BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 28


FIGURE 6

FIGURE 7

FIGURE 8

RESILIENCY COSTS
New York University's Furman Center examined
the work that AIANY did and asked these questions:
* If flood-proofing measures were implemented,
what would it cost?
* How would flood-proofing measures
affect revenue?
* How could such measures be funded?
I was asked to partner in this line of inquiry. The
data collected demonstrated the vulnerability of the
affordable multifamily housing stock; 18 percent
of affected housing was market rate, while the
remainder was subsidized, stabilized, or public.
(see figure 6). Three case-study sites were selected,
and the Furman Center convened a workshop with
a number of people from the Post-Sandy Charrette,
along with experts in financing, costs, funding and
development to look at these issues. The resulting
28 * BUILDINGENERGY VOL. 35 NO. 2 | FALL 2016

report, Multifamily Housing in NYC and Other Urban
Areas Remains Vulnerable to Flooding, can be
downloaded at http://furmancenter.org/thestoop/
entry/three-years-post-sandy-multifamily-housingin-nyc-and-other-urban-areas-sti.
To help preserve needed affordable housing
currently located in the floodplain (see figures 7 and 8),
the report recommended that:
* FEMA should modify the guidelines for its
National Flood Insurance Program to allow for
coverage of existing multifamily buildings.
* New York City should expand its Flood Resilience
Zoning Text Amendment to cover buildings
in the 500-year floodplain. (This was also a
recommendation of the
Post-Sandy Housing Task Force.)
* NYC should revisit its existing rehabilitation
programs to ensure that resilience measures
can be readily funded; and it should require that
buildings in the 100-year and 500-year floodplains
that receive city assistance have adequate
emergency and resilience plans.
One of the major issues raised, and not fully
answered, is how resiliency measures are funded.
With the exception of post-disaster rounds of
funding, there are typically no mechanisms in place
to provide funding for resiliency. One clear path is to
tie resiliency funding to energy retrofit programs,
which, in New York, are run by the New York State
Energy Research and Development Authority
(NYSERDA). Although NYSERDA cannot legally fund
resiliency measures, they can provide information
and links on their website relating to resiliency
issues when doing energy upgrades. One example of
how this might work is when someone is replacing a
boiler they are pointed to a resource demonstrating
that it can be relocated for resiliency, often at a
small additional cost.
CONTINUED ON PAGE 30


http://www.furmancenter.org/thestoop/entry/three-year-sand-multifmaily-housing-in-nyc-and-other-urban-areas-sti

Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016

From the Executive Director and Board Chair
New York City is Transforming Buildings for a Low Carbon Future
Does Electric Grid 2.0 Mean Energy Democracy?
Resiliency for Affordable Multifamily Housing: What We Have Learned and What We Still Need to Know
Break It or Lose It: Thermal Bridging in Rainscreen Systems
My PEI is Better Than Your PEI
Life Cycle Assessment at the Speed of Design
From Theory to Reality: Our Journey Toward Sustainability Building a Net Zero Home
Solar Policy in the Northeast: What’s New, What’s Next?
BuildingEnergy Green Pages
Index to Advertisers / Ad.com
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - cover1
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - cover2
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 3
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 4
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 5
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - From the Executive Director and Board Chair
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 7
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 8
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 9
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - New York City is Transforming Buildings for a Low Carbon Future
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 11
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 12
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 13
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 14
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 15
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 16
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 17
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 18
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 19
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - Does Electric Grid 2.0 Mean Energy Democracy?
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 21
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 22
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 23
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 24
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 25
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - Resiliency for Affordable Multifamily Housing: What We Have Learned and What We Still Need to Know
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 27
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 28
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 29
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 30
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 31
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 32
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 33
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - Break It or Lose It: Thermal Bridging in Rainscreen Systems
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 35
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 36
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 37
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 38
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 39
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - My PEI is Better Than Your PEI
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 41
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 42
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 43
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - Life Cycle Assessment at the Speed of Design
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 45
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 46
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 47
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - From Theory to Reality: Our Journey Toward Sustainability Building a Net Zero Home
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 49
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 50
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - Solar Policy in the Northeast: What’s New, What’s Next?
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 52
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 53
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - BuildingEnergy Green Pages
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 55
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 56
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 57
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 58
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 59
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 60
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 61
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 62
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 63
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BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 65
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BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 67
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BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 69
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 70
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 71
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 72
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 73
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BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 75
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 76
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 77
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 78
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 79
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 80
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - Index to Advertisers / Ad.com
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 82
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - cover3
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - cover4
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