The Western Journal 2013 - (Page 46)

South façade of International Vaccine Centre, Saskatoon, SK., Canada’s newest Level 3 biocontainment facility A Living Breathing Building: VIDO-InterVac By Jeffrey Reed T he mechanical contracting element of any modern structure leaves no room for error. When you’re designing a modern $140-million research station including virology, immunology, bacteriology and biochemistry labs, zero tolerance for security leeks takes even greater precedence. The University of Saskatchewan’s International Vaccine Centre (InterVac) – home of the Vaccine and Infectious Disease Organization (VIDO) – is a world-class research institution sprawling over 160 acres, and operating with an annual budget of $12 million. VIDO-InterVac’s Vision Statement – “Protecting the world from infectious diseases” – speaks volumes about its demand for a flawless mechanical contracting inclusion. Its mandate of developing vaccines and technologies against infectious diseases has few equals. Created in 1975 to develop vaccines against economicallydevastating diseases of livestock, and to ensure the technology reached livestock producers, VICD-InterVac is now one of the largest Containment Level 3 (CL3) vaccine research and development facilities in North America. Boasting more than 150 staff (including researchers from more than 20 countries) working in 100,000 square feet of laboratory and administrative space, the centre helps protect animals and humans from emerging and existing infectious diseases by developing new vaccines and improving existing ones; creating new and better methods of administering vaccines in both humans and animals; enabling researchers to respond quickly to new diseases yet to emerge, and potentially contribute to diagnostic efforts; and improving the safety of food and water. Prime Minister Stephen Harper attended the September 2011 grand opening of this world-leading research facility – one-of-a-kind in its purpose, and also unique in its design. In November 2011, AODBT Architecture + Interior Design captured a Saskatchewan Premier’s Award of Excellence for Architecture for its part in designing the VIDO-InterVac centre. With a focus on vaccines against emerging and existing 46 diseases and pathogens, including avian influenza H5N1, West Nile virus, tuberculosis, BSE, CWD, zoonotic diseases including E. coli and Johne’s disease, as well as food-borne illnesses, the centre holds more than 80 awarded U.S. patents. “This facility was conceived and saw construction start before SARS, before avian influenza, before the [2001] movie, Contagion, and before Level 3 and Level 4 diseases started to hit the news aggressively,” explains Dr. Paul Hodgson, VIDO-InterVac associate director of business development. Canada’s only Level 4 centre is a federal government centre in Winnipeg, Manitoba. “With any facility like [VIDO-InterVac], the primary concern is safety – safety of the community, and safety of the scientists and workers in the facility,” explains Hodgson. “That is the only reason for this building – to ensure the safety of people around it and in it, while we are making progress on those deadly diseases.” A non-profit research centre, owned by the University of Saskatchewan, VIDO-InterVac operates with support from the governments of Saskatchewan and Alberta, the Government of Canada, foundations and industry competitive grants. Income is also generated from service contracts and licensing revenue. Even from its inception, VIDO-InterVac was “not a simple building,” says Cam Ewart, the centre’s associate director operations and maintenance. “We hosted numerous lunch-andlearn sessions with potential contractors to help make them knowledgeable about what they were getting into at the bid process, to make sure they knew this was a long-term, multiyear commitment. It took us five years to build this facility and get it commissioned. And there were certain assemblies that [contractors] wouldn’t come across during typical construction.” Eventually enlisting Black & McDonald as mechanical contractor with this intricate, demanding project, VIDO-InterVac held classroom sessions to instruct contractors on expectations of “level of performance, level of inspection, and what to expect during the review process of final assemblies,” explains Ewart. Mechanical Contractors Associations of Alberta, B.C., Manitoba & Saskatchewan 2013 http://www.naylornetwork.com/mab-nxt

Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of The Western Journal 2013

MCA Canada
Alberta
British Columbia
Manitoba
Saskatchewan
Alberta
British Columbia
Manitoba
Saskatchewan
Inspiring Innovation with Current and Future Students
Balancing Industry Growth with Environmental Concerns
An Even Greener British Columbia
Saskatchewan Immigration and the Mechanical Contracting Industry
MSCC : Discover Your Service-Specific Association
Helping To Shape the Talent of Tomorrow
A Living Breathing Building: VIDOInterVac
Index to Advertisers

The Western Journal 2013

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