Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - 18

Feature

The measurement of a
health care facility manager:

How
do you
define
success?
By Antonio Suarez, CHFM, SASHE, director of
facility services, Midland Memorial Hospital

C

areer success can mean
different things to each of
us, so how do we measure
ourselves as health care
facility managers? Is our
success achieved when we
finally get that promotion we have been
working toward or by accomplishing
some other career goal that we set for
ourselves? If two hospitals or health
care systems merge and only one
of the facility managers is assigned
oversight for both facilities and the
other manager position eliminated, has
the other manager somehow become
"unsuccessful"? I wouldn't think so!
18 INSIDE ASHE | FALL 2017

Someone just simply made a business
decision and selected the leader that
they felt was a better organizational fit.
Our personal ambitions and goals
and those of our leaders influence
how we define success. Regardless
of how you define success, I would
encourage you to refrain from
comparing yourself to other managers
or against your perception of their level
of effectiveness. Each facility possesses
a unique environment and differs in the
responsibilities the leadership assigns
to the facility managers. The roles and
responsibilities of health care facility
managers can look very different

from one hospital to another. Can one
equally compare the facility manager's
roles and responsibilities of a rural
critical access hospital to those of a
large, urban, tertiary teaching hospital?
Both managers play a vital role in the
institution, both share some common
areas of responsibilities; however, overall,
the scope of each will most likely be very
different. A single standard by which the
success of a health care facility managers
can be measured does not exist. No two
health care facilities or facility managers
are likely to function in the same manner.
So, how do facility managers
differentiate themselves? A facility
manager can best achieve measurable
personal or professional success
by continuously improving against
personal past performance and avoiding
comparisons to others. Yes, you might
track performance against others to
understand where you stand against
acceptable benchmarks in the field,
but the key to success is to proactively
pursue improvement to personal
performance and the value added
by incremental progress. A facility
manager's journey to success does not
have a singular destination at which
one arrives and declares "I am now
successful," nor is success defined by the
accomplishment of any specific goal.
A facility manager is successful when
they are able to demonstrate a history
of continuous improvement toward
their personal and organization's goals.
Success can be a process of gradual
improvement from past performance.
First, a facility manager needs
to identify personal performance
improvement opportunities. Most



Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of Inside ASHE - Fall 2017

Letter from the president
What’s new
Pop quiz
The measurement of a health care facility manager: How do you define success?
Creating a program to identify and monitor pressure dependent spaces
Critical considerations for specifying a building automation system for health care
Bright ideas: LED renovation at Boulder Community Health
Selecting the right fire extinguisher for operating rooms
Still battling reheat energy in hospitals: Short- and long-term ideas for hospitals’ biggest energy use
The financial impact of variable speed ventilation controls in hospital kitchens
Data driven culture fuels University of Florida Health’s success in energy and operational optimization
Energy management in a critical access hospital: How Barnesville Hospital reduced energy consumption by 39 percent
Value analysis: Improving operating margin through cost savings
Member spotlight
Advertisers’ index
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - Intro
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - bellyband1
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - bellyband2
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - cover1
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - cover2
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - 3
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - 4
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - 5
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - 6
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - 7
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - 8
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - Letter from the president
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - What’s new
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - 11
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - Pop quiz
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - 13
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - 14
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - 15
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - 16
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - 17
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - The measurement of a health care facility manager: How do you define success?
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - 19
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - Creating a program to identify and monitor pressure dependent spaces
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - 21
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - 22
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - 23
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - Critical considerations for specifying a building automation system for health care
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - 25
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - 26
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - 27
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - Bright ideas: LED renovation at Boulder Community Health
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - 29
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - 30
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - 31
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - 32
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - 33
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - Selecting the right fire extinguisher for operating rooms
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - 35
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - 36
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - 37
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - 38
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - 39
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - 40
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - 41
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - Still battling reheat energy in hospitals: Short- and long-term ideas for hospitals’ biggest energy use
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - 43
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - 44
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - 45
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - The financial impact of variable speed ventilation controls in hospital kitchens
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - 47
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - 48
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - 49
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - 50
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - 51
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - Data driven culture fuels University of Florida Health’s success in energy and operational optimization
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - 53
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - 54
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - 55
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - Energy management in a critical access hospital: How Barnesville Hospital reduced energy consumption by 39 percent
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - 57
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - Value analysis: Improving operating margin through cost savings
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - 59
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - Member spotlight
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - Advertisers’ index
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - 62
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - cover3
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - cover4
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - outsert1
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - outsert2
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - 70
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - 71
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - 72
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - 73
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - 74
Inside ASHE - Fall 2017 - 75
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