Short Line Connector - Fall 2016 - 25


Photos courtesy of Georgetown
Rail Equipment

The GREX Aurora® system provides railroads with several different methods to view and analyze the collected data.

commuter and transit lines. GREX has
continually improved the system, adding
the ability to inspect fasteners, anchors,
joints, turnouts, grade crossings and
open-deck bridges along the way.
The initial scans on the IAIS system
consisted of approximately 120 miles of
automated inspection, and the scans were
performed in a few hours within available
track time windows. IAIS soon received a
list of every tie identified by the machine
vision algorithms, each tagged with a
unique GPS coordinate and milepost. The
condition of the tie is typically reported as
a number grade between 1 (good) and 4
(failed), which is determined by a multivariate model of tie condition based on the
variables a tie inspector would check.
A summary report determines the tie
grade distribution for each mile, so the
railroad is able to compare the defective
tie rate across its system to focus on
areas in higher need of tie replacement.
Additional reports that can be generated
include plate cut reports, component

reports, curve condition reports and
maintenance level reports that identify
the number of functional ties in a 39-foot
segment and other factors that can help
ensure Federal Railroad Administration
compliance. Customers are provided
access to all collected data on a GREXhosted web viewer, where they can select a
specific location to see 2-D and 3-D views
of the track, GIS map location, camera
views from the truck and graphs of various track measurements and conditions.
"When one considers the variables
between multiple inspectors grading ties
while simultaneously applying tie replacement logic, it is possible for inconsistencies
to arise. The GREX system benefited IAIS
by removing these variables and applying
a consistent tie grading process across the
entire system," said Lambi.
The automated tie grading system has
provided a more efficient distribution for
the IAIS tie program and subsequently
more efficient use of its tie capital. In
years past, it was typical to figure an

"average" tie count per mile. When marking ties manually, each inspector always
kept in mind this number and often
ended up marking an amount of ties not
far from the average. If the tie condition
across the railroad is already consistent,
this approach can work.
"However," said Lambi, "after running
the inspection vehicle, the variations in
tie conditions per mile were found to vary
significantly, and tie counts were adjusted
appropriately per mile based on actual
conditions. This approach also helps
identify clusters of defective ties that must
be addressed."
The results seen at IAIS show that
regional and short line railroads stand
to benefit from consistent, reliable
inspection data that allow for accurate
prioritization of capital spending. Recent
capital programs have included significant
crosstie investment, and incorporating
inspection technology into the planning
process will improve safety and allow for
the efficient allocation of resources. —

FALL 2016 // SHORT LINE CONNECTOR

25



Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of Short Line Connector - Fall 2016

No label
Short Line Connector - Fall 2016 - Cover1
Short Line Connector - Fall 2016 - Cover2
Short Line Connector - Fall 2016 - No label
Short Line Connector - Fall 2016 - 2
Short Line Connector - Fall 2016 - 3
Short Line Connector - Fall 2016 - 4
Short Line Connector - Fall 2016 - 5
Short Line Connector - Fall 2016 - 6
Short Line Connector - Fall 2016 - 7
Short Line Connector - Fall 2016 - 8
Short Line Connector - Fall 2016 - 9
Short Line Connector - Fall 2016 - 10
Short Line Connector - Fall 2016 - 11
Short Line Connector - Fall 2016 - 12
Short Line Connector - Fall 2016 - 13
Short Line Connector - Fall 2016 - 14
Short Line Connector - Fall 2016 - 15
Short Line Connector - Fall 2016 - 16
Short Line Connector - Fall 2016 - 17
Short Line Connector - Fall 2016 - 18
Short Line Connector - Fall 2016 - 19
Short Line Connector - Fall 2016 - 20
Short Line Connector - Fall 2016 - 21
Short Line Connector - Fall 2016 - 22
Short Line Connector - Fall 2016 - 23
Short Line Connector - Fall 2016 - 24
Short Line Connector - Fall 2016 - 25
Short Line Connector - Fall 2016 - 26
Short Line Connector - Fall 2016 - 27
Short Line Connector - Fall 2016 - 28
Short Line Connector - Fall 2016 - 29
Short Line Connector - Fall 2016 - 30
Short Line Connector - Fall 2016 - 31
Short Line Connector - Fall 2016 - 32
Short Line Connector - Fall 2016 - Cover3
Short Line Connector - Fall 2016 - Cover4
http://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ASLRRA/summer19
http://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ASLRRA/spring19
http://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ASLRRA/winter19
http://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ASLRRA/fall18
http://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ASLRRA/summer18
http://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ASLRRA/spring18
http://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ASLRRA/winter18
http://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ASLRRA/fall17
http://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ASLRRA/summer17
http://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ASLRRA/FactsAndFigures
http://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ASLRRA/spring17
http://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ASLRRA/winter17
http://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ASLRRA/fall16
http://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ASLRRA/summer16
http://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/ASLRRA/spring2016
http://www.nxtbookMEDIA.com