Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - 37

RESPONDING TO CLIMATE change is complicated by the scale, complexity and inherent uncertainty
of the problem, from changes in spatial and temporal variations in the components of the hydrologic
cycle; increasing number, intensity and geographic variability of storm events; sea level rise and salinity
changes due to temperature increases and glacial melting; to acidification. Climate change adaptation,
mitigation and community resilience must use the best available science while managing uncertainty.
Challenges remain both in developing the scientific, and scientifically rigorous, information necessary
to support water resources adaptation planning, and in the timeliness to respond to inquiry. As noted
in the American Meteorological Society's Statement on Climate Science is Core to Science Education,
"Because of the skeptical nature of scientists, new ideas are accepted very slowly and only after a great deal
of scrutiny. In fact, what authority science achieves is based on the openness by which scientific results are
presented for review, evaluation and additional testing." Managers and policy makers also often struggle
with translating information produced by the scientific
community for use in decision-making. Collaborative
solutions involving scientists, managers and other
Climate change
stakeholders are essential to ensure management
adaptation, mitigation
and policy decisions are informed by the best available
science, and that the scientific community in turn has a
and community resilience
strong awareness of managers' and policy makers' highest
must use the best
priority needs.
The AWRA 2017 Summer Specialty Conference
available science while
on Climate Change Solutions: Collaborative
Science, Policy and Planning for Sustainable Water
managing uncertainty.
Management brought together water professionals
with diverse backgrounds in physical, biological and
social sciences, managers, planners, policy makers, educators and other backgrounds come together to
discuss complex issues that cannot be solved by any one professional sector. Twenty-two technical sessions
highlighted federal, state, local and international issues and responses; vulnerability and adaptation
assessments; data and tools to support decision making; stakeholder collaboration, outreach and education;
and facility and watershed scale resiliency. Additionally, conference attendees participated in a World
Café-inspired Chewing on Climate Change Discussion Lunch focusing on identification of the highest
priority issues, where outreach and education could improve the general public's understanding, increasing
policy maker understanding, expanding personal knowledge and future support that AWRA could provide
with respect to water resources, water resources management and climate change.
Highest priority concerns included understanding and communicating uncertainty, including what is
not uncertain; the need to better work across discipline silos; a better understanding of vegetation patterns
and shifts, impacts on agriculture, associated water needs vs. availability and food security; when to make
investments and quantifying the costs of inaction; sea level rise and effects and mitigation of saltwater
intrusion, infrastructure, weather events, supply scarcity and a science-informed approach to the policies
of building and rebuilding in flood-prone areas; the need for localized to regional climate models; and
methods for identifying, selecting and using the magnitude of data and tools available.
Communication themes emerged around the need for long-term thinking, planning, funding and
managing; challenges reaching diverse communities; messaging, branding and social media usage;
developing and leveraging local, regional and state collaborations for program development and
implementation; information sharing between small communities; understanding of rates development,
needs and decisions; and highlighting impacts of climate change that are already being felt.
The future of the science and policy around climate change still is evolving. Continued research,
collaboration and communication across scientific and social disciplines, and outreach to and working with
policy-makers, planners, and the public across local, regional, state, and national levels will facilitate water
resource resilience and management in the coming years. ■
Lisa Engelman is an independent consultant, having supported environmental clients for over 20 years. She
served as chair of the AWRA 2017 Summer Specialty Conference, and represents AWRA as alternate to the
Renewable Natural Resources Foundation (RNRF) Board and Advisory Committee on Water Information (ACWI)
Water Resources Adaptation to Climate Change workgroup. Contact: engelman.lisa@gmail.com.
Volume 19 * Number 5 www.awra.org * 37


http://www.awra.org

Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017

President’s Message
Growing Up…with Managed Aquifer Recharge
Aquifer Storage and Recovery as Means to
The Regulatory Environment of Managed
The ASCE-EWRI Standard Guidelines
Managed Aquifer Recharge:
Managed Aquifer Recharge: A Global Perspective
What’s Up with Water? Sisyphus, Heraclitus and WOTUS
The New Economics of Water: Reducing CO2 Emissions in the Bay Delta Could Reverse Erosion
Domestic Well Aquifer Storage and Recovery Using Seasonal Springs
Philosophy and Ethics: The Rio Grande and the Ganges Rivers: How Human ‘Success’ is Choking the Life out of Two Great River-Spirits
ASR: Aquifer Storage Rescues a Small Water Supply District
Putting Aquifers to Work: MAR Applications in Nutrient Removal
Summer Conference Recap
Harvesting Glacial Meltwater with Managed Aquifer Recharge
AWRA State Section and Student Chapter News
In Memoriam: Peter E. Black
Herbert Scholarship Award Recipients for 2017-2018 Announced
August JAWRA Highlights
2017-2018 Editorial Calendar
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - intro
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - cover1
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - cover2
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - 3
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - 4
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - President’s Message
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - Growing Up…with Managed Aquifer Recharge
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - 7
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - Aquifer Storage and Recovery as Means to
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - 9
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - 10
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - The Regulatory Environment of Managed
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - 12
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - 13
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - The ASCE-EWRI Standard Guidelines
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - 15
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - 16
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - Managed Aquifer Recharge:
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - 18
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - 19
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - Managed Aquifer Recharge: A Global Perspective
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - 21
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - 22
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - 23
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - 24
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - 25
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - 26
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - 27
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - 28
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - 29
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - What’s Up with Water? Sisyphus, Heraclitus and WOTUS
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - 31
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - The New Economics of Water: Reducing CO2 Emissions in the Bay Delta Could Reverse Erosion
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - Philosophy and Ethics: The Rio Grande and the Ganges Rivers: How Human ‘Success’ is Choking the Life out of Two Great River-Spirits
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - ASR: Aquifer Storage Rescues a Small Water Supply District
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - 35
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - Summer Conference Recap
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - 37
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - AWRA State Section and Student Chapter News
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - In Memoriam: Peter E. Black
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - Herbert Scholarship Award Recipients for 2017-2018 Announced
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - 41
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - 2017-2018 Editorial Calendar
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - cover3
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - cover4
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