Premium on Safety - Issue 29, 2018 - 1

PREMIUM ON SAFETY
ISSUE 29 SUMMER 2018

IN THIS ISSUE

Quiz: A Short Primer on Thunderstorms 05
Lessons Learned: 06
See the Fuel
Safety Spotlight: 09
Loss of Separation
ASI message: Just Culture, Safe Skies 11
Safety Counts: 12
USAIG's Performance Vector Program offers ASAP

A MESSAGE FROM USAIG
I attend a lot of aviation safety events as a part of my
position here at USAIG. It's always a pleasure to catch up
with friends at those affairs, but sometimes I find myself
wondering if perhaps too many of those faces are familiar.
The industry's safety posture would be enriched if more
organizations, and a more diverse group of aviators
participated. About 45% of respondents in a recent
National Business Aviation Association (NBAA) survey said
their flight organization does not participate in regional
aviation groups. The most cited reasons for the nonparticipation? Lack of time to attend, or a belief there are
no relevant groups in the area.
If your flight department is in the 45% that do not
participate in aviation safety events such as safety standdowns, seminars, gatherings or education sessions,
consider boosting your search for groups with which to
engage, and make some time to get involved. There are
regional (and national) aviation associations, airport and
Air Traffic Control (airspace) advisory groups, operator
roundtables and more. Exemplary flight departments tend
to place people in not one, but many of these organizations,
even paying employee membership dues; not because
it's compulsory, but because it opens channels within
that flight department that increase safety and efficiency.
Participation means employees hear new information
and safety data sooner, expand their network of industry
contacts in ways that enhance their jobs, see issues in a
broader context than just their own company views, and
take a direct role in influencing changes and solutions to
problems from within the company.
As you ponder your next strategic steps to enhance your
safety program, don't miss this one: get out there and
mingle! Fly smart and fly safe.

Paul Ratté
Director of Aviation Safety Programs, USAIG

BEST PRACTICES

Data Sharing for Flight Departments
Friend or Foe?
BY PAUL A. LANGE

Air carriers have long participated
in safety-based voluntary data
sharing and disclosure programs.
The FAA first initiated such
programs in the 1990s. Examples
include the Aviation Safety Action
Program (ASAP), Flight Operational
Quality Assurance (FOQA), and
Safety Management Systems
(SMS). Some of these programs
even incorporate the older, but still

issues so that the information can
be disseminated to others and
prevent similar occurrences.
The programs above have been
successful over time, as evidenced
by the fact that they have for all
practical purposes become a
standard for air carriers. There
is no dispute that safety has
benefited from data sharing, and

There is no dispute that safety has benefited from
data sharing, and both accident and incident rates
have steadily declined over time as a result. The
programs have not been without their growing
pains, though.
in use, Aviation Safety Reporting
System (ASRS)-often referred to
as the "NASA report." The NASA
report is primarily designed as a
simple mechanism for individuals
to enhance safety by allowing them
a deidentified and non-punitive
way (from an FAA enforcement
perspective) to self-disclose safety

both accident and incident rates
have steadily declined over time
as a result. The programs have not
been without their growing pains,
though. They were initially slow to
take hold because of participants'
concerns that sharing data about
mistakes and close calls could lead
to harmful FAA enforcement activity.
(continued on page 2)



Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of Premium on Safety - Issue 29, 2018

http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/aopa/premiumonsafety_2019issue34
http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/aopa/premiumonsafety_2019issue33
http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/aopa/premiumonsafety_2019issue32
http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/aopa/premiumonsafety_2019issue31
http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/aopa/premiumonsafety_2018issue30
http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/aopa/premiumonsafety_2018issue29
http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/aopa/premiumonsafety_2018issue28
http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/aopa/premiumonsafety_2018issue27
http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/aopa/premiumonsafety_2017issue26
http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/aopa/premiumonsafety_2017issue25
http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/aopa/premiumonsafety_2017issue24
http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/aopa/premiumonsafety_2016issue23
http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/aopa/premiumonsafety_2016issue22
http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/aopa/premiumonsafety_2016issue21
http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/aopa/premiumonsafety_2016issue20
http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/aopa/runwaysafetyflashcard
http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/aopa/premiumonsafety_2015issue19
http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/aopa/premiumonsafety_2015issue18
http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/aopa/premiumonsafety_2015issue17
http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/aopa/premiumonsafety_2015issue16
http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/aopa/premiumonsafety_2014issue15
http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/aopa/premiumonsafety_2014issue14
http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/aopa/premiumonsafety_2014issue13
http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/aopa/premiumonsafety_2013issue12
http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/aopa/premiumonsafety_2013issue11
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