International Educator - January/February 2017 - 30

Fatima Sabri

other countries in Asia, as well as from the Middle East.
At Mount Holyoke, which won NAFSA's 2015 Senator
Paul Simon Award for Comprehensive Internationalization, the McCulloch Center launched an initiative in 2004
to internationalize every student's education, Paus says,
and the recruitment of international students rose. As a
result of those efforts, the percentage of international students jumped from about 12 percent
then to 27 percent today.
"Having women from 70 countries
has enormous impact on everybody's
educational experience," Paus says.
"There's a greater understanding of
shared humanity, rather than stereotyping. The impact is profound."
It's a similar situation at Agnes
Scott, which launched the SUMMIT
program in the fall of 2015, through
which it reinvented its global learning and leadership development
program. Every freshman now takes
part in a faculty-led, eight-day immersion experience in another
country. There they study such topics as economic systems in Cuba, the
environment in Croatia, and Islamic art in Morocco.
SUMMIT has helped attract more international students to the college, and they now make up about 13
percent of the student body. The school now is drawing
more students from across the country, rather than just
the South, as the college aims to "prepare effective leaders
for global society," Meyer-Lee says.

Keener Interest
in the Developing World
While women's universities in the United States generally
must compete for students, that's a contrast to the situation in places such as China and India, where students
compete for places in universities, because there are more
students interested in receiving a university education
than there are seats available, Renn explains.
Young women in many countries can apply to both
coed and women's universities, increasing their chances
for admission, Renn says. And in many countries, singlesex schools at all educational levels are far more common
than in the United States, so they have wider acceptance.
In some countries, women's colleges are the only way
young women can get an education. "There's so much
hostility to getting women educated in some places," Renn
notes.
30  

INTERNATIONAL EDUCATOR J A N + F E B .17

In 2013, for example, a bomb on a Sardar Bahadur
Khan University bus killed 14 women in Pakistan, and
gunmen then killed 11 more people while attacking a hospital that was treating the wounded.
The year before, then-15-year-old Malala Yousafzai, an
advocate for girls' education in Pakistan, was shot by the
Taliban while traveling to school. Two years later she won
the Nobel Peace Prize.
AUW graduate Fatima Sabri, a 26-year-old from Kabul, Afghanistan, credits her time at the university for
helping her develop her advocacy skills. She cofounded
the Speak Up Club at AUW, designed to help women
speak up against injustice and gender-based violence. "I
think I found myself as a leader at that time."
She graduated with a degree in Asian studies in 2014
and is now enrolled in a master's degree program at the
School for International Training in Brattleboro, Vermont,
studying sustainable development in policy advocacy,
leadership, and social change. It's quite an accomplishment for a young woman who began her education as a
refugee in Pakistan.
Sabri lived in Pakistan from age 3 to 11, and got her
early education at a coed school for Afghan immigrants.
The school closed in 2002; the family had no money to
send Sabri to private school, and the government-run
school wouldn't accept refugees.
Her family returned to Afghanistan so she wouldn't have
any gaps in her education. She graduated from high school
in 2009 and took the entrance exam for admission to Kabul
University. There were far more applicants and just a limited
number of places, and Sabri was told to wait until the following year to attend. "I cried my eyes out. I was really upset."
Then her father saw an ad for AUW, and urged her to
apply. She was just 17 years old, and was among 94 Afghan
girls who took the entrance exam. Only nine passed. She
didn't know how to use a computer and says she "spoke
bad English," but she was admitted into AUW's Access
Academy, allowing her time to improve her skills.
"The hardest parts were being away from my family
and not being able to speak the language," she recalls.
She says she was an introvert until the 2011-2012
school year, when she helped found Speak Up and then
helped organize a conference focused on combatting violence against women.
Her hope is to one day open a women's learning center
in Afghanistan, where women can learn leadership skills
and work to combat gender-based violence.
In Rwanda, a women's college was founded to help
women develop their economic potential. The Akilah Institute for Women opened its doors in Kigali, Rwanda, in



Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of International Educator - January/February 2017

From the Editor
In Brief
Voices
Act Globally
Tradition and History
Health and Insurance
Education Abroad
International Enrollment
View From Out Here
In Focus
International Educator - January/February 2017 - Cover1
International Educator - January/February 2017 - Cover2
International Educator - January/February 2017 - 1
International Educator - January/February 2017 - From the Editor
International Educator - January/February 2017 - 3
International Educator - January/February 2017 - In Brief
International Educator - January/February 2017 - 5
International Educator - January/February 2017 - 6
International Educator - January/February 2017 - 7
International Educator - January/February 2017 - 8
International Educator - January/February 2017 - 9
International Educator - January/February 2017 - 10
International Educator - January/February 2017 - 11
International Educator - January/February 2017 - Voices
International Educator - January/February 2017 - 13
International Educator - January/February 2017 - 14
International Educator - January/February 2017 - 15
International Educator - January/February 2017 - Act Globally
International Educator - January/February 2017 - 17
International Educator - January/February 2017 - 18
International Educator - January/February 2017 - 19
International Educator - January/February 2017 - 20
International Educator - January/February 2017 - 21
International Educator - January/February 2017 - 22
International Educator - January/February 2017 - 23
International Educator - January/February 2017 - 24
International Educator - January/February 2017 - 25
International Educator - January/February 2017 - Tradition and History
International Educator - January/February 2017 - 27
International Educator - January/February 2017 - 28
International Educator - January/February 2017 - 29
International Educator - January/February 2017 - 30
International Educator - January/February 2017 - 31
International Educator - January/February 2017 - 32
International Educator - January/February 2017 - 33
International Educator - January/February 2017 - 34
International Educator - January/February 2017 - 35
International Educator - January/February 2017 - Health and Insurance
International Educator - January/February 2017 - 37
International Educator - January/February 2017 - 38
International Educator - January/February 2017 - 39
International Educator - January/February 2017 - 40
International Educator - January/February 2017 - 41
International Educator - January/February 2017 - Education Abroad
International Educator - January/February 2017 - 43
International Educator - January/February 2017 - 44
International Educator - January/February 2017 - 45
International Educator - January/February 2017 - 46
International Educator - January/February 2017 - 47
International Educator - January/February 2017 - International Enrollment
International Educator - January/February 2017 - 49
International Educator - January/February 2017 - 50
International Educator - January/February 2017 - 51
International Educator - January/February 2017 - 52
International Educator - January/February 2017 - 53
International Educator - January/February 2017 - View From Out Here
International Educator - January/February 2017 - 55
International Educator - January/February 2017 - In Focus
International Educator - January/February 2017 - Cover3
International Educator - January/February 2017 - Cover4
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