BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 22


In Hawaii,
rooftop
solar is so
affordable
compared
to utility
electric
prices that
more than
15 percent of
households
have already
installed
solar panels.

pricing that allows customers to offer their solar,
storage or demand reduction in service of a more
efficient electric grid. Hourly or "time of use"
pricing has already been shown to reduce energy
use at times of peak demand - and could be made
more powerful if it applied not just to reducing
consumption but also to increasing local energy
production.
We need financing tools accessible to all, so
that the $360 billion opportunity isn't confined to
those with a prime credit score. Many cooperative
utilities have already solved this problem,
offering their customers "on-bill repayment"
for investments in insulation, efficient furnaces
and water heaters, and even on-site solar. These
programs use on-time bill payment history rather
than credit scoring, giving the vast majority of
electric customers access to reduce and manage
their energy consumption.
Without these changes, we risk having many
(wealthier) utility customers cut the cord through
solar panels and storage even when they could
benefit (for reliability and economic reasons) from
a grid connection, leaving behind a less valuable
network and a more costly system.
So how do the rules change?
About one-quarter of Americans already
control their electric company as either a publiclyowned municipal or member-owned cooperative.
Some of these municipal and cooperative utilities
already use distributed technology and tap their

customers' interest in participating. Farmers
Electric Cooperative in Iowa is one of the top
utilities in the country in solar installed per
customer, much of it owned by customers. The
Georgetown, Texas municipal utility contracted
for 100 percent wind and solar power beginning in
2017. Customers of these utilities can vote in city
or board elections and pick leaders who will enable
local renewable energy generation.
For the remaining 75 percent of customers
served by investor-owned utilities, the path to
taking back power is less straightforward. These
companies increasingly abuse their publiclygranted monopoly to oppose the public interest in
having more renewable energy and local control.
Incumbent monopoly NV Energy, for example,
lobbied to end fair "net metering" compensation
for solar producers in Nevada. APS and Tucson
Electric Power in Arizona have similarly tried to
protect their monopoly by making customerowned solar less lucrative.
One exception to monopoly rule by investorowned utilities hints at a potential solution.
Green Mountain Power is an investor-owned
utility serving about three-quarters of Vermont
electric customers. It is the only electric company
with an alternative corporate structure (called
a certified B Corp., or benefit corporation) that
requires the utility to pursue greater social goods
in addition to shareholder profits, e.g. "to become
CONTINUED ON PAGE 24

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Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016

From the Executive Director and Board Chair
New York City is Transforming Buildings for a Low Carbon Future
Does Electric Grid 2.0 Mean Energy Democracy?
Resiliency for Affordable Multifamily Housing: What We Have Learned and What We Still Need to Know
Break It or Lose It: Thermal Bridging in Rainscreen Systems
My PEI is Better Than Your PEI
Life Cycle Assessment at the Speed of Design
From Theory to Reality: Our Journey Toward Sustainability Building a Net Zero Home
Solar Policy in the Northeast: What’s New, What’s Next?
BuildingEnergy Green Pages
Index to Advertisers / Ad.com
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - cover1
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - cover2
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 3
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 4
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 5
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - From the Executive Director and Board Chair
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 7
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 8
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 9
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - New York City is Transforming Buildings for a Low Carbon Future
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 11
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 12
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 13
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 14
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 15
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 16
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 17
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 18
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 19
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - Does Electric Grid 2.0 Mean Energy Democracy?
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 21
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 22
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 23
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 24
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 25
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - Resiliency for Affordable Multifamily Housing: What We Have Learned and What We Still Need to Know
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 27
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 28
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 29
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 30
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 31
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 32
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 33
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - Break It or Lose It: Thermal Bridging in Rainscreen Systems
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 35
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 36
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 37
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 38
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 39
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - My PEI is Better Than Your PEI
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 41
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 42
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 43
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - Life Cycle Assessment at the Speed of Design
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 45
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 46
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 47
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - From Theory to Reality: Our Journey Toward Sustainability Building a Net Zero Home
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 49
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 50
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - Solar Policy in the Northeast: What’s New, What’s Next?
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 52
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 53
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - BuildingEnergy Green Pages
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 55
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 56
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 57
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 58
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 59
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 60
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 61
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 62
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 63
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 64
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 65
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 66
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 67
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 68
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 69
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 70
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 71
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 72
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 73
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 74
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 75
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 76
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 77
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 78
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 79
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 80
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - Index to Advertisers / Ad.com
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 82
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - cover3
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - cover4
http://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/ENEB/ENEB0118
http://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/ENEB/ENEB0217
http://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/ENEB/ENEB0117
http://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/ENEB/ENEB0216
http://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/ENEB/ENEB0116
http://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/ENEB/ENEB0215
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