BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 51


POLICY: SOLAR OUTLOOK

SOLAR POLICY IN THE NORTHEAST:
WHAT'S NEW, WHAT'S NEXT?
BY KARL R. RÁBAGO
AND MIKE TRAHAN

T

he Northeast Solar Energy Market
Coalition (NESEMC or the Coalition)
was established in December 2014
with support from the United States
Department of Energy (US DOE)
SunShot Initiative's Solar Market Pathways
program. NESEMC works to advance solar
market development and solar deployment in
the Northeast by advancing solar market policy
through the efforts of a coalition of solar business
associations in the region.
The Coalition is managed through the Pace
Energy and Climate Center. Its membership
includes Solar Connecticut, the Mid-Atlantic
Solar Energy Industries Association (MSEIA),
the Solar Energy Business Association of New
England (SEBANE) and the New York Solar
Energy Industries Association (NYSEIA). NESEMC
has decided to focus its policy efforts on four
key issues: green banking, interconnection,
permitting, and value of solar. The coalition
aims to break down silos and share information,
embracing the core premise that no one state
solar industry in the Northeast can survive unless
we do better as a region.
SOLAR POLICY ISSUES FOR THE NORTHEAST
GREEN BANKING: NESEMC is working with
top researchers and advocates of green banks in
the U.S. to gather the data necessary to prove
the need for additional state-level green banks
in the Northeast. State-funded green banks are
expanding the solar market in many markets across
the country.
To substantiate the benefit of forming
additional state green banks in the Northeast,
NESEMC is working closely with the Coalition
for Green Capital and the Union of Concerned
Scientists (UCS). The Connecticut Green Bank was
brought on a NESEMC partner. Discussions are
ongoing with UCS on whether a model UCS used to
prove green bank viability in several states can be
run in Northeast states where ratepayer-funded
incentives are being challenged, are in decline or are
non-existent.
VALUE OF SOLAR: In the Northeast, only Maine
solar advocates have been successful in setting a
Value of Solar (VOS) through a state-sanctioned
process. In Maine, VOS has been revealed to
be as high as $0.33/kWh, when all known and
measurable costs and benefits are counted.
SEBANE Coalition members in Massachusetts and
other states are pushing for VOS analysis. In New

York, the "Value of Distributed Energy Resources"
process is addressing VOS in the context of the larger
"Reforming the Energy Vision" process laid out by
Governor Andrew M. Cuomo, offering promise of
additional momentum for full and fair solar valuation.
The Rhode Island Public Utilities Commission has
launched Docket 4600, an inquiry in the utility-ofthe-future issues, and which calls for a cost-benefit
analysis to help guide review of utility rate structure
in future proceedings.
Value seems to be the significant solar market
policy issue for NESEMC states, where net metering
caps are common. For this reason, Coalition staff
have prepared and shared a series of documents
specifically for Coalition members' use in helping to
educate decision makers in their states on the VOS
issue. The pieces, available at the NESEMC website,
www.nesemc.com, include:
* Achieving very high PV penetration: The need for
an effective electricity remuneration framework
and a central role for grid operators
* How to Assess the True Value of Solar
* Value of Solar Study Design Elements
* Value of Solar Tariff Pilot Design Elements
* Presentation - Understanding the Value of
Renewable Energy
NESEMC's role is to build a clean energy,
environmental and economic development case for
why states should consider VOS analysis. One recent
case study demonstrates the "value" of VOS analysis.
In early 2016, the Connecticut General Assembly's
nonpartisan Office of Fiscal Analysis (OFA) analyzed
a community solar bill and determined the bill would
create costs for the state. A Connecticut legislator
arranged a meeting of Coalition co-directors with the
OFA who wrote the bill analysis. Once the Coalition
introduced the benefits addressed in VOS analysis,
the OFA staffer amended the analysis, effectively
neutralizing the adverse tone of the fiscal note. The
community solar bill was later signed into law.
INTERCONNECTION: The interconnection
process-which involves technical and engineering
procedures associated with connecting solar
generators to the grid-has slowed the growth of
solar in the Northeast, and is therefore a soft cost
worth targeting.
NESEMC plans to advise solar leaders on how to
create their own interconnection working group, and
has started the process in Connecticut. The longterm goal is to develop a regional interconnection
working group that would facilitate the sharing of
harmonious interconnection best practices
between states.
NESEA.ORG * 51


http://www.nesemc.com http://www.NESEA.ORG

Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016

From the Executive Director and Board Chair
New York City is Transforming Buildings for a Low Carbon Future
Does Electric Grid 2.0 Mean Energy Democracy?
Resiliency for Affordable Multifamily Housing: What We Have Learned and What We Still Need to Know
Break It or Lose It: Thermal Bridging in Rainscreen Systems
My PEI is Better Than Your PEI
Life Cycle Assessment at the Speed of Design
From Theory to Reality: Our Journey Toward Sustainability Building a Net Zero Home
Solar Policy in the Northeast: What’s New, What’s Next?
BuildingEnergy Green Pages
Index to Advertisers / Ad.com
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - cover1
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - cover2
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 3
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 4
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 5
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - From the Executive Director and Board Chair
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 7
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 8
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 9
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - New York City is Transforming Buildings for a Low Carbon Future
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 11
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 12
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 13
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 14
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 15
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 16
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 17
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 18
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 19
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - Does Electric Grid 2.0 Mean Energy Democracy?
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 21
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 22
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 23
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 24
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 25
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - Resiliency for Affordable Multifamily Housing: What We Have Learned and What We Still Need to Know
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 27
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 28
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 29
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 30
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 31
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 32
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 33
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - Break It or Lose It: Thermal Bridging in Rainscreen Systems
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 35
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 36
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 37
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 38
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 39
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - My PEI is Better Than Your PEI
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 41
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 42
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 43
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - Life Cycle Assessment at the Speed of Design
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 45
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 46
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 47
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - From Theory to Reality: Our Journey Toward Sustainability Building a Net Zero Home
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 49
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 50
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - Solar Policy in the Northeast: What’s New, What’s Next?
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 52
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 53
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - BuildingEnergy Green Pages
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 55
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 56
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 57
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 58
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 59
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 60
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 61
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 62
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 63
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 64
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 65
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 66
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 67
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 68
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 69
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 70
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 71
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 72
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 73
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 74
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 75
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 76
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 77
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 78
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 79
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 80
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - Index to Advertisers / Ad.com
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - 82
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - cover3
BUILDING ENERGY - Fall 2016 - cover4
http://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/ENEB/ENEB0118
http://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/ENEB/ENEB0217
http://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/ENEB/ENEB0117
http://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/ENEB/ENEB0216
http://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/ENEB/ENEB0116
http://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/ENEB/ENEB0215
http://www.nxtbookMEDIA.com