Mailing Systems Technology - May/June 2010 - (Page 8)

Real Life Management In my last column, I explained that I believe there are five absolutes (best practices) for getting high performance and great results. I shared absolutes one (Get everyone on the same page: Focus on the purpose of the organization) and two (Prepare for battle: Equip your operation with tools, talents and technology) with you; check out the March/April issue of Mailing Systems Technology if you’d like a refresher before tackling absolutes three, four and five. With Wes Friesen Best Practices of Effective Leaders: Part Two “Everything rises and falls on leadership. —John C. Maxwell ” The Top 10 Keys to Motivation In a nutshell, here are ten ways to help motivate employees: 1. Provide personal thanks. 2. Make time for employees. 3. Provide specific feedback. 4. Create an open (and fun) work environment. 5. Provide information. 6. Involve employees in decisions. 7. Reward high performers (and deal with poor performers). 8. Develop a sense of ownership. 9. Give chances to grow and learn. 10. Celebrate successes. Absolute 3. Stoke the fire for performance: Create a climate for results. To be effective leaders, we must create an operational climate that provides ongoing performance measurement and feedback, motivates people and removes barriers to performance in an ongoing and systematic fashion. One essential ingredient to create the climate we desire is to remove the fear of making occasional, inconsequential mistakes. The reality is that we all make mistakes, and mistakes can actually be helpful if we learn from them and avoid similar mistakes in the future. The great philosopher Edward Phelps said, “The man who makes no mistakes does normally not make anything. Being a ” sports fan, I like these quotes from Babe Ruth: “Don’t let the fear of striking out get in your way” and Wayne Gretzky: “You miss every shot you do not take. ” As leaders, we want to promote calculated risk taking. One of my sayings is, “The wise take calculated risks… fools take careless risks… the cowardly take no risks at all. Let’s not be careless or ” cowardly, but master the art of taking calculated risks in striving for better results. In terms of motivating employees, refer back to my March-April 2009 column on “Recognition — The Missing Ingredient to Great Results. ” employees and other people in our lives our “BEST” will result in stronger relationships: Absolute 4. Build bridges on the road to results: Nurture relationships with people. This absolute challenges us to identify, foster, nurture and sustain relationships; practice effective communication; and foster cooperation through the practice of trustworthy leadership with the people you need to get results. To build relationships we must focus on helping others. Jesus was quoted as saying, “It is better to give than to receive. Giving our ” 8 MAY-JUNE 2010 a www.MailingSystemsTechnology.com Believe in them Encourage them Support them Trust them Another tool that works is to consistently use the 3 “Rs” when dealing with people: Recognize (show appreciation for skills and good performance) Reward (include both monetary and non-monetary rewards) Respect (Golden Rule — treat people positively like you would like to be treated) http://www.MailingSystemsTechnology.com

Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of Mailing Systems Technology - May/June 2010

Mailing Systems Technology - May/June 2010
Contents
Editor’s Note
Real-Life Management
Everything IMBC
Ship It
The Trenches
Software Byte
Best Practices
From the Source
An Expert’s Take
De-Bunking a Myth
Finding the Opportunity
Capture Hidden Savings
Application Article
Reality Check
Pushing the Envelope

Mailing Systems Technology - May/June 2010

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