BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 40


FEATURE: OCCUPANT BEHAVIOR

MY PEI IS BETTER
THAN YOUR PEI
USING PERSONAL ENERGY INTENSITY (PEI)
TO INFLUENCE OCCUPANT BEHAVIOR AND
MAXIMIZE ENERGY PROJECT IMPACT
BY SAHEEL
CHANDRANI

PEER-REVIEWED BY
SUSAN MAZUR-STOMMEN

D

espite the fact that owners,
developers, consulting engineers and
vendors have all endeavored to design,
build and operate the most efficient
buildings possible over the past
decade, our buildings continue to consume almost
50 percent of all energy in the U.S., according to the
United States Energy Information Administration
(US EIA). We have developed and adopted various
building codes, energy efficiency standards and
design methodologies, all of which contribute to
the increased efficiency of our buildings. We have
successfully tackled large, complex engineering
problems. We have developed and implemented
technologies that drive peak performance of our
mechanical and electrical systems. We have done
all these things in service of a common end goal: to
reduce the overall energy impact of our buildings on
the environment. We hold our buildings' operational
staff accountable for energy performance, but we
should also be providing building occupants with
the education and tools they need to reduce their
energy intensity. This is the next frontier in keeping
building performance at peak levels.
The U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) estimates
that approximately 1.85 million square feet of green
building space is being rated through its Leadership
in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) system
on a daily basis. In addition to LEED, Energy Star,
Green Globes and the Living Building Challenge are
all highly effective green building rating systems.
These processes and design methodologies ensure
that the core operations of our buildings are as
efficient as possible from a design perspective.
Through various upgrades and improvements, we've

40 * BUILDINGENERGY VOL. 35 NO. 2 | FALL 2016

also learned to keep our buildings performing their
best as they age.
An often overlooked, yet important, factor to
maintaining peak operating performance is the human
element. We have traditionally designed spaces with
centralized and generalized control, leaving the vast
majority of occupants without the ability to control
their individual spaces. Since our building occupants
impact overall energy spend tremendously, it is critical to
develop Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) that quantify
the successes of various energy programs and strategies
vis-à-vis building occupants.
We have developed the Energy Use Intensity
(EUI), which compares the total kBtu of a building
with its gross square footage, allowing us to compare
different types and sizes of buildings to one another.
We can use a similar concept to compare energy
use of individual occupants of a building. This metric
is known as Personal Energy Intensity (PEI), and is
measured in energy dollars per occupant per day.
A recent analysis of approximately 50 buildings
in New York City, all commercial office buildings
with multiple tenant types, and all with Building
Automation Systems (BAS's), revealed an average
PEI of $13.25 in energy spent per occupant per day.
Occupant behavior in these buildings ranged from
a PEI in excess of $27.62 in buildings with the least
efficient occupants, to a PEI of less than $6.19 for
for the best performers. The data used for these
calculations is publicly available through the following
websites: http://benchmarking.cityofnewyork.
us/, https://www.energystar.gov/buildings/
facility-owners-and-managers/existing-buildings/
use-portfolio-manager, and http://www.eia.gov/
consumption/commercial/.


http://www.benchmarking.cityofnewyork.us/,www.energystar.gov/buildings/facilty-owners-and-managers/existing-buildings/ http://www.eia.gov/consumption/commercial/

Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016

From the Executive Director and Board Chair
New York City is Transforming Buildings for a Low Carbon Future
Does Electric Grid 2.0 Mean Energy Democracy?
Resiliency for Affordable Multifamily Housing: What We Have Learned and What We Still Need to Know
Break It or Lose It: Thermal Bridging in Rainscreen Systems
My PEI is Better Than Your PEI
Life Cycle Assessment at the Speed of Design
From Theory to Reality: Our Journey Toward Sustainability Building a Net Zero Home
Solar Policy in the Northeast: What’s New, What’s Next?
BuildingEnergy Green Pages
Index to Advertisers / Ad.com
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - cover1
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - cover2
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 3
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 4
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 5
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - From the Executive Director and Board Chair
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 7
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 8
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 9
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - New York City is Transforming Buildings for a Low Carbon Future
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 11
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 12
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 13
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 14
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 15
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 16
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 17
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 18
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 19
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - Does Electric Grid 2.0 Mean Energy Democracy?
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 21
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 22
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 23
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 24
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 25
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - Resiliency for Affordable Multifamily Housing: What We Have Learned and What We Still Need to Know
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 27
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 28
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 29
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 30
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 31
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 32
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 33
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - Break It or Lose It: Thermal Bridging in Rainscreen Systems
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 35
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 36
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 37
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 38
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 39
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - My PEI is Better Than Your PEI
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 41
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 42
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 43
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - Life Cycle Assessment at the Speed of Design
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 45
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 46
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 47
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - From Theory to Reality: Our Journey Toward Sustainability Building a Net Zero Home
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 49
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 50
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - Solar Policy in the Northeast: What’s New, What’s Next?
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 52
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 53
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - BuildingEnergy Green Pages
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 55
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 56
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 57
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 58
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 59
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 60
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 61
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 62
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 63
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 64
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 65
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 66
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 67
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 68
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 69
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 70
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 71
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 72
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 73
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 74
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 75
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 76
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 77
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 78
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 79
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 80
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - Index to Advertisers / Ad.com
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 82
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - cover3
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - cover4
http://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/ENEB/ENEB0118
http://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/ENEB/ENEB0217
http://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/ENEB/ENEB0117
http://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/ENEB/ENEB0216
http://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/ENEB/ENEB0116
http://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/ENEB/ENEB0215
http://www.nxtbookMEDIA.com