BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 50


THE DETAILS

* 2,853 ft², newly constructed hybrid
timberframe home
* Completed in summer 2016
* Douglas fir timber frame
* Site-harvested Black Cherry and White Oak
used for interior millwork
* Reclaimed elm wood floors and cabinetry
* 10,260 watt ground-mount solar array
consisting of 36 SolarWorld 285 mono
panels with Enphase M250 microinverters
* Projected PV production of 12,702 kWh/yr
* Air infiltration rate of 0.28 ACH50 (53
percent lower than Passive House Institute
US target)
* Inline Fiberglass triple pane windows
(U = 0.15 to 0.17)
* Mitsubishi multi-zone ducted and ductless
air-source heat pump
* Zehnder ComfoAir 350 energy recovery
ventilator (ERV)
* Subslab - 4-inch Expanded Polystyrene
Insulation (EPS) (R-16), Foundation walls -
2-inch EPS and 4-inch Roxul (R-24 total)
* Pre-panelized 12-inch double-stud walls,
24-inch on center, with a continuous layer
of INTELLO Plus variable vapor membrane
on outside surface of inside wall, densepacked cellulose (R-40)
* Pre-panelized 18-inch I-beam roof, densepacked cellulose (R-60)
* Euroshield EuroLite® Slate rubber roofing
(up to 95 percent recycled content from
tires)
* eGauge energy meter system
* Whirlpool Heat Pump dryer
* GE GeoSpring™ Heat Pump Water Heater
* Haiku H Series Ceiling Fan
* SportsArt exercise elliptical with a microinverter to put electricity back into the grid

To help minimize our carbon footprint we
were mindful about our material selection.
Services, Inc., both experts in Passive
House consulting, to collaborate on
the implementation details for the
envelope design. Throughout the
design process, I utilized and updated
Marc's Zero Net Energy Model
calculator to better understand the
energy impacts of any design changes
we made.
DESIGN CONCEPT SKETCH
One of the concerns with
double wall construction is the risk
of condensation building up and
increasing the moisture content on
the inside of the exterior sheathing.
To address this concern, the Airtight
Services team recommended that
we modify the design to include a
continuous vapor retarder membrane
called INTELLO Plus on the outside
surface of the inside wall.
I supplemented my learnings
from Marc's course with HERS rater
training at Performance Systems
Development (PSD) in Ithaca, New
York. Using new skills gained from
this training, I did a blower door
test for our home. After installing
windows and cellulose insulation and
air sealing our home, we achieved an
infiltration rate of 0.28 ACH50, which
is 53 percent lower than the Passive
House Institute US target. Needless
to say, this rating impressed our
Passive House friends from Airtight
Services.
To help minimize our carbon
footprint we were mindful about
our material selection. We used LED

lighting throughout the house, rubber
roofing made from recycled tires, and
harvested black cherry and white oak
from our site for various counters,
cabinets and benches in our house. We
also used reclaimed wood purchased
from Pioneer Millworks, NEW's sister
company, for other millwork including
beautiful elm flooring, single-track,
mixed hardwood "barn" doors and an
accent wall. We tried to select lowmaintenance materials to facilitate
aging in place in our home.
We hope that our project inspires
others to see the possibility of
building their own net zero energy
home or that it at least provides
others with ideas for how to be more
energy efficient and sustainable. I
know that the skills I learned from
Marc's course, coupled with our
passion to build a house with a soul,
has allowed us to walk the talk and
build our dream - our CreekSide Net
Zero home.
ABOUT THE AUTHOR
Tom Lambert retired from Xerox
in 2013 after 32 years in numerous
roles, ultimately serving as manager
of the worldwide launch organization
and responsible for the introduction
and delivery of new products. He
has reinvented himself as owner of
CreekSide Energy Solutions, a company
he started to provide residential energy
modeling and consulting services. Tom
is a certified HERS rater and Energy Star
Builder and currently consults with NEW
MEMBER
as a program manager.

Commercial & Residential Installers
for Southeastern MA, Cape Cod & The Islands

Photovoltaic Solar Installations
New England weather can be rough but with
RST Thermal, there is no beƩer place to be!
VISIT OUR WEB-SITE: WWW.RSTTHERMAL.COM
372 University Ave, Westwood, MA 02090
(P) 781-320-9910 (F) 781-320-9906

50 * BUILDINGENERGY
780383_RST.indd
1

VOL. 35 NO. 2 | FALL 2016 19/11/15

10#PY$PUVJU
."ttXXXDPUVJUTPMBSDPN

11:31
pm
762197_Cotuit.indd
1

14/08/15 11:11 pm


http://www.cotuitsolar.com http://www.RSTThermal.com http://WWW.RSTTHERMAL.COM

Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016

From the Executive Director and Board Chair
New York City is Transforming Buildings for a Low Carbon Future
Does Electric Grid 2.0 Mean Energy Democracy?
Resiliency for Affordable Multifamily Housing: What We Have Learned and What We Still Need to Know
Break It or Lose It: Thermal Bridging in Rainscreen Systems
My PEI is Better Than Your PEI
Life Cycle Assessment at the Speed of Design
From Theory to Reality: Our Journey Toward Sustainability Building a Net Zero Home
Solar Policy in the Northeast: What’s New, What’s Next?
BuildingEnergy Green Pages
Index to Advertisers / Ad.com
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - cover1
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - cover2
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 3
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 4
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 5
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - From the Executive Director and Board Chair
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 7
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 8
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 9
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - New York City is Transforming Buildings for a Low Carbon Future
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 11
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 12
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 13
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 14
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 15
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 16
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 17
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 18
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 19
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - Does Electric Grid 2.0 Mean Energy Democracy?
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 21
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 22
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 23
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 24
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 25
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - Resiliency for Affordable Multifamily Housing: What We Have Learned and What We Still Need to Know
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 27
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 28
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 29
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 30
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 31
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 32
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 33
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - Break It or Lose It: Thermal Bridging in Rainscreen Systems
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 35
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 36
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 37
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 38
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 39
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - My PEI is Better Than Your PEI
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 41
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 42
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 43
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - Life Cycle Assessment at the Speed of Design
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 45
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 46
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 47
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - From Theory to Reality: Our Journey Toward Sustainability Building a Net Zero Home
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 49
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 50
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - Solar Policy in the Northeast: What’s New, What’s Next?
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 52
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 53
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - BuildingEnergy Green Pages
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 55
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 56
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 57
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 58
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 59
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 60
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 61
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 62
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 63
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 64
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 65
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 66
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 67
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 68
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 69
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 70
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 71
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 72
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 73
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 74
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 75
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 76
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 77
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 78
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 79
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 80
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - Index to Advertisers / Ad.com
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 82
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - cover3
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - cover4
http://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/ENEB/ENEB0118
http://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/ENEB/ENEB0217
http://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/ENEB/ENEB0117
http://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/ENEB/ENEB0216
http://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/ENEB/ENEB0116
http://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/ENEB/ENEB0215
http://www.nxtbookMEDIA.com