2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 64-12

At the same time, the country was in the
midst of an economic disaster. It was difficult
for most people to put food on their tables
much less have five extra pennies to ride the
rope tow or have the 25 cent fee for ascending
the slopes in style via a new contraption
known as a chairlift. The masses just couldn't
participate. The sport remained as an activity
that mostly the wealthy could enjoy.
Several other resorts were founded in the
late 1930s, and early 1940s, including Mountain High Resort, California and Timberline in
Oregon in 1937; Arizona Snowbowl (1938);
Sugar Bowl, California (1939); and Snowbasin, Utah and Winter Park, Colorado in
1940. Bogus Basin Mountain Recreation Area,
Idaho and Ski Cooper, Colorado opened in
1942. But, since the world was at war, most
openings and developments were put on hold,
and many that had opened in the prior years
were suspended. After the war, it took some
time to jump start the industry, but efforts

were made to do just that.
As part of the World War II effort, the
10th Light Division (Alpine) was formed in
1942 at Camp Hale (elevation 9,200') near
Leadville, Colorado, at Cooper Hill (Ski Cooper)
and other high elevation locations. Months
later, the division was redesignated as the 10th
Mountain Division. Many of the ski instructors who left Europe helped train and were
part of this combat unit. Many ski club members also volunteered since they did have ski
experience. Their training created a regiment
of soldiers that were considered some of the
best in the American Army at the time. They
were taught how to rock climb, navigate the
snow on skis, and simply survive under harsh
conditions. In late 1944, the unit was shipped
to the Apennine Mountains in northern Italy
where they saw 114 days of combat against
the enemy. This group was very instrumental
in their defeat bringing a long overdue closure
to this chapter in world history.
When the Veterans of the 10th Mountain
Division came back home, they continued
their love of the mountains and skiing. They
were very instrumental in the development
and growth of the US post war ski industry.
At least 62 ski areas throughout the country
were started by these ex-soldiers beginning almost immediately after the war ended. In addition to developing ski areas such as Aspen
(1947); Sugarbush and Whiteface (Lake
Placid), both in 1958; and Vail (1962); they
helped manage the resorts and headed ski
schools across the country. By this time, the
Arlberg Technique method of teaching had almost disappeared, being replaced by the Austrian or French techniques depending on the
ski school and who was instructing.
The war years had provided jobs not
only to members of the armed services, but on
the homefront, too. Those who were not fighting abroad worked in factories to provide the
necessary items needed in the war effort.
Many people were able to save a little money
that they were able to use to begin to actually
enjoy their lives. Many small, local ski areas
were opening, thus it was convenient to spend
a day skiing. There was also an abundant
amount of war surplus ski equipment that
became available very inexpensively. More
and more people in the middle class actually
could afford cars to get to the local resorts
which were a boon to the growth of the ski
populations in the cooler climates and higher
elevation locales. Many of these areas only
had rope tows. And, it wasn't a big expense
to use them. Taking a ski vacation became a
lot more affordable to many. And, the desire
was there. They were also able to take ski in-

64 - 12 Far West Skier's Guide 2O17 - 2O18 / Digital Edition Insert

struction to learn how to ski correctly, buy the
new ski fashions of the day and purchase
newly re-designed ski equipment.
Heavy, wooden skis had been replaced by
aluminum skis and shortly thereafter with
fiberglass skis. Lighter, metal ski poles made
the bamboo poles obsolete. Buckles replaced
laces on the typical boot. Bindings improved.
The first cableless heel-and-toe release came
to market in 1951. The technology developed
from the war years made skiing easier and
safer. A growing number of new ski areas
near population centers introduced more people to the sport. In the 1950's, 54 new ski areas
opened. The old rope tows were being replaced by T Bars, J Bars and Pomas Tows.
Chairlifts, by this time, were mass-produced
and being installed throughout the country.
Even snow became better in the 1950s as the
first generation snowmaking machines and
groomers were introduced. And, the 1952
Olympics held in Oslo, Norway was garnering
a lot of attention. Although racing for the Norwegian Ski Team, the name Stein Erikson became a household name as he was the
first male Olympic Gold Medal winner who
was not from the European Alps. He later immigrated to the US, where he became an instructor and ski school director at several
different resorts over the span of his career.
The fact that a non Alps team member was
able to medal showed that Americans could
also actually compete and win, too! Ordinary
skiers became interested in participating in ski
racing, as well as recreational skiing. There
was tremendous growth during the 1950s because the middle class was beginning to be
able to participate. However, the 1960s would
be the golden era in the growth of skiing.
The next decade opened with the 1960
Olympics in Squaw Valley, California. This
North Lake Tahoe resort originally opened in
1949 with a goal of becoming a world class
ski area. The Squaw Valley Olympics were
the first Games held in the Western United
States. Technology had advanced so that computer software could report the results almost
instantaneously. In addition, the games were
televised, so much of the country's - and
world's - population was able to watch these
exciting events in their very own living rooms.
The images showed the international community that the United States ski resorts were on
a par with their European counterparts. The
US won three Silver Medals in this competition - in women's alpine events.
Four years later at the 1964 Winter Games
held in Innsbruck, Austria, two racers were

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carried almost 200 club members on this inaugural ride, and almost 8,000 passengers traveled this route during that first winter. Innkeepers relished the idea of expanding their
businesses into the colder months. However,
many of these vacationers were more interested in the party atmosphere; and to be associated with these trendsetters than riding on
top of the snow.
Since the economy had faltered by this
time due to the Great Depression, special Civilian Conservations Corps (CCC) programs
were implemented under President Franklin
D. Roosevelt. Some of these programs opened
state lands for public usage, and crews were
sent in to cut trails through forests to ascend
and descend the mountains, mostly at ski
areas and potential ski sites in New England.
W. Averill Harriman, an avid skier on the
European continent and Chairman of the
Board of the Union Pacific Railroad, took note
of the success of the Boston and Maine ski
train. On one of his European visits, he was
introduced to Austrian Count Felix Schaffgotsch and employed him to seek out the perfect location for a ski resort in the western
United States. There was one requirement.
This location needed to be near the Union Pacific rail line. After a long and intensive search,
he summoned Mr. Harriman to Ketchum,
Idaho. In late 1936, Sun Valley opened as the
first American ski destination. The North
American ski industry advanced further with
this milestone. Ski trains brought thousands
of skiers, including well known celebrities to
this area. Many who could afford it did travel
to be part of the North American ski scene!



Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of 2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide

2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - Intro
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - Cover1
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - Cover2
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 1
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 2
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 3
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 4
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 5
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 6
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 7
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 8
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 9
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 10
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 11
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 12
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 13
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 14
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 15
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 16
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 17
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 18
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 19
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 20
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 21
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 22
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 23
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 24
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 25
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 26
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 27
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 28
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 29
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 30
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 31
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 32
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 33
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 34
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 35
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 36
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 37
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 38
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 39
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 40
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 41
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 42
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 43
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 44
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 45
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 46
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 47
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 48
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 49
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 50
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 51
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 52
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 53
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 54
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 55
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 56
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 57
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 58
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 59
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 60
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 61
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 62
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 63
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 64
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 64-1
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 64-2
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 64-3
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 64-4
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 64-5
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 64-6
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 64-7
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 64-8
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 64-9
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 64-10
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 64-11
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 64-12
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 64-13
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 64-14
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 64-15
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 64-16
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 64-17
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 64-18
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 64-19
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 64-20
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 64-21
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 64-22
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 64-23
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 64-24
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 64-25
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 64-26
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 64-27
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 64-28
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 65
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 66
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 67
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 68
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 69
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 70
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 71
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 72
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 73
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 74
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 75
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 76
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 77
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 78
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 79
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - 80
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - Cover3
2017-2018 Far West Skier's Guide - Cover4
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