Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - 7

Figure 2: Thomas E. Levy Groundwater Replentishment Facility, southern California. [Courtesy
Maureen Perry, Coachella Valley Water District, California]

Managed aquifer recharge
So whether they knew it or not, Nassau
County was an early adopter of managed
aquifer recharge (MAR), the intentional
recharge (typically by infiltration basins or
injection wells) of aquifers for later recovery
or other purposes (environmental, dilution
of pollutants, streamflow augmentation,
etc.). MAR is sometimes called aquifer
storage and recovery (ASR; sometimes the
'and' is omitted) when the water is being
recharged for later recovery via the same
wells used for recharge. In the old days we
simply called it artificial recharge (AR).
In the old old days it was referred to as
'cyclic storage,' a term coined by legendary
civil engineer Harvey O. Banks, the first
director of the California Department of
Water Resources (thanks to the University
of Washington's Steve Burges for reminding
me of that). I view MAR as a general term
that encompasses all of the above.
The first recorded MAR attempt in the
United States is believed to be the water
spreading operation conducted by the
Denver Union Water Company in Colorado
in 1889. California followed with successful
operations initiated in 1896 (Santiago Creek)
and 1900 (Santa Ana River). These and other
early attempts are described in two 1930s
technical publications by authors affiliated
with the U.S. Department of Agriculture,
A.T. Mitchelson and Dean Muckel (see
http://bit.ly/2uF9NmJ).

It was appropriate that I learned MAR
at the University of Arizona, which at the
time was heavily involved in researching
artificial recharge via basins and pits. My
curiosity was piqued by that work and my
PhD advisor, the late Gene Simpson. When
I expressed interest in artificial recharge,
Gene directed me to the work of Don
Warner, who was at the then-University
of Missouri-Rolla (now the Missouri
University of Science and Technology). His
specialty was AR via wells. Good stuff!
I left MAR in the late 1970s but was
brought back into the fold about 30
years later, largely by my co-editor and
colleague, Maria T. Gibson, who is doing
her PhD dissertation on the topic and has
rekindled my interest. This topical issue
of Water Resources IMPACT is one of
the results of my newfound enthusiasm.
Read on for a brief overview of the articles
contained herein.

The issue
The first three articles set the stage.
Frederick Bloetscher of Florida Atlantic
University provides an excellent overview
of ASR, some history and how it can be a
valuable water management tool. He also
cites some of the challenges ASR faces.
Co-editor Maria T. Gibson then describes
the regulatory environment that currently
retards expansion of MAR on a nationwide
basis. Have an aquifer that straddles state and

EPA regional boundaries and is targeted for
an MAR project? You may need some luck!
Gordon McCurry then weighs in with an
important publication slated for release in
2018: The ASCE-EWRI Standard Guidelines
on Managed Aquifer Recharge. This updated
(first published in 2001) volume published
by the American Society of Civil Engineers
- Environmental and Water Resources
Institute is long overdue and will be
welcomed by those involved in all aspects of
the MAR industry. An outstanding team of
experts was engaged for this project.
Next up is Timothy K. Parker, a
California consulting hydrogeologist with
much experience in MAR. Tim discusses
the California MAR scene including the
new Sustainable Groundwater Management
Act (SGMA) and introduces the global
aspects. At that point Nienke Ansems of the
International Groundwater Centre (IGRAC)
in The Netherlands holds court. She
highlights the global scene and enumerates
the actions necessary to increase global
acceptance of MAR.
So you think MAR applies only to large
systems? Think again! Julianne Robinson,
Todd Jarvis and Desirée Tullos report on
a fascinating case study of MAR using a
single domestic well and a seasonal spring.
Bob Mansfield then tells us of a small
(2,000 customers) Oregon utility that
used ASR to provide affordable storage
in lieu of an aboveground storage tank.
Christopher Brown concludes the case
studies by elucidating a little-known aspect
of MAR: that of providing some measure of
water treatment. He presents two studies of
nutrient removal that will be of interest to
MAR wonks and others as well.
In the very last paper, yours truly
speculates on the possibility of using MAR
to store glacial meltwater and harvest some
of that 'excess runoff'. ■
Michael E. Campana is professor of
Hydrogeology and Water Management at
Oregon State University and Technical Director
of AWRA. He is also president of the NGWA
Foundation and the Ann Campana Judge
Foundation and chair of the Oregon Water
Resources Department's Groundwater Advisory
Committee. Campana enjoys many things, but
mostly he enjoys his status as an inveterate
WaterWonk. He blogs at www.waterwired.org
and Tweets @WaterWired. Contact:
aquadoc@oregonstate.edu.
Volume 19 * Number 5 www.awra.org * 7


http://www.waterwired.org http://www.bit.ly/2uF9NmJ http://www.awra.org

Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017

President’s Message
Growing Up…with Managed Aquifer Recharge
Aquifer Storage and Recovery as Means to
The Regulatory Environment of Managed
The ASCE-EWRI Standard Guidelines
Managed Aquifer Recharge:
Managed Aquifer Recharge: A Global Perspective
What’s Up with Water? Sisyphus, Heraclitus and WOTUS
The New Economics of Water: Reducing CO2 Emissions in the Bay Delta Could Reverse Erosion
Domestic Well Aquifer Storage and Recovery Using Seasonal Springs
Philosophy and Ethics: The Rio Grande and the Ganges Rivers: How Human ‘Success’ is Choking the Life out of Two Great River-Spirits
ASR: Aquifer Storage Rescues a Small Water Supply District
Putting Aquifers to Work: MAR Applications in Nutrient Removal
Summer Conference Recap
Harvesting Glacial Meltwater with Managed Aquifer Recharge
AWRA State Section and Student Chapter News
In Memoriam: Peter E. Black
Herbert Scholarship Award Recipients for 2017-2018 Announced
August JAWRA Highlights
2017-2018 Editorial Calendar
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - intro
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - cover1
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - cover2
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - 3
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - 4
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - President’s Message
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - Growing Up…with Managed Aquifer Recharge
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - 7
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - Aquifer Storage and Recovery as Means to
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - 9
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - 10
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - The Regulatory Environment of Managed
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - 12
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - 13
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - The ASCE-EWRI Standard Guidelines
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - 15
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - 16
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - Managed Aquifer Recharge:
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - 18
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - 19
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - Managed Aquifer Recharge: A Global Perspective
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - 21
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - 22
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - 23
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - 24
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - 25
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - 26
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - 27
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - 28
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - 29
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - What’s Up with Water? Sisyphus, Heraclitus and WOTUS
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - 31
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - The New Economics of Water: Reducing CO2 Emissions in the Bay Delta Could Reverse Erosion
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - Philosophy and Ethics: The Rio Grande and the Ganges Rivers: How Human ‘Success’ is Choking the Life out of Two Great River-Spirits
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - ASR: Aquifer Storage Rescues a Small Water Supply District
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - 35
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - Summer Conference Recap
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - 37
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - AWRA State Section and Student Chapter News
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - In Memoriam: Peter E. Black
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - Herbert Scholarship Award Recipients for 2017-2018 Announced
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - 41
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - 2017-2018 Editorial Calendar
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - cover3
Water Resources - IMPACT - September 2017 - cover4
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