PestWorld - November/December 2016 - 26

❱❱ ASK THE EXPERT BY MICHAEL BENTLEY, PH.D. Q: I was told that some residual pest control products could cause ants to bud. What is budding, and why does it occur in ants? A: Budding is one form of colony reproduction exhibited by ants whereby a small number of workers depart from the main nest with one or more reproductives to establish a new nest. Not all species of ants are capable of budding. This behavior is most often seen in polygynous (multiple queens) and polydomous (multiple nests) tramp ant species, such as the Pharaoh ant Monomorium pharaonis, that do not invest a great deal in nest construction. For those that can, there are few reasons why budding may occur. Ant colonies may bud to escape predators, to avoid overcrowding, or in response to a disturbance such flooding or extreme temperatures. Similarly, the application of a repellent insecticide could act as a disturbance to some ants, worsening the infestation by causing the colony to fracture and bud. This is why it is often recommended to use non-repellent products in combination with baits when managing ants. Although, different ant species may require different application strategies to eliminate the colony, always make sure you have identified the target pest to determine the best course of treatment, and that all products are used in accordance the manufacturer's label. '' This is why it is often recommended to use non-repellant products in combination with baits when managing ants." 26 | PESTWORLD > NOVEMBER | DECEMBER 2016 Q: My client emailed me photos of what appear to be insect bites on their legs. They believe the bites are from bed bugs, but I am not sure exactly what caused the bites. How should I proceed? A: Anytime that I am presented with photos of possible insect bites, I always recommend that the client consult a medical physician. As pest control professionals, we do not possess the equipment or the medical training to properly diagnose someone's skin condition. Additionally, reactions to insect bites can differ dramatically from person to person, making it nearly impossible to identify a pest from a possible insect bite. Having said that, any evidence to suggest that biting insects could be present in a home should be taken seriously and warrants a thorough inspection. The goal is to identify both the location of the infestation and where the pest may have originated. This often involves more than just a walkthrough of the home. Obtaining information from the client about travel history and daily habits can also be crucial to determining the potential source. For example, if the client recently returned from a work trip or vacation, then luggage should be inspected for bed bugs. The same goes for any other items that are regularly carried out of the home, such as handbags, backpacks or gym bags. If no evidence of bed bugs were found during a visual inspection, then the client could have encountered bed bugs at a regularly visited location, such as a spa or bus stop. Temporarily avoiding each location for a short period could help to determine if any one site was a possible source of the bites. Q: I collected a few adult beetles from a commercial food-handling facility that looks similar to the khapra beetle. I know the khapra beetle is a serious grain pest, but I am not able to make a positive identification of the specimens. What should I do? A: If you ever collect specimens that you are not able to identify, there are several identification options available to you. First, specimens can be mailed into the National Pest Management Association headquarters at 10460 North Street, Fairfax, VA 22030, along with a description of where the specimens were collected and any other information that could be useful in identification. If you need a faster response, your local extension office is another valuable resource that can often provide species-level identification of specimens. However, when you encounter an insect that you believe to be an important invasive pest, such as the khapra beetle, then you should contact the United States Department of Agriculture's Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (USDA-APHIS). The khapra beetle is considered one of the world's most destructive pests of grain products. For this reason, the USDA takes the detection and elimination of this pest very seriously. To ensure that the khapra beetle does not establish in the United States, the USDA has developed an emergency pest response program designed to detect, contain and eradicate an infestation of this beetle. Therefore, if you believe the specimens you collected could be the khapra beetle, then you should contact the USDA to determine how you should proceed. ● Dr. Michael Bentley is NPMA's staff entomologist. He can be reached at mbentley@pestworld.org.

Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of PestWorld - November/December 2016

President’s Message
View From the Summit
No Crystal Ball Needed
The Marketing Plan Revisited
Heard From the Hill: Reasonable Overtime Legislation Introduced to Phase-in Threshold Increase
Marketing Corner: Year in Review: Top Trends in Pest Management Marketing
Ask the Expert
Membership Programs: Networking: Put Yourself in the Right Room
Hiring Drivers
Calendar of Events
Index to Advertisers
PestWorld - November/December 2016 - cover1
PestWorld - November/December 2016 - cover2
PestWorld - November/December 2016 - 3
PestWorld - November/December 2016 - 4
PestWorld - November/December 2016 - 5
PestWorld - November/December 2016 - 6
PestWorld - November/December 2016 - 7
PestWorld - November/December 2016 - President’s Message
PestWorld - November/December 2016 - 9
PestWorld - November/December 2016 - View From the Summit
PestWorld - November/December 2016 - 11
PestWorld - November/December 2016 - 12
PestWorld - November/December 2016 - 13
PestWorld - November/December 2016 - No Crystal Ball Needed
PestWorld - November/December 2016 - 15
PestWorld - November/December 2016 - 16
PestWorld - November/December 2016 - 17
PestWorld - November/December 2016 - The Marketing Plan Revisited
PestWorld - November/December 2016 - 19
PestWorld - November/December 2016 - 20
PestWorld - November/December 2016 - 21
PestWorld - November/December 2016 - Heard From the Hill: Reasonable Overtime Legislation Introduced to Phase-in Threshold Increase
PestWorld - November/December 2016 - 23
PestWorld - November/December 2016 - Marketing Corner: Year in Review: Top Trends in Pest Management Marketing
PestWorld - November/December 2016 - 25
PestWorld - November/December 2016 - Ask the Expert
PestWorld - November/December 2016 - 27
PestWorld - November/December 2016 - Membership Programs: Networking: Put Yourself in the Right Room
PestWorld - November/December 2016 - 29
PestWorld - November/December 2016 - Hiring Drivers
PestWorld - November/December 2016 - 31
PestWorld - November/December 2016 - 32
PestWorld - November/December 2016 - Calendar of Events
PestWorld - November/December 2016 - Index to Advertisers
PestWorld - November/December 2016 - cover3
PestWorld - November/December 2016 - cover4
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