International Educator - January/February 2017 - 21

spect to campus internationalization and in particular, the
development of partnerships with business and industry
to widen opportunities for experiential learning and practical work experience," he says.
Martha Johnson, assistant dean for learning abroad at
the University of Minnesota, agrees that there has been
enormous growth in the number of education abroad
program models designed to develop skills, such as internships, practicums, or research.
Berquist says that there has been a move away from
traditional semester and year-long study abroad programs
where students "processed the experience progressively
in following years" to more shorter, high-impact experience where there is a need to "help students through the
processing before they enter the job market."
As Tillman puts it, "education abroad programs must be
purposefully structured in such a way as to support learning outcomes which strengthen core skills and competencies
which are known to be valued by employers in all sectors."

Employers Focus on Global Skills
Rodriguez says merely participating in education abroad is
not sufficient to achieve the desired career outcomes: "All
the research done in this area shows that for a variety of
reasons (such as employer misconceptions toward study-

our Nanjing campus performed neighborhood
and market research for a chamber of commerce; communication arts students from our
Beijing campus edited and produced videos for
an international organization; and marketing
students from the Vancouver campus taught
branding at a Bronx middle school," he says.
"They all made high-impact contributions while
adding value to their résumés. Even if their intent
is to return home, having such experiences helps
them gain an advantage and stand out among
others who may have also studied abroad."
He also helps international students understand U.S. business and employment practices:
"Aside from immigration regulations, international students face language and cultural barriers. I emphasize often that their distinct styles of
résumés , presentation, and interviewing are not
wrong, just not the American norm."
And he offers advice on how to make con-

ing abroad, students' inability to articulate the experience,
etc.), listing a study abroad program in a résumé alone does
not significantly increase a student's employability chances."
According to Berquist, "it's not the education abroad
experience per se that interests employers. It's the skills
acquired during the experience."
So what types of skills are potential
employers looking for? Mary Appleby,
associate director of student professional development at Swinburne
"Global employers
University of Technology in
expect graduates entering
Melbourne, Australia, says that
the workplace today
graduates need to be able to
to be agile learners,
demonstrate capabilities beyond
proficient
communicators,
the technical and functional skills
and to work across
aligned to their studies. "Global
cultures."
employers expect graduates entering the workplace today to be agile
learners, proficient communicators, and
to work across cultures," she says.
Ann Hubbard, director of academic assessment at AIFS
Study Abroad, says there is a significant intersection in the
skills that have been identified as necessary in the global
workforce with those that define intercultural competence.
"It's things such as self-awareness, flexibility, adaptability,

nections with potential employers and put their
best foot forward during interviews. "A piece of
advice I give is to not introduce oneself as 'Hi,
my name is ___ and I'm an international student
from ___.' In the job market, students must be
known for their skills, knowledge, and abilities,
and not for where they're from."
The University of Auckland in New Zealand is another institution that has developed
employability initiatives targeted at international
students. According to international director
Brett Berquist, they have recently launched a
universitywide strategy on work-related learning
to provide support to academic and administrative units to help students take ownership for
developing their employability profile. "We have
found that sometimes international students
prioritize their academic performance to the
detriment of building the social connections that
provide them with a kiwi profile that can be a

determining factor in gaining employment after
their studies," he explains.
New Zealand allows international students to
work in any job for one year after they graduate
and then add another two years for a position
that is related to their studies. Berquist said that
while many international students have high
grades, they don't necessarily have the social
skills that employers seek. They also lack a local
network to help find a job.
"To help students understand the need to
build their profile from their first year of study,
we have designed a program called 'employability insights' working with Career Development and Employment Services, and our alumni
relations team. We pair students with alumni
for social interaction and a visit to the alumni's
workplace to help our international students find
ideas for making those connections early in their
studies," Berquist explains.

J A N + F E B .17 INTERNATIONAL EDUCATOR

21  



Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of International Educator - January/February 2017

From the Editor
In Brief
Voices
Act Globally
Tradition and History
Health and Insurance
Education Abroad
International Enrollment
View From Out Here
In Focus
International Educator - January/February 2017 - Cover1
International Educator - January/February 2017 - Cover2
International Educator - January/February 2017 - 1
International Educator - January/February 2017 - From the Editor
International Educator - January/February 2017 - 3
International Educator - January/February 2017 - In Brief
International Educator - January/February 2017 - 5
International Educator - January/February 2017 - 6
International Educator - January/February 2017 - 7
International Educator - January/February 2017 - 8
International Educator - January/February 2017 - 9
International Educator - January/February 2017 - 10
International Educator - January/February 2017 - 11
International Educator - January/February 2017 - Voices
International Educator - January/February 2017 - 13
International Educator - January/February 2017 - 14
International Educator - January/February 2017 - 15
International Educator - January/February 2017 - Act Globally
International Educator - January/February 2017 - 17
International Educator - January/February 2017 - 18
International Educator - January/February 2017 - 19
International Educator - January/February 2017 - 20
International Educator - January/February 2017 - 21
International Educator - January/February 2017 - 22
International Educator - January/February 2017 - 23
International Educator - January/February 2017 - 24
International Educator - January/February 2017 - 25
International Educator - January/February 2017 - Tradition and History
International Educator - January/February 2017 - 27
International Educator - January/February 2017 - 28
International Educator - January/February 2017 - 29
International Educator - January/February 2017 - 30
International Educator - January/February 2017 - 31
International Educator - January/February 2017 - 32
International Educator - January/February 2017 - 33
International Educator - January/February 2017 - 34
International Educator - January/February 2017 - 35
International Educator - January/February 2017 - Health and Insurance
International Educator - January/February 2017 - 37
International Educator - January/February 2017 - 38
International Educator - January/February 2017 - 39
International Educator - January/February 2017 - 40
International Educator - January/February 2017 - 41
International Educator - January/February 2017 - Education Abroad
International Educator - January/February 2017 - 43
International Educator - January/February 2017 - 44
International Educator - January/February 2017 - 45
International Educator - January/February 2017 - 46
International Educator - January/February 2017 - 47
International Educator - January/February 2017 - International Enrollment
International Educator - January/February 2017 - 49
International Educator - January/February 2017 - 50
International Educator - January/February 2017 - 51
International Educator - January/February 2017 - 52
International Educator - January/February 2017 - 53
International Educator - January/February 2017 - View From Out Here
International Educator - January/February 2017 - 55
International Educator - January/February 2017 - In Focus
International Educator - January/February 2017 - Cover3
International Educator - January/February 2017 - Cover4
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