i3 - May/June 2018 - 2

From the CEO

Why We Need More
Women in Technology

A year ago, the industry began to hear from
women reflecting on sexual harassment in the
workplace. Then, last October, the #MeToo movement went viral after several high-profile stories
of sexual misconduct in Hollywood.
As the #MeToo movement continues to encourage better sexual harassment training in the
workplace, it has jump-started conversations
inside companies, including ours: how can we, as
CTA, lead on behalf of the technology industry?
Let's start with CES.
CES 2018 featured 288 women speakers,
increasing our representation of women speakers
to 25 percent from 22 percent the previous year.
This increase couldn't have been possible without CES EVP
Karen Chupka and her nearly all-female team's dedication to
supporting women and minorities. But another reason we
embrace diversity is that it is the right thing to do; without
inclusiveness, the U.S. would lag in innovation. I have argued
for years that American success and creativity stems in large
part from our unique diversity. CTA makes this point in our
recently released International Innovation Scorecard, where
we rank countries' diversity.
But we can do more at CES.
CES is by far the biggest and most visible global business
event, and we realize that we have a unique obligation to
champion women and underrepresented minorities. A recent
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MAY/JUNE 2018

survey found that only eight percent of
Americans say they can name a woman tech
CEO and just four percent of those actually
can. Despite the amazing visibility of tech
companies and their huge success driving economic growth and changing the world, we
lack visible female role models.
And while a few companies - such as Intel
and Lyft - are committed to a company reflective of the demographics of the American population, most companies are dominated by men
at the executive level. If we are not attracting,
promoting and funding over half of our potential talent pool, this becomes a societal, competitive, and even a national defense issue.
HBO's hit television show, Silicon Valley,
makes this point by showcasing smart but
immature men trying to launch a startup.
And its popularity may reflect the fact that
technical gifts and rapid commercial success
may not parallel emotional intelligence, empathy and a culture of
inclusiveness. As an industry - and
The diversity
as a nation - we can and must do
panel at CES 2018
better to ensure we find, recruit
led by WICT.
and develop the best talent wherever it is.
At CTA, we have started to make changes to
ensure we are more inclusive.
We will avoid all-male panels. We will
recruit, mentor and offer more speaking
opportunities to women and minorities -
both inside and outside our organization. For
example, just this March at SXSW, CTA's
Innovation Policy Day featured a nearly perfect
gender balance with 10 women speakers and 11
men speakers. Soon, CTA will announce a code
of conduct for all of our events. We will also
issue new CES speaker guidelines and find better ways to promote our CES speakers.
But it's not just about CES.
It's about encouraging young girls and minorities to enter
STEM fields, equipping them with skills for the jobs of the
future. It's also about mentoring and providing visibility.
Perhaps most importantly, it's about not lowering standards,
but instead raising people up and being conscious of the
unconscious biases we all have.

Gary Shapiro,
President and CEO
I T I S I N N O VAT I O N



Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of i3 - May/June 2018

Contents
i3 - May/June 2018 - Cover1
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i3 - May/June 2018 - Contents
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