Pharmaceutical Commerce - July/August 2011 - (Page 16)

Brand Marketing Communications For now, he says the company is taking a “letter-of-the-law approach,” even he’s left wondering which letters to which laws to follow. Like most pharmacos, Genentech has a public statement of principles, based on parent Roche (see box, p. 34). Most of the rules are not specific to social media, except to note that comments posted in a seemingly local or private site have a way of ricocheting around the world. Marketing agency leaders say that it’s just as well that DDMAC hasn’t come out with rulemaking, simply because the medium is changing so quickly. In just the past few months, for example: • Google announced that it was shutting down Google Health, an early effort to get electronic health records (EHRs) organized for consumers; at the same time, it has started up Google+, its answer to Facebook. • Microsoft, which has a service, Health Vault, that competed with Google Health, has gone ahead and acquired FDA registration for the service as a medical device. • In April, Facebook announced that it would no longer allow users to disable comments, a rule that already affects new Pages and coming to existing pages by August 15, according to numerous agency sources. Matthew Snodgrass, director of social media for San Francisco-based agency WCG, was one of the first to dissect pre-announcement details and note the exceptions that will apply to pharmaceutical companies: • Pages that promote, talk about, or support prescription drugs or devices • Pages that focus on a disease state where there is only one prescribed treatment (even if the Page doesn’t mention the treatment) • Disease-state/therapeutic area Pages that have the PI/ISI on the Page This means that corporate Pages, general disease awareness Pages, and unbranded campaign Pages will have their comments reenabled for their Walls, photos, and videos. Other details of this change are detailed in the below presentation. Jonathan Richman, group director of insights and planning at WPP’s interactive agency arm, Possible Worldwide(www.possibleworldwide.com) notes that “whitelisting” will apply and gives a detailed explanation at his blog, www.doseofdigital.com. Listening in So what happens after August 15? Some pharma companies may ditch Facebook as a channel, but that’s not necessary, says Joe Doyle, interactive director at Austin, TX-based agency HCB Health (www.hcbhealth.com), because the social manager will likely be using a software tool like Radian6 (www.radian6.com), or any of the dozens of competing offerings such as Nielsen’s BuzzMetrics, ThoughtBuzz, Lithium, which scan the Internet with special emphasis on social elements for all mentions of a brand and allow companies moderate, monitor and correct statements that put the company at regulatory risk because with or without DDMAC guidelines or a formal rule, the rules of engagement are “very black and white. We all know what our boundaries are, what we can and can’t say regarding standards such as fair balance and off-label content.” One of the more recent developments from Radian6 is a partnership with Asentech (http://beta.asentechllc.com), whose new, combined system trolls a claimed 330 million sites every five minutes to offer ratings like other systems, with a difference: The partners have added a staff of physicians and pharmacists to mediate the data for pharma brand manger users before pulling the trigger on weekly or monthly reports. © PRESSUREUA/ISTOCKPHOTO.COM Social Media: An Irresistible Force Colliding With an Unmovable Object Following FDA’s punt of regulations for social media, industry is scratching its collective head over how to utilize these channels By Bob Sperber T ake one of the most dynamic transformations in any form of media occurring right now—the rise of social media like Facebook, Twitter and the rest—and factor in that marketing and advertising agencies themselves are heavily vested in exploiting the possibilities of the new, digital cornucopia. Then layer in the reality that almost month by month, the “norms” of social media (if such a concept can be recognized) are changing. Now throw this tidal wave against the careful, deliberate traditions of FDA regulation of healthcare communications. The result: a lot (a LOT!) of sound and fury, but relatively little movement by pharma companies into the social sphere. FDA, without coming right out and saying so, has postponed providing rules on pharmacos’ use of social media (and has indicated that it is likely to provide “guidance” rather than actual rules). In turn, pharma marketing and communications leaders are dabbling around the fringes of the social media movement, while mostly building more websites and buying banners through online marketing networks. Behind the scenes, though, pharmacos appear to be quite active in monitoring online discussions and commentary—itself an evolving type of marketing service for themselves. Living without guidelines In 2009, FDA’s Div. of Drug Marketing, Advertising and Communications (DDMAC) held public hearings over online marketing and communications (Pharmaceutical Commerce, Nov/Dec 2009, p. 6), which brought out many thought leaders among online companies, public interest groups and manufacturers. DDMAC hoped to use the commentary to develop communication standards in 2010, but at the end of that year, delayed them to this year. Social media, as such, were somewhat on the periphery then; a lot of the discussion revolved around getting fair balance into banners (which, it turned out, has become fairly easy to do). But one issue that was prominent then—and remains so today—is whether manufacturers are obliged to handle product complaints that might be expressed anywhere on the Web as reportable adverse events (AEs). In January, the agency dropped online drug promotion, including social media, from its Guidance Agenda publishing plans for 2011, leading industry watchers like John Mack, the blogging “Pharmaguy,” to ask, “Is this supposed to be the promised guidance we’ve all been waiting for?” For its part, DDMAC is keeping its cards close to the chest. “It is difficult to provide a timeframe for the issuance of our guidances or related ‘milestones’ due to the extensive work and review process, or GGPs [good guidance practices],” DDMAC announced in a letter. “Our goal is to provide well vetted, meaningful, and useful guidances articulating our current thinking on various topics related to Internet/social media promotion.” Asked whether he thinks the FDA has given-up on the effort to produce guidelines, James Musick, director of social media and web communications for Genentech, says “the more I dig into social media, the more I find that it’s extraordinarily complex. So I don’t think it’s so much a back-burner issue for the FDA as it is that they’re realizing what we have realized, which is that it’s not easy to do.” “Night Nurse Nation” is a Facebook page for hospital nurses, built by AblesonTaylor for Abbott Nutrition 16 July | August 2011 www.PharmaceuticalCommerce.com http://www.possibleworldwide.com http://www.possibleworldwide.com http://www.doseofdigital.com http://www.hcbhealth.com http://www.hcbhealth.com http://www.radian6.com http://beta.asentechllc.com http://www.PharmaceuticalCommerce.com

Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of Pharmaceutical Commerce - July/August 2011

Pharmaceutical Commerce - July/August 2011
Contents
Op-Ed
Top News
Business/Finance
Brand Communications
Supply Chain/Logistics
Manufacturing & Packaging
Legal/Regulatory
Information Technology
PDMA Exhibitors
Meetings and Editorial Index

Pharmaceutical Commerce - July/August 2011

Pharmaceutical Commerce - July/August 2011 - Pharmaceutical Commerce - July/August 2011 (Page Cover1)
Pharmaceutical Commerce - July/August 2011 - Pharmaceutical Commerce - July/August 2011 (Page Cover2)
Pharmaceutical Commerce - July/August 2011 - Pharmaceutical Commerce - July/August 2011 (Page 3)
Pharmaceutical Commerce - July/August 2011 - Contents (Page 4)
Pharmaceutical Commerce - July/August 2011 - Contents (Page 5)
Pharmaceutical Commerce - July/August 2011 - Contents (Page 6)
Pharmaceutical Commerce - July/August 2011 - Op-Ed (Page 7)
Pharmaceutical Commerce - July/August 2011 - Top News (Page 8)
Pharmaceutical Commerce - July/August 2011 - Top News (Page 9)
Pharmaceutical Commerce - July/August 2011 - Top News (Page 10)
Pharmaceutical Commerce - July/August 2011 - Top News (Page 11)
Pharmaceutical Commerce - July/August 2011 - Business/Finance (Page 12)
Pharmaceutical Commerce - July/August 2011 - Business/Finance (Page 13)
Pharmaceutical Commerce - July/August 2011 - Business/Finance (Page 14)
Pharmaceutical Commerce - July/August 2011 - Business/Finance (Page 15)
Pharmaceutical Commerce - July/August 2011 - Brand Communications (Page 16)
Pharmaceutical Commerce - July/August 2011 - Brand Communications (Page 17)
Pharmaceutical Commerce - July/August 2011 - Brand Communications (Page 18)
Pharmaceutical Commerce - July/August 2011 - Brand Communications (Page 19)
Pharmaceutical Commerce - July/August 2011 - Supply Chain/Logistics (Page 20)
Pharmaceutical Commerce - July/August 2011 - Supply Chain/Logistics (Page 21)
Pharmaceutical Commerce - July/August 2011 - Supply Chain/Logistics (Page 22)
Pharmaceutical Commerce - July/August 2011 - Supply Chain/Logistics (Page 23)
Pharmaceutical Commerce - July/August 2011 - Supply Chain/Logistics (Page 24)
Pharmaceutical Commerce - July/August 2011 - Manufacturing & Packaging (Page 25)
Pharmaceutical Commerce - July/August 2011 - Manufacturing & Packaging (Page 26)
Pharmaceutical Commerce - July/August 2011 - Manufacturing & Packaging (Page 27)
Pharmaceutical Commerce - July/August 2011 - Legal/Regulatory (Page 28)
Pharmaceutical Commerce - July/August 2011 - Legal/Regulatory (Page 29)
Pharmaceutical Commerce - July/August 2011 - Information Technology (Page 30)
Pharmaceutical Commerce - July/August 2011 - Information Technology (Page 31)
Pharmaceutical Commerce - July/August 2011 - PDMA Exhibitors (Page 32)
Pharmaceutical Commerce - July/August 2011 - PDMA Exhibitors (Page 33)
Pharmaceutical Commerce - July/August 2011 - PDMA Exhibitors (Page 34)
Pharmaceutical Commerce - July/August 2011 - Meetings and Editorial Index (Page 35)
Pharmaceutical Commerce - July/August 2011 - Meetings and Editorial Index (Page Cover4)
http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/pharmcomm/201911
http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/pharmcomm/201909
http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/pharmcomm/201906
http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/pharmcomm/201903
http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/pharmcomm/201811
http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/pharmcomm/201809
http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/pharmcomm/201806
http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/pharmcomm/20180304
http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/pharmcomm/20171112
http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/pharmcomm/20170910
http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/pharmcomm/20170708
http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/pharmcomm/20170506
http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/pharmcomm/20170304
http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/pharmcomm/20170102
http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/pharmcomm/20161112
http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/pharmcomm/20160910
http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/pharmcomm/20160708
http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/pharmcomm/20160506
http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/pharmcomm/20160304
http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/pharmcomm/20160102
http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/pharmcomm/20151112
http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/pharmcomm/20150910
http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/pharmcomm/20150708
http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/pharmcomm/20150506
http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/pharmcomm/20150304
http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/pharmcomm/20150102
http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/pharmcomm/20141112
http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/pharmcomm/coldchaindirectory2014
http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/pharmcomm/20140910
http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/pharmcomm/20140708
http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/pharmcomm/20140506
http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/pharmcomm/20140304
http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/pharmcomm/20140102
http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/pharmcomm/dataservicedirectory
http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/pharmcomm/20131112
http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/pharmcomm/20130910_hubreport
http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/pharmcomm/20130910
http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/pharmcomm/20130708
http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/pharmcomm/20130506
http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/pharmcomm/coldchain2013
http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/pharmcomm/20130304
http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/pharmcomm/20130102
http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/pharmcomm/20121112
http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/pharmcomm/20120910
http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/pharmcomm/20120708
http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/pharmcomm/20120506
http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/pharmcomm/20120506_coldchain
http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/pharmcomm/20120304
http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/pharmcomm/20120102
http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/pharmcomm/20111112
http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/pharmcomm/20110910
http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/pharmcomm/20110708
http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/pharmcomm/20110506
http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/pharmcomm/20110304
http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/pharmcomm/20110102
http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/pharmcomm/20101112
http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/pharmcomm/20100910
http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/pharmcomm/20100708
http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/pharmcomm/20100506
http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/pharmcomm/201004
http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/pharmcomm/201003
http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/pharmcomm/20100102
http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/pharmcomm/20091112
http://www.nxtbookMEDIA.com