Spray Foam Professional - Fall 2012 - (Page 17)

SAFETY FIRST INDUSTRY RESEARCH ON SPF INSULATION CENTER FOR POLYURETHANES INDUSTRY (CPI) PROVIDES UPDATES ON TWO PROJECTS S ince 2009, the ACC Center for Polyurethanes Industry (CPI) has worked to answer several questions posed by federal agency representatives. These questions relate to the installation of spray polyurethane foam (SPF) and to the fi nal product itself. One project is to develop an emissions testing protocol specific to SPF insulation and the other project is to consider changes in ventilation rates on the airborne concentrations of chemical vapors and particulates associated with SPF application work. Both projects are underway now and regular updates are provided at the annual CPI Technical Conference and other sprayfoam meetings throughout the year. PRODUCT EMISSION TESTING PROTOCOL A CPI Work Group was organized to develop a testing protocol to evaluate potential emissions released from samples of SPF foam samples. The protocol will help spray polyurethane foam insulation (SPFI) manufacturers evaluate their particular SPF insulation products for potential chemical emissions (i.e., the potential release of chemicals into the air from cured installed foam). In this project, CPI works with the ASTM Subcommittee D22.05, a Task Group on SPF Emissions that was formed at the ASTM D22 Air Quality Meeting, October 2010. This Group created “Work Item WK30960,” which includes “New standard determination of volatile organic compounds, diisocyanates, oligomeric isocyanates, amine catalysts, fi re retardants and other potential constituents emitted from spray polyurethane foam insulation (SPFI) products designed for on-site application in buildings.” The current ASTM draft standard practice consists of procedures for the creation, collection and handling of test samples representative of both closedcell and open-cell SPFI products and for the preparation of test specimens. Specimens produced in this manner can be tested for potential chemical emissions, using small scale test chambers. This work can help to develop innovative approaches to consider regarding indoor air quality (IAQ) testing of SPF insulation and what to consider when establishing building re-occupancy times after installation of SPFI products. This ASTM Protocol will provide an evaluation of the SPFI product’s potential impact on IAQ and considerations for: 1) establishing an “airing out” or “reoccupancy” time period following installation during which time occupancy is not permitted, 2) ventilation time period after installation. EFFECT OF VENTILATION ON APPLICATOR EXPOSURE A CPI Work Group was organized to research the effectiveness of various ventilation rates on emissions during SPF application. This research consists of three phases: 1) Testing of spray equipment and generic formulations; 2) Monitoring chemical emissions during SPF application under controlled environmental conditions; and 3) Conducting field testing to verify Phase 2 results. Phase 1 tested spray equipment, generic formulations, and verified the suitability of generic SPF formulations for spray application for this research. All tests were conducted under ambient conditions. Three formulations were tested: 0.5 and 2 pounds per cubic foot (pcf) formulations and a low pressure kit formulation. Samples were applied using spray equipment suggested by the system manufacturer, as well as Manufacturer-recommended pressure and temperature. Phase 2 includes personal and area air monitoring while generic SPF formulations are applied under controlled air exchange rates and environmental conditions. Again, 0.5 and 2 pounds formulations will be sprayed using typical industry high pressure equipment and low pressure kit formulations are sprayed using manufacturer supplied equipment. A Spray room, 8 ft x 8 ft x 8 ft ventilated enclosure with make-up air at 75°F/50% humidity, will be used for Phase 2 studies. Monitoring is being conducted at various Air Changes per Hour (ACH) by an independent certified Industrial Hygiene contractor. The components to be evaluated include MDI/ PMDI, amine catalysts, blowing agents, and a fi re retardant. Monitoring is done at least in triplicate at each ventilation rate. Phase 2 is underway now. Phase 3 will consist of monitoring conducted in a medium-sized residential building during the application of the 3 generic formulations. The work area will be equipped with ventilation units capable of providing air exchange rates as indicated from Phase 2 results. The purpose of this phase is to determine if air exchange rates used in Phase 2 provide similar results in the Phase 3 field study. This research can provide helpful information on ventilation considerations during SPF application for SPF suppliers and applicators to consider in their handling and use of SPF insulation products. o For more information on the ACC Center for Polyurethanes Industry research projects, contact Heather Palfrey at Heather_Palfrey@americanchemistry.com. www.sprayfoam.org | SPRAYFOAM PROFESSIONAL 17 http://www.sprayfoam.org

Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of Spray Foam Professional - Fall 2012

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR’S CORNER
PRESIDENT’S POST
FOAM BUSINESS NEWS
SPFA TODAY
ABAA NEWS
LEGISLATIVE UPDATE
SAFETY FIRST
BEHIND THE FOAM
2012 SPFA CONTRACTOR AWARDS
GETTING SUSTAINABLE ROOFING RIGHT
MILITARY STANDARDS AND SPRAY POLYURETHANE FOAM INSULATION – PART 2
IRAQ – U.S. MILITARY IN IRAQ BENEFITS FROM PERFORMANCE OF SPF
ASK THE EXPERT
UPCOMING EVENTS
INDEX OF ADVERTISERS/ADVERTISERS.COM

Spray Foam Professional - Fall 2012

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