BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 11


distribution. Many of these systems are decades old
and not well-maintained. Under these circumstances,
in addition to wasting energy, these systems can
cause widely varying temperatures within a building,
with uncomfortably cold or hot rooms.
The dataset also indicated that more than 90
percent of cooling systems are non-central systems.
This poses additional challenges because window
and through-wall unit openings allow heat to leak in
the winter, exacerbating waste and discomfort.
The city's existing policies and programs created
a solid foundation for reducing energy use, but they
were not enough to reach 80x50. Therefore, the
TWG identified the systems-specific opportunities
in existing buildings that, if implemented, would
place buildings on a pathway to achieving 80x50.
TWG members helped develop and analyze nearly
100 low-to-medium difficulty energy conservation
measures (ECMs) across all system types. If every
applicable building immediately implemented every
one of these cost-effective ECMs, building-based
GHG emissions would be reduced by 33 percent,
yielding a 21 percent citywide reduction in GHG
emissions from a 2005 baseline.
The TWG also analyzed deep retrofit strategies
for eight building typologies, covering roughly 60

percent of New York City's built square footage. The
city created energy models of each of these typical
buildings based on the most common construction
methods and building systems within each typology,
which were then calibrated to real buildings based on
LL87. The results of this analyses show that existing
technologies and strategies could potentially reduce
energy use and GHG emissions by 40-to-60 percent
in typical New York City buildings, with greater
possible reductions given a significantly cleaner
electric grid.
By 2050, the city anticipates that the growth
in built square footage from new construction
will increase GHG emissions from the building
sector by 8.9 percent, or 3.2 MtCO 2e, under
today's standards. To determine how future
iterations of the city's energy code might impact
this new development, the city projected future
GHG reductions based on historic ASHRAE 90.1
updates, using U.S. Department of Energy studies
completed by the Pacific Northwest National
Laboratories (PNNL). 3 The city correlated PNNL's
energy use profiles of six prototype buildings in
New York State, with permit data from the NYC
Department of Buildings. Based on this analysis,
the projected increase in GHG emissions from new

GHG EMISSIONS
DISTRIBUTION. SOURCE:
ONE CITY BUILT TO LAST
TECHNICAL WORKING
GROUP REPORT:
TRANSFORMING NEW
YORK CITY BUILDINGS FOR
A LOW-CARBON FUTURE.

21%

4%

52%

25%

Space
Heating
42%

Domestic
Hot Water
Plug
Loads/Misc

20%

Lighting
Other

74%

15%
16%

Space
Cooling

22%

6%

7%

15%

5%
9%
4%
Multifamily

9%

11%

Ventilation

8%

Conveyance

8%

Process

8%

Loads

5%
4%
Commercial

Citywide

NESEA.ORG * 11


http://www.NESEA.ORG

Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016

From the Executive Director and Board Chair
New York City is Transforming Buildings for a Low Carbon Future
Does Electric Grid 2.0 Mean Energy Democracy?
Resiliency for Affordable Multifamily Housing: What We Have Learned and What We Still Need to Know
Break It or Lose It: Thermal Bridging in Rainscreen Systems
My PEI is Better Than Your PEI
Life Cycle Assessment at the Speed of Design
From Theory to Reality: Our Journey Toward Sustainability Building a Net Zero Home
Solar Policy in the Northeast: What’s New, What’s Next?
BuildingEnergy Green Pages
Index to Advertisers / Ad.com
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - cover1
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - cover2
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 3
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 4
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 5
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - From the Executive Director and Board Chair
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 7
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 8
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 9
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - New York City is Transforming Buildings for a Low Carbon Future
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 11
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 12
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 13
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 14
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 15
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 16
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 17
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 18
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 19
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - Does Electric Grid 2.0 Mean Energy Democracy?
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 21
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 22
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 23
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 24
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 25
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - Resiliency for Affordable Multifamily Housing: What We Have Learned and What We Still Need to Know
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 27
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 28
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 29
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 30
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 31
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 32
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 33
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - Break It or Lose It: Thermal Bridging in Rainscreen Systems
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 35
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 36
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 37
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 38
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 39
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - My PEI is Better Than Your PEI
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 41
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 42
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 43
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - Life Cycle Assessment at the Speed of Design
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 45
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 46
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 47
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - From Theory to Reality: Our Journey Toward Sustainability Building a Net Zero Home
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 49
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 50
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - Solar Policy in the Northeast: What’s New, What’s Next?
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 52
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 53
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - BuildingEnergy Green Pages
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 55
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 56
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 57
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 58
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 59
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 60
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 61
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 62
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 63
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 64
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 65
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 66
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 67
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 68
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 69
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 70
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 71
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 72
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 73
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 74
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 75
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 76
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 77
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 78
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 79
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 80
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - Index to Advertisers / Ad.com
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 82
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - cover3
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - cover4
http://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/ENEB/ENEB0118
http://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/ENEB/ENEB0217
http://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/ENEB/ENEB0117
http://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/ENEB/ENEB0216
http://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/ENEB/ENEB0116
http://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/ENEB/ENEB0215
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