BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 15


35.7

Total
Building
GHG
Emissions
(2014)

2.0

Envelope

1.0

Cooling

1.2

3.5

0.9

Domestic
Heating
Heating
Hot Water Distribution Equipment

0.7

Lighting

1.8

33%

0.5

24.1

Plug Loads Ventilation Remaining
Building
GHG
Emissions

TECHNICAL POTENTIAL FOR GHG REDUCTIONS FROM ECMS BY BUILDING SYSTEM (MTCO2E). SOURCE: ONE CITY BUILT TO LAST TECHNICAL
WORKING GROUP REPORT: TRANSFORMING NEW YORK CITY BUILDINGS FOR A LOW-CARBON FUTURE.

3.24 MtCO2e

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 12

2018
2021
2027 2024
2030
2033
2036
2039
2042
2045
2048

2050
Buildings-based
Emissions from
New Construction
Under Current
Energy Code

2.16 MtCO2e

2050
Buildings-based
Emissions from
New Construction
Under Incremental
Improvements on
3-Year Revision
Cycle

PROJECTED INCREMENTAL COSTS OF NEW ENERGY CODE WITH SCENARIO OF
REPLICATING HISTORICAL CODE ADVANCEMENTS. SOURCE: ONE CITY BUILT TO LAST
TECHNICAL WORKING GROUP REPORT: TRANSFORMING NEW YORK CITY BUILDINGS
FOR A LOW-CARBON FUTURE.

energy performance metric by 2019 and meet an
energy performance design target by 2022. This new
paradigm will require a holistic approach to building
design that will yield substantially better energy use
performance.
The city is working with stakeholders to create
a new metric to assess whole building energy
performance that takes into account differences
in occupancy and space use and to develop proof
of concept across the city's building typologies. To
achieve the full potential of GHG reductions, the
city will also work to remove barriers to investing
in energy efficiency and expand opportunities
to encourage these investments. All buildings,
including small, mid-sized, and historic buildings, will
need to contribute to the city's commitment.
Both professionals and trades will need to be
trained in new methods and technologies. Increased
coordination between landlords and tenants on
energy efficiency must become standard practice,
and the City is using the Carbon Challenge program
to convene leaders to develop replicable solutions
to the barriers that can prevent these types of
partnerships. Investments in energy efficiency
should ultimately yield operational cost savings that
will lower housing costs for New Yorkers, but access
to financing options will need to be expanded.
Achieving 80x50 in New York City is no small
task. Significant changes in the way buildings are
constructed and operated will be required. New
York City's combination of data, deep analysis and
expert stakeholder participation has produced
a comprehensive approach to building energy
strategies. Pairing these strategies with the
extensive support programs available to New York
City building owners, including the NYC Retrofit
NESEA.ORG * 15


http://www.NESEA.ORG

Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016

From the Executive Director and Board Chair
New York City is Transforming Buildings for a Low Carbon Future
Does Electric Grid 2.0 Mean Energy Democracy?
Resiliency for Affordable Multifamily Housing: What We Have Learned and What We Still Need to Know
Break It or Lose It: Thermal Bridging in Rainscreen Systems
My PEI is Better Than Your PEI
Life Cycle Assessment at the Speed of Design
From Theory to Reality: Our Journey Toward Sustainability Building a Net Zero Home
Solar Policy in the Northeast: What’s New, What’s Next?
BuildingEnergy Green Pages
Index to Advertisers / Ad.com
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - cover1
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - cover2
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 3
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 4
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 5
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - From the Executive Director and Board Chair
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 7
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 8
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 9
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - New York City is Transforming Buildings for a Low Carbon Future
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 11
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 12
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 13
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 14
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 15
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 16
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 17
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 18
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 19
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - Does Electric Grid 2.0 Mean Energy Democracy?
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 21
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 22
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 23
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 24
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 25
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - Resiliency for Affordable Multifamily Housing: What We Have Learned and What We Still Need to Know
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 27
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 28
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 29
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 30
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 31
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 32
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 33
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - Break It or Lose It: Thermal Bridging in Rainscreen Systems
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 35
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 36
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 37
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 38
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 39
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - My PEI is Better Than Your PEI
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 41
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 42
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 43
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - Life Cycle Assessment at the Speed of Design
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 45
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 46
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 47
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - From Theory to Reality: Our Journey Toward Sustainability Building a Net Zero Home
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 49
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 50
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - Solar Policy in the Northeast: What’s New, What’s Next?
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 52
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 53
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - BuildingEnergy Green Pages
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 55
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 56
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 57
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 58
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 59
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 60
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 61
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 62
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 63
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 64
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 65
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 66
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 67
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 68
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 69
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 70
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 71
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 72
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 73
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 74
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 75
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 76
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 77
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 78
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 79
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 80
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - Index to Advertisers / Ad.com
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 82
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - cover3
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - cover4
http://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/ENEB/ENEB0118
http://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/ENEB/ENEB0217
http://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/ENEB/ENEB0117
http://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/ENEB/ENEB0216
http://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/ENEB/ENEB0116
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