2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 53

passes. Once people are retired, they can - and
maybe even prefer - to ski midweek where
there are fewer crowds on the slopes. Additionally, ski resorts have better snowmaking
and grooming than ever, making skiing easier
and more enjoyable - even in lean snow years.
It's never easy to recognize - or admit to
one's self - that you were not the skier that you
once were. For 15 years, I was progressively
ramping up my days on the hill. By the end
of the 2008 season, I had my most prolific year
at 65 days. Suddenly on day 64 and 65, my left
ankle was very sore limiting my riding. That
summer, I stayed off my ankle with no improvement. I finally went to the podiatrist and
found out that my ankle joint was destroyed
and I would never have my maximum skills
again. It was a real "What's Next" moment.
Was the desire still there? Yes, I made
changes to continue. For me, it was taping my
ankle, wearing a brace, and using a unique expensive custom fitted orthotic. It was a lot of
trouble, but in my firm snowboarding boots, it
felt more secure than usual. Indeed snowboarding was more comfortable than walking.
So that brings us to where you are right
now. Do you have the desire, and/or the means?
If so, continue with your chosen passion. Just
because you've hit a milestone birthday doesn't
mean you have to put away your skis or your
snowboard. There are still runs and trails to
enjoy! What could be better than a long
cruiser on a bluebird day? You've met many
new friends along the way. Keep in touch
with them and enjoy their company.
If you have to change, consider making
accommodations. Go to the proper healthcare
professionals to help optimize your condition.
Having a great sports oriented Chiropractor is
a real plus. Slow down or ski the easier trails.
Consider the beauty and grace of nice and easy
"ballroom" skiing. Stay in the game as long as
you can. I know you want to retain the benefits of skiing. Just think of all you would be
missing. Tune those skis. Wax that board. Sign
up for the many trips available with your ski
club, council and the Far West Ski Association.
At some point, you may reach a terminus.
Health issues, finances, or other problems. No
matter what your circumstances are, your attitude can always stay great, just like mine.
Enjoy the memories and ask yourself "What's
Next?"
Shortly after the 2009 ski season began, Richard
Lubin was paralyzed from a non-snowboard and nontraumatic condition. Due to his condition, he has
not been able to board again, but his heart is on the
slopes with you. Enjoy them while you can! ss

Marking the Safety
Boundaries

photos pr
ovided

by Emiili
o Trampu
z

On Mt. Hood West of Timberline

embers
other m rt Club
d
n
a
z
nowspo
Trampu
Emilio untain High S nage and
o
ig
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s
e
loped
of th
a safe
ed, deve
iers for
research em to assist sk se area.
a
posted th lifts and the b
to
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r

The winner of this year's Safety Person of the Year Award, Emilio Trampuz,
a member of the Mountain High Snowsport Club in Portland, Oregon,
has significantly improved the safety of skiers and snowboarders
on Mt. Hood, Oregon, by preventing them from getting lost.
Skiers have gotten lost in the forests and canyons west of Timberline for decades. A Forest Service map from 1941 identifies both Little Zig Zag Canyon and Sand Canyon as areas
where skiers get lost. They continue to get lost to this day, partly because the fall line west of
Timberline doesn't take you back to the ski area. In all these decades, only a single sign placed
in Sand Canyon warns people to exit the canyon there and start traversing, and even this sign
is so badly deteriorated that it is almost impossible to read what it says.
Emilio has been scouting the forest for the past seven or eight years, hiking it in the summer and skiing it in the winter, identifying and marking the safety boundaries with ribbons.
However, during this past year, Emilio, working with the Forest Service, obtained permission
to set up more permanent signs marking the two safety boundaries:
1. YELLOW boundary - Last chance to return to the lifts.
2. RED boundary - Last chance to return to the town of Government Camp.
Anyone going beyond the red boundary will have to deal with several hours of slogging
though deep snow and having to cross a large stream (or small river) more than once. They
will, most likely have to spend a cold and wet night in the dark forest. Fortunately, if you just
keep going down the hill, after several hours, you will eventually get to Kiwanis Camp Road
(Road 39), which is part of the old Mt. Hood highway. This road may be partially snowed in,
but if you follow it down for another two miles, you will eventually hit highway 26.
The new safety signs will hopefully help save a lot of people from this ordeal. The signs
are the size of car license plates, colored bright yellow and bright red, with text explaining that
this marks the safety boundary, and an arrow pointing toward to the lifts and the town.
Emilio received further help from several other members of the Mountain High Snowsport Club - including Kay Kinyon, Walt Blomberg, Kurt Krueger, Bill King, Tom Rodrigues, Jon
Waldum, and Janis Allen. Together, they spent hours cutting and assembling the signs, pasting
reflective arrows on them, and posting the signs on trees.
The signs were posted under the supervision of Mark Engler, the Forest Service West
Zone Recreation Program Manager.
This is an ongoing, long-term project, requiring a serious commitment. But in the end,
it's all worth it. Some skiers and riders, seeing us posting the signs have already thanked us
for doing this, and many more will be happy to come across these signs when they are
about to get lost in the forest. ss
Far West Skier's Guide 2O17 - 2O18

53



Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of 2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide

2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - Intro
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - Cover1
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - Cover2
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 1
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 2
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 3
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 4
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 5
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 6
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 7
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 8
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 9
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 10
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 11
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 12
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 13
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 14
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 15
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 16
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 17
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 18
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 19
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 20
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 21
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 22
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 23
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 24
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 25
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 26
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 27
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 28
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 29
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 30
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 31
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 32
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 33
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 34
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 35
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 36
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 37
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 38
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 39
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 40
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 41
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 42
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 43
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 44
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 45
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 46
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 47
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 48
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 49
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 50
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 51
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 52
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 53
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 54
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 55
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 56
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 57
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 58
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 59
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 60
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 61
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 62
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 63
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 64
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 64-1
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 64-2
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 64-3
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 64-4
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 64-5
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 64-6
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 64-7
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 64-8
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 64-9
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 64-10
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 64-11
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 64-12
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 64-13
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 64-14
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 64-15
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 64-16
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 64-17
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 64-18
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 64-19
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 64-20
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 64-21
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 64-22
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 64-23
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 64-24
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 64-25
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 64-26
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 64-27
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 64-28
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 65
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 66
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 67
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 68
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 69
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 70
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 71
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 72
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 73
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 74
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 75
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 76
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 77
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 78
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 79
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 80
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - Cover3
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - Cover4
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