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Hospital Pharmacy 52(5)

Table 2. The Responses for Assessing Attitude and Practice Strategies Adopted by Health Care Personnel.
Question
Have you ever reported an ADR?
Yes
No
Does ADR reporting damage the professional image?
Yes
No
Factors that encourage ADR reporting
Seriousness of the ADRs
Unusualness of the reaction
Involvement of a new drug
Confidence in diagnosis an ADR
Factors that discourage ADR reporting
Did not know how or where to report an ADR
Did not think it important
Lack of access to ADR reporting forms
Managing patient was more important than ADR reporting
Patient confidentiality issues
Concerns about legal and professional liability
To detect an ADR
Only ask patient
Only monitor patient report
All of the above
Action taken when an ADR is suspected
Stop medicine
Prescribe appropriate medicine to control the ADR
Record all details and report to the governmental health ministry
Record all the details and report to the manufacturer
If the ADR is well known for medicine, tell the patient not to worry
Which ADR to report
All ADRs
Serious ADRs
ADRs to new drugs
Unknown ADRs to old drugs
None

Doctor

Community pharmacist

Hospital pharmacist

P

19%
81%

14%
86%

12.1%
87.8%

NS

18.7%
81.3%

16.7%
83.3%

12.1%
87.8%

NS

16.0%
43.8%
50.8%
31.3%

85.7%
42.9%
26.2%
21.4%

81.8%
33.3%
51.5%
42.4%

NS

100%
0.6%
43.8%
25%
12.5%
6.3%

78.6%
4.8%
31%
47.6%
16.6%
19%

100%
6.1%
45.5%
27.3%
21.2%
24.2%

NS

25%
6.3%
68.8%

16.7%
7.1%
78.6%

12.1%
3.0%
84.8%

NS

50%
37.5%
6.3%
0%
6.3%

35.7%
31%
9.5%
4.8%
19%

39.4%
15.2%
9.1%
9.1%
27.3%

NS

62.5%
18.8%
6.3%
12.5%
0%

26.2%
50%
11.9%
7.1%
4.8%

45.5%
39.4%
9.1%
3.0%
3.0%

NS

Note. Significance, p < .05. ADR = adverse drug reaction; NS = nonsignificant.

study. Only 19%, 14%, and 12.1% of medical doctors, community pharmacists, and hospital pharmacists have ever
reported an ADR. There is an urgent need to educate health
care personnel about proper reporting guidelines imposed by
HAAD pharmacovigilance policy. A positive correlation
between knowledge and attitudes toward ADRs reporting
was identified in an earlier UAE study.16
Regarding the most qualified person to report an ADR
(where more than one answer was allowed), the response
rates were highest for the pharmacists (87.9%) and then
medical practitioners (68.1%) and nurses (32.9%). The
majority of responders (87.9%) clearly viewed pharmacists
as the most qualified professional group to report an ADR.
This result may be biased by the fact that pharmacists were
the major responders to this questionnaire, representing
82.5% with only 17.6% doctors involved. It also suggests

that there is a strong belief that ADR reporting is a fundamental role of pharmacists.24,25 This was similarly found in
previous studies in the UAE16 and Saudi Arabia.19 Higher
response rates of 100% were also encountered by previous
studies in Malaysia7 and the Netherlands.6
According to American Society of Health-System
Pharmacists (ASHP) guidelines, pharmacists are important
experts on drugs. They are pivotal in the development, maintenance, and ongoing evaluation of ADR programs and lead
the education of health professionals regarding potential
ADRs.25
Health care personnel were aware of the problem of poor
ADR reporting; 73.6% suggested more education and awareness of ADR reporting system were required and 47% suggested increasing the awareness to health care personnel.
Approximately 37.4% suggested increasing the awareness of



Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of Hospital Pharmacy - May 2017

Editorial, For Sale: FDA Priority Review Vouchers
Current FDA-Related Drug Information; Approvals, Submission, and Important Labeling Changes for US Marketed Pharmaceuticals
Summaries of Safety Labeling Changes Approved by the FDA: Boxed Warnings
ISMP Adverse Drug Reactions: Levofloxacin-Induced Neuroexcitation and Hallucinations Statin-Induced Muscle Rupture Mefloquine-Induced Rhabdomyolysis Methimazole-Induced
Critical Care Pharmacist Market Perceptions: Comparison of Critical Care Program Directors and Directors of Pharmacy
Capecitabine, Oxaliplatin, and Bevacizumab (BCapOx) Regimen for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer
Clinical Pharmacy Discharge Counseling Service and the Impact on Readmission Rates in High-Risk Patients
Mannitol Prescribing Practices With Cisplatin Before and After an Educational Newsletter Intervention
Pharmacists’ Knowledge of the Cost of Laboratory Testing
Adverse Drug Reaction Reporting Practices Among United Arab Emirates Pharmacists and Prescribers
Postoperative Pain Management With Liposomal Bupivacaine in Patients Undergoing Orthopedic Knee and Hip Arthroplasty at a Community Hospital
Formulary Drug Reviews
Hospital Pharmacy - May 2017 - 317
Hospital Pharmacy - May 2017 - 318
Hospital Pharmacy - May 2017 - 319
Hospital Pharmacy - May 2017 - 320
Hospital Pharmacy - May 2017 - 321
Hospital Pharmacy - May 2017 - 322
Hospital Pharmacy - May 2017 - 323
Hospital Pharmacy - May 2017 - Editorial, For Sale: FDA Priority Review Vouchers
Hospital Pharmacy - May 2017 - 325
Hospital Pharmacy - May 2017 - Current FDA-Related Drug Information; Approvals, Submission, and Important Labeling Changes for US Marketed Pharmaceuticals
Hospital Pharmacy - May 2017 - Summaries of Safety Labeling Changes Approved by the FDA: Boxed Warnings
Hospital Pharmacy - May 2017 - 328
Hospital Pharmacy - May 2017 - 329
Hospital Pharmacy - May 2017 - ISMP Adverse Drug Reactions: Levofloxacin-Induced Neuroexcitation and Hallucinations Statin-Induced Muscle Rupture Mefloquine-Induced Rhabdomyolysis Methimazole-Induced
Hospital Pharmacy - May 2017 - 331
Hospital Pharmacy - May 2017 - 332
Hospital Pharmacy - May 2017 - 333
Hospital Pharmacy - May 2017 - Critical Care Pharmacist Market Perceptions: Comparison of Critical Care Program Directors and Directors of Pharmacy
Hospital Pharmacy - May 2017 - 335
Hospital Pharmacy - May 2017 - 336
Hospital Pharmacy - May 2017 - 337
Hospital Pharmacy - May 2017 - 338
Hospital Pharmacy - May 2017 - 339
Hospital Pharmacy - May 2017 - 340
Hospital Pharmacy - May 2017 - Capecitabine, Oxaliplatin, and Bevacizumab (BCapOx) Regimen for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer
Hospital Pharmacy - May 2017 - 342
Hospital Pharmacy - May 2017 - 343
Hospital Pharmacy - May 2017 - 344
Hospital Pharmacy - May 2017 - 345
Hospital Pharmacy - May 2017 - 346
Hospital Pharmacy - May 2017 - 347
Hospital Pharmacy - May 2017 - Clinical Pharmacy Discharge Counseling Service and the Impact on Readmission Rates in High-Risk Patients
Hospital Pharmacy - May 2017 - 349
Hospital Pharmacy - May 2017 - 350
Hospital Pharmacy - May 2017 - 351
Hospital Pharmacy - May 2017 - 352
Hospital Pharmacy - May 2017 - Mannitol Prescribing Practices With Cisplatin Before and After an Educational Newsletter Intervention
Hospital Pharmacy - May 2017 - 354
Hospital Pharmacy - May 2017 - 355
Hospital Pharmacy - May 2017 - 356
Hospital Pharmacy - May 2017 - Pharmacists’ Knowledge of the Cost of Laboratory Testing
Hospital Pharmacy - May 2017 - 358
Hospital Pharmacy - May 2017 - 359
Hospital Pharmacy - May 2017 - 360
Hospital Pharmacy - May 2017 - Adverse Drug Reaction Reporting Practices Among United Arab Emirates Pharmacists and Prescribers
Hospital Pharmacy - May 2017 - 362
Hospital Pharmacy - May 2017 - 363
Hospital Pharmacy - May 2017 - 364
Hospital Pharmacy - May 2017 - 365
Hospital Pharmacy - May 2017 - 366
Hospital Pharmacy - May 2017 - Postoperative Pain Management With Liposomal Bupivacaine in Patients Undergoing Orthopedic Knee and Hip Arthroplasty at a Community Hospital
Hospital Pharmacy - May 2017 - 368
Hospital Pharmacy - May 2017 - 369
Hospital Pharmacy - May 2017 - 370
Hospital Pharmacy - May 2017 - 371
Hospital Pharmacy - May 2017 - 372
Hospital Pharmacy - May 2017 - 373
Hospital Pharmacy - May 2017 - Formulary Drug Reviews
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Hospital Pharmacy - May 2017 - 376
Hospital Pharmacy - May 2017 - 377
Hospital Pharmacy - May 2017 - 378
Hospital Pharmacy - May 2017 - 379
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