Success By Association - March/April 2017 - 24

employeemanagement

Should They Stay or Should They Go?
(With apologies to The Clash)
Lisa Ward, CAE

I

've managed quite a few people over the years and have
learned along the way to recognize warning signs that
it may be time for an employee to go. Disclaimer: these
reflections are my personal opinions and should not be
perceived as having been vetted or approved by a human
resources professional.
The Best Employees Don't Need Managing. I've had the
pleasure of supervising many star employees. The best part of
these individuals is that they don't really need managing. They
need me to help guide them in the right direction, outline
the project, and be a resource for questions, but they don't
need or want me looking over their shoulder. For these star
employees, my role is much more a coach than manager. And I
like it that way.
On the other hand, if I find that I am constantly checking up on
an employee, asking where they are on projects, and correcting
mistakes, I'm in the role of manager and there's a problem
on either my end or the employee's. I am to blame if I haven't
explained the project adequately, have been vague about due
dates or milestones, or have not made deliverables clear. At that
point, I need to remind myself that my employee is not a mind
reader and it's my responsibility to give thorough direction. If,
on the other hand, expectations and guidance have been given
but the problems recur despite coaching, it's time to think about
a performance improvement plan.
If You're Not Happy, They're Not Happy. Sometimes, an
individual is simply not a good fit for either the position or for
the culture. Whether it's a lack of a specific skillset, or just a
mismatch of personality or temperament, the kindest thing
a supervisor can do is to sit down with the employee and be
candid (and kind) about the situation. The employee knows
it's not working; they just haven't admitted it yet. I faced this
situation with an employee, and it turns out her heart was
simply not in the type of work we were doing. She left the
position to pursue her dream job and is so much happier than
when she was locked into a position that didn't suit her.
Take the Pulse of Your Team. Toxic or lazy employees impact
the entire team. You can sense the effect a toxic employee has
on co-workers during a meeting. They have a way of sapping
energy and putting the team on edge. A lazy employee is just as
damaging to morale and productivity. Hard-working employees
will quickly - and understandably - become resentful when
they see a co-worker skating by with a minimum of effort and
work. Don't delay the inevitable. If you are noticing an employee
who projects a bad attitude, so are your other team members.

24

success || march/april 2017

And they're probably wondering why you're not acting on
the problem. Don't risk losing your good team members by
tolerating bad ones. Get advice from a human resources
organization or an attorney and develop a fair, kind and legal
termination plan.
Managing employees and leading teams is a bit like parenting.
No one tells you what to do or how best to do it - you just learn
as you go. But, there are resources to help you along the way.
Check out articles on Linked In. Google effective leadership tips
- there is a ton of information out there. Talk to your colleagues
(keeping details confidential, of course.) Consider seeking the
counsel of the smart folks at CAI* if you're in a situation where
you need help. You don't have to go it alone. z
*CAI is Capital Associated Industries, which helps MAXIMIZE
employee engagement and MINIMIZE employer liability through
human resources and management advice, training, news,
survey data, public policy advocacy and consulting services.
Learn more at capital.org. See articles by Bruce Clarke, the CEO
of CAI, on pages 10 and 11.

Lisa Ward, CAE is Associate Executive
Director of the NC Dental Society and
currently serves as Secretary-Treasurer
for the AENC Board of Directors.


http://www.capital.org

Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of Success By Association - March/April 2017

President’s Message
Event Calendar
Change, One Person at a Time
What I Learned as an Employment Attorney: Non-Legal Advice to Get You Out of Legal Hot Water
Is Your Hiring Filter in the Way?
Freedom Comes From Rules
Cost/Benefit of an Organization Retreat
Polish Up Your Confict-of-Interest Policy
Legislative Reception a Success!
Getting the Leadership Basics Right
Member Updates
Should They Stay or Should They Go? (With Apologies to the Clash)
Young Leader Profile
Advertiser Index
Buyers’ Guide
Advertiser Showcase
Executive Director’s Message
Success By Association - March/April 2017 - cover1
Success By Association - March/April 2017 - cover2
Success By Association - March/April 2017 - 3
Success By Association - March/April 2017 - President’s Message
Success By Association - March/April 2017 - Event Calendar
Success By Association - March/April 2017 - 6
Success By Association - March/April 2017 - Change, One Person at a Time
Success By Association - March/April 2017 - What I Learned as an Employment Attorney: Non-Legal Advice to Get You Out of Legal Hot Water
Success By Association - March/April 2017 - 9
Success By Association - March/April 2017 - Is Your Hiring Filter in the Way?
Success By Association - March/April 2017 - Freedom Comes From Rules
Success By Association - March/April 2017 - Cost/Benefit of an Organization Retreat
Success By Association - March/April 2017 - 13
Success By Association - March/April 2017 - Polish Up Your Confict-of-Interest Policy
Success By Association - March/April 2017 - 15
Success By Association - March/April 2017 - Legislative Reception a Success!
Success By Association - March/April 2017 - 17
Success By Association - March/April 2017 - 18
Success By Association - March/April 2017 - 19
Success By Association - March/April 2017 - Getting the Leadership Basics Right
Success By Association - March/April 2017 - 21
Success By Association - March/April 2017 - Member Updates
Success By Association - March/April 2017 - 23
Success By Association - March/April 2017 - Should They Stay or Should They Go? (With Apologies to the Clash)
Success By Association - March/April 2017 - 25
Success By Association - March/April 2017 - Young Leader Profile
Success By Association - March/April 2017 - Advertiser Index
Success By Association - March/April 2017 - Buyers’ Guide
Success By Association - March/April 2017 - Advertiser Showcase
Success By Association - March/April 2017 - Executive Director’s Message
Success By Association - March/April 2017 - cover3
Success By Association - March/April 2017 - cover4
http://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/NCES/NCES0417
http://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/NCES/NCES0317
http://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/NCES/NCES0217
http://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/NCES/NCES0117
http://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/NCES/NCES0616
http://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/NCES/NCES0516
http://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/NCES/NCES0416
http://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/NCES/NCES0316
http://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/NCES/NCES0216
http://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/NCES/NCES0116
http://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/NCES/NCES0615
http://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/NCES/NCES0515
http://www.nxtbook.com/naylor/NCES/NCES0415
http://www.nxtbookMEDIA.com