International Educator - January/February 2018 - S7

Part of that shift mirrors national data compiled
by the Institute of International Education's Open
Doors reports, which have shown a steady increase in
students studying abroad. In the 2004-2005 academic year, nearly 206,000 students studied abroad. A
decade later, that number had climbed by more than
52 percent.
"I always worry about the whole world," Morris
says. "Our jobs are tricky because we have to focus on
large-scale events that happen around the world and
longer-term situations that could lead to a boiling over,
but we also deal with things that could happen anywhere, like a student going missing or getting lost, one
who didn't check in because they went out of town. As
we send more students out and we kind of diversify
where they're going, we have more to monitor."

Professionalization and Building
Capacity
Morris is the first at the University of South Carolina in
her position. She took the role two years ago and started
three weeks after the November 2015 Paris attacks, in
which shootings at a concert and in the streets killed 130
people-among them a California State University-Long
Beach undergraduate student. Jason Hope at the University of Kentucky, who also began his role two years ago, is
the first in his position at his campus as well.
They're part of a growing group of specialized
university risk managers focused on international
programs, reflecting universities' acknowledgment of
an emerging need for increased capacity. The international risk position is an innovation of the last five years,
says Bill Bull, vice president for risk management at the
Council on International Educational Exchange.
"When I was hired [in 2013], I was the 23rd fulltime international study abroad health, safety, and
security officer," Bull says. "There are now over 100 of us
[in the country]."
Many of those have joined together to form a
semiprofessional organization known as Pulse: Higher
Education International Health and Safety Professionals
to share ideas, problem solve situations and, recently,
provide space for professional development. The group
initially emerged in 2007 but now has 95 members from
64 universities-all full-time international safety officers.
Their growing numbers reflect a shift in the resources
universities are devoting to international travel safety.
"What caused the major shift?" says Bull. "Certainly
9/11 was a seminal moment in terms of awareness that
things happen everywhere. I think there was grow-

ing realization that the students studying abroad had a
unique exposure that was different and required a different kind of thinking and attention."
At the same time, an increase in instantaneous
communication led to higher expectations for quicker
responses to crises, he says, and those quicker responses
required increased capacity in administrations.

Leading from the Center
Still, the majority of universities have chosen not to
create specialized positions or haven't had the resources
to do so. Some have responded to the increased risk
associated with growing international programs by
centralizing the role in new ways.
At Campbell University, a regional private college near
North Carolina's research triangle, the administration
rebranded its study abroad office in 2017 into a global
engagement office. With the move, Donna Waldron,
formerly the director of study abroad, is now the dean
of global engagement. In practical terms, that means all
international travel-whether a faculty-led program or an
athletic trip abroad-now goes through her office.
Waldron started at the university 10 years ago, when
it sent just 13 students abroad on a single faculty-led trip
per year. Now, the university sends 120 or so students
on international trips.
"A couple years ago we realized the staff hadn't
changed but the workload had really changed, and if you
can't throw manpower at it, you can throw authority
at it," Waldron says. "A lot of universities neglect to mandate from the president's office that everybody needs to
be on board with this for the protection of our students.
They have responsibility but no authority."
Back at the University of Kentucky, centralizing information has so far paid off, Jason Hope says. The Paris
attacks in 2015 tested not only the new registration system but the newly minted team's crisis communication
plan. "It was 5 p.m. on a Friday here in Kentucky," Hope
R I S K M A N AG E M E N T * J A N.+ F E B .18

INTERNATIONAL EDUCATOR

7



Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of International Educator - January/February 2018

From the Desk of
Frontlines
In Brief
Global Spotlight: Malaysia
Quick Questions
Feature: Recruiting Farther Upstream: U.S. Institutions Are Exploring New Opportunities Among International High School Students
Feature: CASE STUDY: The Business of Global Engagement
Feature: Middle Class Rising: As the Number of Families with Discretionary Income Grows, So Do Prospects for More International Students
Education Abroad
International Student Affairs
International Enrollment
International Education Leadership
Forum
In Focus
Feature: Minimizing Risk, Maximizing Results
Advertiser Listings & Index
International Educator - January/February 2018 - BB1
International Educator - January/February 2018 - BB2
International Educator - January/February 2018 - Cover1
International Educator - January/February 2018 - Cover2
International Educator - January/February 2018 - 1
International Educator - January/February 2018 - 2
International Educator - January/February 2018 - 3
International Educator - January/February 2018 - 4
International Educator - January/February 2018 - 5
International Educator - January/February 2018 - 6
International Educator - January/February 2018 - 7
International Educator - January/February 2018 - From the Desk of
International Educator - January/February 2018 - Frontlines
International Educator - January/February 2018 - In Brief
International Educator - January/February 2018 - 11
International Educator - January/February 2018 - 12
International Educator - January/February 2018 - 13
International Educator - January/February 2018 - Global Spotlight: Malaysia
International Educator - January/February 2018 - 15
International Educator - January/February 2018 - Quick Questions
International Educator - January/February 2018 - 17
International Educator - January/February 2018 - Feature: Recruiting Farther Upstream: U.S. Institutions Are Exploring New Opportunities Among International High School Students
International Educator - January/February 2018 - 19
International Educator - January/February 2018 - 20
International Educator - January/February 2018 - 21
International Educator - January/February 2018 - Feature: CASE STUDY: The Business of Global Engagement
International Educator - January/February 2018 - 23
International Educator - January/February 2018 - 24
International Educator - January/February 2018 - 25
International Educator - January/February 2018 - Feature: Middle Class Rising: As the Number of Families with Discretionary Income Grows, So Do Prospects for More International Students
International Educator - January/February 2018 - 27
International Educator - January/February 2018 - 28
International Educator - January/February 2018 - 29
International Educator - January/February 2018 - Education Abroad
International Educator - January/February 2018 - 31
International Educator - January/February 2018 - International Student Affairs
International Educator - January/February 2018 - 33
International Educator - January/February 2018 - International Enrollment
International Educator - January/February 2018 - 35
International Educator - January/February 2018 - International Education Leadership
International Educator - January/February 2018 - 37
International Educator - January/February 2018 - Forum
International Educator - January/February 2018 - 39
International Educator - January/February 2018 - In Focus
International Educator - January/February 2018 - Cover3
International Educator - January/February 2018 - Cover4
International Educator - January/February 2018 - SCover1
International Educator - January/February 2018 - SCover2
International Educator - January/February 2018 - S3
International Educator - January/February 2018 - Feature: Minimizing Risk, Maximizing Results
International Educator - January/February 2018 - S5
International Educator - January/February 2018 - S6
International Educator - January/February 2018 - S7
International Educator - January/February 2018 - S8
International Educator - January/February 2018 - S9
International Educator - January/February 2018 - Advertiser Listings & Index
International Educator - January/February 2018 - SCover3
International Educator - January/February 2018 - SCover4
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