BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 12


construction would be 2.2 MtCO 2e. This reduces
emissions by roughly 1 MtCO 2e from business as
usual, but falls short of the reductions ultimately
needed. Moreover, there is some doubt that
these levels of efficiencies could be achieved,
as achieving efficiencies from individual pieces
of equipment is reaching a point of diminishing
returns.
WHERE WE GO FROM HERE
The city is already in the process of adopting
the best practices and cost-effective ECMs
identified by the TWG. In addition to reducing
GHG emissions, based on city multipliers, these
ECMs have the potential to yield $2.7 billion in
energy savings and create approximately 15,000
direct construction-related jobs.
The city will also require improved maintenance
of heating distribution systems, including specific
requirements for steam systems, in all large and
mid-sized buildings. This improvement has the
potential to reduce GHG emissions by 1.4 MtCO2e, or

four percent from current building-based emissions
- which represents one of the most significant
potential impacts of the ECMs analyzed.
The city is leading by example, and has
committed to retrofitting all public buildings with
significant energy use by 2025. Finally, the city is
developing a simple template for individual buildings
that will identify deep retrofit options and will
require owners of large and mid-sized buildings to
report the results in their energy audits. This will
allow owners and decision-makers to factor the
results into capital planning cycles. The NYC Retrofit
Accelerator is already incorporating these measures
into the support they offer building owners and
decision makers.
Improvements to the design and construction
of new buildings must also be part of 80x50. To
lead by example, beginning in 2017, all new capital
projects for city-owned properties will meet an
energy performance target of 50 percent below
today's median energy use. The city will require
all new privately-owned buildings to report on an

Citywide Building GHG Reduction from 2014 (%)

CONTINUED ON PAGE 15

1.50

2-pipe - Install orifice
plates + indoor feedback

Incremental Cost

1-pipe - Complete comprehensive
upgrade w/ master venting + trap
maintenance

Total Cost

2-pipe- Complete comprehensive
upgrade w/ orifice plates + trap
maintenance

1.25

1-pipe - Conduct master venting + install indoor feedback
1.00

0.75

2-pipe - Conduct regular trap maintenance
0.50

1-pipe - Conduct regular trap maintenance

0.25

PTAC- Complete comprehensive upgrade w/
digital controls and sensors +
indoor feedback + trap maintenance

PTAC- Install indoor feedback
with vacuum system RCx

PTAC- Conduct regular trap maintenance
0.00

0.00

0.25

0.50

0.75

1.00

1.25

1.50

1.75

2.00

Measure Cost per Building Square Foot ($/SF)

EXAMPLE OF GHG AND COST IMPACT ANALYSIS: STEAM HEATING DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM EFFICIENCY MEASURES.
SOURCE: ONE CITY BUILT TO LAST TECHNICAL WORKING GROUP REPORT: TRANSFORMING NEW YORK CITY
BUILDINGS FOR A LOW-CARBON FUTURE.

12 * BUILDINGENERGY VOL. 35 NO. 2 | FALL 2016



Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016

From the Executive Director and Board Chair
New York City is Transforming Buildings for a Low Carbon Future
Does Electric Grid 2.0 Mean Energy Democracy?
Resiliency for Affordable Multifamily Housing: What We Have Learned and What We Still Need to Know
Break It or Lose It: Thermal Bridging in Rainscreen Systems
My PEI is Better Than Your PEI
Life Cycle Assessment at the Speed of Design
From Theory to Reality: Our Journey Toward Sustainability Building a Net Zero Home
Solar Policy in the Northeast: What’s New, What’s Next?
BuildingEnergy Green Pages
Index to Advertisers / Ad.com
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - cover1
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - cover2
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 3
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 4
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 5
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - From the Executive Director and Board Chair
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 7
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 8
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 9
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - New York City is Transforming Buildings for a Low Carbon Future
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 11
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 12
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 13
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 14
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 15
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 16
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 17
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 18
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 19
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - Does Electric Grid 2.0 Mean Energy Democracy?
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 21
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 22
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 23
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 24
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 25
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - Resiliency for Affordable Multifamily Housing: What We Have Learned and What We Still Need to Know
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 27
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 28
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 29
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 30
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 31
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 32
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 33
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - Break It or Lose It: Thermal Bridging in Rainscreen Systems
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 35
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 36
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 37
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 38
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 39
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - My PEI is Better Than Your PEI
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 41
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 42
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 43
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - Life Cycle Assessment at the Speed of Design
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 45
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 46
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 47
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - From Theory to Reality: Our Journey Toward Sustainability Building a Net Zero Home
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 49
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 50
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - Solar Policy in the Northeast: What’s New, What’s Next?
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 52
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 53
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - BuildingEnergy Green Pages
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 55
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 56
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 57
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 58
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 59
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 60
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 61
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 62
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 63
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 64
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 65
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 66
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 67
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 68
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 69
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 70
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 71
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 72
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 73
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 74
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 75
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 76
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 77
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 78
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 79
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 80
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - Index to Advertisers / Ad.com
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 82
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - cover3
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - cover4
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