The Western Journal 2013 - (Page 30)

BALANCING INDUSTRY GROWTH WITH ENVIRONMENTAL CONCERNS By Stephen Murdoch T ucked away in northern British Columbia, the quiet unassuming Town of Kitimat and its 8,000 inhabitants have been thrust into the national media spotlight. From coast to coast, there has been great discussion around the proposed Northern Gateway Pipeline. The $5 billion investment, which will see two pipelines running from Bruderheim, Alberta to Kitimat, British Columbia, has also led to dialogue on how to best balance jobs and industry growth with environmental protection. As Executive Vice President of the Mechanical Contractors Association of British Columbia, Dana Taylor is well aware of the challenge of balancing growth with sustainability. “Personally, I believe there are opportunities for the industry to grow, while still being mindful of the environment we work in. Working within the environmental parameters set out by the government, we can grow the industry and with it, jobs, too. Our industry plays a large role in the province’s economy and quality of life. Ongoing dialogue with industry, government and other interested parties will go a long way to addressing the need for growth, while being attentive to the environment,” Taylor explained. For those organizations that are undertaking pipeline projects in northern British Columbia, Taylor recommends tapping into the knowledge 30 of those that work in the industry. “Whether expanding pipeline or building new, every effort should be made to consult service providers on an ongoing basis. Establishing clear communications channels with suppliers early on will reduce risk during installation. Also, it is equally important to secure the support of the majority when undertaking projects of such magnitude,” Taylor said. When it comes to projects like the Northern Gateway Pipeline, Taylor, a 23-year association veteran, believes development is possible with little impact to the environment. “If suppliers and the client work together to establish a set of clear objectives that account for the environment, anything is possible. Being aware of the environmental rules and regulations and taking a leadership role throughout the project will serve contractors well. We often forget the designers and installers that work in the industry have knowledge that is second to none. Working with industry partners from conception to completion will go a long way to keeping our environment safe,” Taylor went on to say. A massive vertical and horizontal integration of coordination across government, the industry and the communities in northern British Columbia will provide opportunities for economic growth. “It is possible to do good business, while doing green business,” said Taylor. “It is only when parties come together that we can discuss and implement best environmental practices as they relate to construction. Prior to breaking ground for pipeline projects, it is important to create a set of key environmental metrics and educate parties on sustainability issues. With each pipeline construction our industry takes on, new challenges and opportunities as they relate to the environment will be met head on.” When it comes to the construction of pipelines in northern British Columbia, the people who are often forgotten are the people that call the land their home. “Owners of the pipelines and contractors need to be mindful of the people in the communities. There are several towns scattered across the northern part of the province and many people that live and work in those respective towns. As an industry, we have to be respectful of the inhabitants and involve them, when possible, in the decision making process,” Taylor said. With several proposed pipeline projects on the horizon, Taylor believes the industry is in an enviable position. “We have an opportunity to blaze a path for future generations,” he said. “Yes, the economy needs to grow to support our population. However, this growth can be achieved in a sustainable manner. Inefficiencies in programming, poor maintenance and obsolete technologies can have a huge environmental impact. Mechanical Contractors Associations of Alberta, B.C., Manitoba & Saskatchewan 2013 http://www.naylornetwork.com/mab-nxt

Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of The Western Journal 2013

MCA Canada
Alberta
British Columbia
Manitoba
Saskatchewan
Alberta
British Columbia
Manitoba
Saskatchewan
Inspiring Innovation with Current and Future Students
Balancing Industry Growth with Environmental Concerns
An Even Greener British Columbia
Saskatchewan Immigration and the Mechanical Contracting Industry
MSCC : Discover Your Service-Specific Association
Helping To Shape the Talent of Tomorrow
A Living Breathing Building: VIDOInterVac
Index to Advertisers

The Western Journal 2013

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