impacts Resulting from
Geologic Carbon Sequestration (WRF 2009),
and California Groundwater Management
(GRA 2005). Contact: tim@pg-tim.com.

References
DWRa 2017. http://www.water.ca.gov/
waterconditions/ accessed on May 5, 2017.
DWRb 2017. http://water.ca.gov/waterconditions/
docs/a3065_Drought_8page_v9_FINALsm.pdf
accessed on May 5, 2017.

Volume 19 * Number 5 www.awra.org * 19


http://www.ismar9.org http://www.bit.ly/1RSWmT1 http://www.water.ca.gov/waterconditions/ http://water.ca.gov/waterconditions/docs/a3065_Drought_8page_v9_FINALsm.pdf http://www.awra.org

Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017

President’s Message
Growing Up…with Managed Aquifer Recharge
Aquifer Storage and Recovery as Means to
The Regulatory Environment of Managed
The ASCE-EWRI Standard Guidelines
Managed Aquifer Recharge:
Managed Aquifer Recharge: A Global Perspective
What’s Up with Water? Sisyphus, Heraclitus and WOTUS
The New Economics of Water: Reducing CO2 Emissions in the Bay Delta Could Reverse Erosion
Domestic Well Aquifer Storage and Recovery Using Seasonal Springs
Philosophy and Ethics: The Rio Grande and the Ganges Rivers: How Human ‘Success’ is Choking the Life out of Two Great River-Spirits
ASR: Aquifer Storage Rescues a Small Water Supply District
Putting Aquifers to Work: MAR Applications in Nutrient Removal
Summer Conference Recap
Harvesting Glacial Meltwater with Managed Aquifer Recharge
AWRA State Section and Student Chapter News
In Memoriam: Peter E. Black
Herbert Scholarship Award Recipients for 2017-2018 Announced
August JAWRA Highlights
2017-2018 Editorial Calendar
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - intro
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - cover1
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - cover2
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - 3
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - 4
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - President’s Message
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - Growing Up…with Managed Aquifer Recharge
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - 7
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - Aquifer Storage and Recovery as Means to
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - 9
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - 10
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - The Regulatory Environment of Managed
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - 12
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - 13
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - The ASCE-EWRI Standard Guidelines
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - 15
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - 16
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - Managed Aquifer Recharge:
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - 18
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - 19
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - Managed Aquifer Recharge: A Global Perspective
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - 21
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - 22
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - 23
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - 24
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - 25
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - 26
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - 27
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - 28
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - 29
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - What’s Up with Water? Sisyphus, Heraclitus and WOTUS
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - 31
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - The New Economics of Water: Reducing CO2 Emissions in the Bay Delta Could Reverse Erosion
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - Philosophy and Ethics: The Rio Grande and the Ganges Rivers: How Human ‘Success’ is Choking the Life out of Two Great River-Spirits
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - ASR: Aquifer Storage Rescues a Small Water Supply District
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - 35
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - Summer Conference Recap
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - 37
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - AWRA State Section and Student Chapter News
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - In Memoriam: Peter E. Black
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - Herbert Scholarship Award Recipients for 2017-2018 Announced
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - 41
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - 2017-2018 Editorial Calendar
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - cover3
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - cover4
http://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/AWRAS/AWRAS0319
http://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/AWRAS/AWRAS0219
http://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/AWRAS/AWRAS0119
http://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/AWRAS/AWRAS0618
http://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/AWRAS/AWRAS0518
http://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/AWRAS/AWRAS0418
http://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/AWRAS/AWRAS0318
http://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/AWRAS/AWRAS0218
http://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/AWRAS/AWRAS0118
http://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/AWRAS/AWRAS0617
http://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/AWRAS/AWRAS0517
http://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/AWRAS/AWRAS0417
http://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/AWRAS/AWRAS0317
http://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/AWRAS/AWRAS0217
http://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/AWRAS/AWRAS0117
http://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/AWRAS/AWRAS0616
http://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/AWRAS/AWRAS0516
http://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/AWRAS/AWARS0416
http://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/AWRAS/AWRAS0316
http://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/AWRAS/AWRAS0216
http://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/AWRAS/AWRAS0116
http://www.nxtbookMEDIA.com