Short Line Connector - Fall 2016 - 20


Photo courtesy of Everett Railroad

Photo courtesy of Farmrail System, Inc.

FEATURE STORY

Everett Railroad President Alan Maples regularly hosts Penn State
Altoona students who are enrolled in the university's rail transportation
engineering program.

tation engineering (RTE). In this program,
students gain the in-depth engineering
and mathematics education required to
meet the challenges facing today's railroad
industry. With cutting-edge training in
civil infrastructure, signaling, mechanical
design and maintenance and railway operations, RTE graduates are poised to become
the leaders of tomorrow's railroads.
RTE students have held internships
at Farmrail, Curry Rail Services, Amtrak
and several Class I railroads. The program
graduated nine students in spring 2015 and
four students in spring 2016, said Stephen
Dillen, an instructor in electrical engineering
at the school. Graduates have gone on
to jobs at AECOM, Siemens and several
railroads with an average salary of $64,500.
The Industry Advisory Board for the RTE
program at Penn State Altoona is comprised
of a diverse cross-section of high-level railroad industry professionals and has played
a key role in developing the RTE program
and steering efforts in order to effectively
address the needs of the railroad industry.
ASLRRA Vice President Jo Strang serves
on the advisory board of the program, and
Alan Maples, president of Everett Railroad,
volunteers his time and pockets of valuable
track time on his 23-mile railroad based in
Duncansville, Pennsylvania, for Penn State

20

Farmrail's George Betke (center) hosts the next generation of
railroaders, Jake Leopold, son of Tom Leopold, and Chris McCarren,
son of Reilly McCarren.

"For the most part, railroaders are self-taught selfstarters. Our job is to hire brainpower with the right
attitude, invest time and effort via mentoring and provide
challenges across departments to foster growth."
-Judy Petry, president and general manager, Farmrail System, Inc.
RTE students to get an up-close view of railroad operations. Student field trips, like the
one to Everett Railroad, are an integral part
of the overall education and allow hands-on
training for students in the RTE program.

Summer Solutions
Introducing students to railroading is
another key initiative to spark interest in
our dynamic and critical industry. When
considering a career in transportation,
freight rail is an often-overlooked vertical.
Michigan Tech hosts its Rail and Intermodal Transportation Summer Youth
Program each year, providing an opportunity for high school students to learn about
the industry via classroom work and field
trips to railroads, dispatch centers, locomotive shops and even a scenic railway tour.
The Transportation Research Board's
(TRB) Committee on Rail Transportation
sponsors an award-winning opportunity

SHORT LINE CONNECTOR // FALL 2016

for college students called "Summerail."
Hosted by Union Pacific in Council Bluffs,
Iowa, this year's agenda featured discussions by industry educators and leaders,
including Jerry Vest, senior vice president
of government and industry affairs at
Genessee & Wyoming, and tours of a
variety of rail facilities.
Forrest Van Schwartz, managing
director at the Global Transportation
Consultancy, is a 54-year industry veteran
and a passionate advocate for Summerail.
Van Schwartz, a product of New York
Central's management training program,
underscores the importance of experiential
learning. "You need to get beyond the
PowerPoint recruitment presentation and
allow students to get out on the railroad.
The beauty of Summerail is the opportunity to have young and 'old' folks out
on the railroad intermingling and sharing
their expertise and passion."



Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of Short Line Connector - Fall 2016

No label
Short Line Connector - Fall 2016 - Cover1
Short Line Connector - Fall 2016 - Cover2
Short Line Connector - Fall 2016 - No label
Short Line Connector - Fall 2016 - 2
Short Line Connector - Fall 2016 - 3
Short Line Connector - Fall 2016 - 4
Short Line Connector - Fall 2016 - 5
Short Line Connector - Fall 2016 - 6
Short Line Connector - Fall 2016 - 7
Short Line Connector - Fall 2016 - 8
Short Line Connector - Fall 2016 - 9
Short Line Connector - Fall 2016 - 10
Short Line Connector - Fall 2016 - 11
Short Line Connector - Fall 2016 - 12
Short Line Connector - Fall 2016 - 13
Short Line Connector - Fall 2016 - 14
Short Line Connector - Fall 2016 - 15
Short Line Connector - Fall 2016 - 16
Short Line Connector - Fall 2016 - 17
Short Line Connector - Fall 2016 - 18
Short Line Connector - Fall 2016 - 19
Short Line Connector - Fall 2016 - 20
Short Line Connector - Fall 2016 - 21
Short Line Connector - Fall 2016 - 22
Short Line Connector - Fall 2016 - 23
Short Line Connector - Fall 2016 - 24
Short Line Connector - Fall 2016 - 25
Short Line Connector - Fall 2016 - 26
Short Line Connector - Fall 2016 - 27
Short Line Connector - Fall 2016 - 28
Short Line Connector - Fall 2016 - 29
Short Line Connector - Fall 2016 - 30
Short Line Connector - Fall 2016 - 31
Short Line Connector - Fall 2016 - 32
Short Line Connector - Fall 2016 - Cover3
Short Line Connector - Fall 2016 - Cover4
http://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ASLRRA/summer19
http://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ASLRRA/spring19
http://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ASLRRA/winter19
http://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ASLRRA/fall18
http://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ASLRRA/summer18
http://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ASLRRA/spring18
http://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ASLRRA/winter18
http://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ASLRRA/fall17
http://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ASLRRA/summer17
http://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ASLRRA/FactsAndFigures
http://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ASLRRA/spring17
http://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ASLRRA/winter17
http://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ASLRRA/fall16
http://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ASLRRA/summer16
http://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ASLRRA/spring2016
http://www.nxtbookMEDIA.com