Educational Procurement Journal - Summer 2018 - 23

these non-sanctioned systems do not
support global, institutional, strategic
safety directives, are not cost-effective
to an institution, and do not conform to
Best Practices.
Although card production has
been reduced from 20 minutes to 20
seconds, most campus cards still use
70-year-old antiquated technology (i.e.,
bar codes, magnetic stripes). Many
contemporary smart-chip technologies
continue to be plagued by ongoing
technological, proprietary, security and
high cost issues.
More than 500 colleges and
universities, as well as campus
dining contractors, are now using
some type of smartphone apps for
Campus Dining venues-most with
no business or customer-service
issues. Most importantly, there has
been enthusiastic acceptance of
these campus card apps by "mobile"
Millennial students.
Most students quickly upload their ID
photos, select/change meal plans, add
funds online, and correspond with the
campus card office electronically (e.g.,
email, text, Facebook®, Twitter®).
So why do most colleges and
universities continue to produce
campus cards-plastic and in-house?

New Business Model
The consolidation of diverse forms of
campus identification and elimination
of multiple department ID systems was
revolutionary and was the basis for a
very successful business model-for
the past 30 years.
Decades ago, all campus card
questions had to be answered by
employees in-person (or telephone).
Now responses to most questions
are available 24/7 via the Internet or
campus card program website.
Higher education has been
revolutionized with online college
catalogs, online registration, online
password changes, online classes and
distance learning.
However, other than standard
campus card systems upgrades, most
institutions have not formally assessed
their campus card operations,
including how to best serve their
"mobile" Millennial customers.

Major generational shifts and
technological advances have set
the stage for a paradigm shift by
administrators focused on increased
campus safety, enrollment, retention,
marketing and financial resources.
Hotels nationwide are now
replacing hotel room cards with hotel
smartphone apps which no allow
guests to bypass the front desk and
no longer require standing in a line to
be issued a plastic hotel card.
If the federal Transportation
Security Administration (TSA)
has been accepting smartphone
credentials from millions of airline
passengers safely for over 5 years,
perhaps is it time to consider
extending that convenience to your
students and employees.
We would suggest that IHE
administrators assess their
current infrastructure (i.e., policies,
technologies, material/labor costs)
and begin the migration to offering
their "mobile" Millennial students and
employees a new, virtual campus
card for access and user privileges
throughout all your facilities in a timely
and phased-in plan.
With a virtual campus card, lost
cards are no longer subject to fee
complaints, extended office hours
requests, or university expenses
(direct/indirect). Replacing a
smartphone becomes the total
responsibility of the student or
employee, regardless of time of day or
how often.
For special groups, plastic badges
can still be produced (off-site) via card
service bureaus, saving considerable
overhead, training, equipment,
inventory, card stock, and in-house
card production expenses.
Administrators need to consider a
new business model, especially in an
era of tighter budgets and increased
customer satisfaction. Straightforward
analysis should confirm that migration
from a 30-year-old, plastic-card
factory to virtual credentials and a
virtual Service Center should reduce
overall campus card office expenses
by thousands, and millions at large
universities, over a 10-year period.
Is your institution well positioned

to respond to these business
infrastructure challenges and new
campus marketing opportunities?
We recognize that there are no
cookie-cutter solutions. However,
to begin the inquiry process for
consideration of a new business model
for your institution, we have included
the following strategic questions, which
every administrator should be asking.
The Baby Boom and Millennial
generations dramatically changed
overall campus cultures. Soon,
incoming students of the Class of
2022 (Generation Z) may be deciding
whether to attend class-or just send
their drone.

Strategic Questions
Every administrator responsible,
directly or indirectly, for a Campus
Card program should be asking
the following institutional strategic
questions:
1. What if our campus card vendor
is sold?
2. Is our campus card website
contemporary and mobile-ready?
3. Why do we still need residence-hall
student-laundry readers?
4. Why do we still need to purchase
vending-machine readers?
5. Is proprietary vendor hardware (still)
a wise investment?
6. Should we leapfrog over
Contactless to mobile technology?
7. Why are we (still) making campus
cards in-house?
8. When will we make plastic campus
cards optional?
9. Why are we issuing plastic cards vs.
virtual credentials?
10. What is our plan to convert all
campus readers to mobile-ready?

Robert C. Huber, CMC, CPCM, is
a certified Campus Card Business
Consultant, vendor-independent,
campus-card pioneer, author,
business-conference speaker, and
publisher of the Campus Card
Industry Business Forecast.
Email: huber@allcampuscard.com.

EDUCATIONAL PROCUREMENT JOURNAL | www.naepnet.org

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Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of Educational Procurement Journal - Summer 2018

Professional Development Notes
NAEP President Nichol Luoma
Research and Development RFP: Procurement Assists with Innovation
Training, Testing, and Incentives
Annual Meeting Wrap-Up
Certification: Which One Are You?
Evolution or Revolution? Campus Cards: Time for a New Business Model
Book Review: Building a Fund of Sustainability Knowledge, One Book at a Time—Part Nine
Best and Final: Procurement: How the Torch Gets Passed
Index to Advertisers
Educational Procurement Journal - Summer 2018 - intro
Educational Procurement Journal - Summer 2018 - cover1
Educational Procurement Journal - Summer 2018 - cover2
Educational Procurement Journal - Summer 2018 - 3
Educational Procurement Journal - Summer 2018 - 4
Educational Procurement Journal - Summer 2018 - 5
Educational Procurement Journal - Summer 2018 - Professional Development Notes
Educational Procurement Journal - Summer 2018 - 7
Educational Procurement Journal - Summer 2018 - NAEP President Nichol Luoma
Educational Procurement Journal - Summer 2018 - 9
Educational Procurement Journal - Summer 2018 - Research and Development RFP: Procurement Assists with Innovation
Educational Procurement Journal - Summer 2018 - 11
Educational Procurement Journal - Summer 2018 - 12
Educational Procurement Journal - Summer 2018 - 13
Educational Procurement Journal - Summer 2018 - 14
Educational Procurement Journal - Summer 2018 - 15
Educational Procurement Journal - Summer 2018 - Training, Testing, and Incentives
Educational Procurement Journal - Summer 2018 - 17
Educational Procurement Journal - Summer 2018 - Annual Meeting Wrap-Up
Educational Procurement Journal - Summer 2018 - 19
Educational Procurement Journal - Summer 2018 - Certification: Which One Are You?
Educational Procurement Journal - Summer 2018 - 21
Educational Procurement Journal - Summer 2018 - Evolution or Revolution? Campus Cards: Time for a New Business Model
Educational Procurement Journal - Summer 2018 - 23
Educational Procurement Journal - Summer 2018 - 24
Educational Procurement Journal - Summer 2018 - Book Review: Building a Fund of Sustainability Knowledge, One Book at a Time—Part Nine
Educational Procurement Journal - Summer 2018 - 26
Educational Procurement Journal - Summer 2018 - 27
Educational Procurement Journal - Summer 2018 - Best and Final: Procurement: How the Torch Gets Passed
Educational Procurement Journal - Summer 2018 - 29
Educational Procurement Journal - Summer 2018 - Index to Advertisers
Educational Procurement Journal - Summer 2018 - cover3
Educational Procurement Journal - Summer 2018 - cover4
Educational Procurement Journal - Summer 2018 - outsert1
Educational Procurement Journal - Summer 2018 - outsert2
Educational Procurement Journal - Summer 2018 - outsert3
Educational Procurement Journal - Summer 2018 - outsert4
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