People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 10

6. What are the critical factors
for talent management?

From the viewpoint of the organization, early identification is the key. The
earlier you start the better the potential
outcome. Making a call on potential is
the keystone. There is general agreement potential includes a cognitive
component made up of foundation or
power (IQ) and what you do with it
(learning agility). How much you have
and how you use it. Those two factors,
plus diversity and variety of background
and experiences, leads to perspective
or seeing both the big picture (global)
and how things work. There is an EI/
EQ component because we are generally preparing high-potentials to
manage large numbers of people with
the three critical people skills being
listening, conflict management and
change management. The catch-22
is that many managers, especially at
the lower levels, are not very good at
assessing potential. There is defendable research based assessment tools
available, but most organizations will
not get into the messiness of "testing."
We created the annual people reviews
where the estimates of performance
and potential are discussed and
scrubbed. Confirmed or changed. A
by-product is education of the managers so that their estimates improve
over time. The best of all worlds would
be testing, expert support by HR
operatives (especially trained in the
science of TM and potential) and solid
estimates from managers. Once there
is consensus identification, the development process can be initiated.
From the viewpoint of the high
potential, self-awareness is the keystone.
The better you know yourself, the better
you can be. Since you can improve
anything, the earlier you know what you
are missing, the better the chance is
that you can enhance it before it causes
trouble. The piece of self-awareness
that is the most important is how others
see your attempts to influence. This
information informs your ability to be
a change master later in your career.
Since managers are notoriously hesitant
to give people candid timely actionable
critical feedback, we had to create 360
as a workaround. Not a perfect solution,
but adds to building self-awareness.
10

PEOPLE + STRATEGY

7. What does it take to
manage and lead to
prepare high-potentials?
Do we agree on the list?

There will never be a list because of
three findings. First, people do not lead
in the same way. There are many paths
to success. There are many combinations of skills and competencies that
could work. Second, the list varies
depending upon the nature of the
situation. Start-ups? Turnarounds? New
competition? Dying category? Domestic
or global? Scandals? Mergers and acquisitions? Different markets? And third,
from our work at Lominger, we found
that any senior role or job generally has
a list that has about 13 to 15 distinguishing skills or competencies. But what we
found was that an effective leader only
had to be exemplar (top 10%) on about
four to seven of the 13 to 15, so there
are multiple combinations of winning
competencies. Effective leaders used
the rest of the team or consultants to
fill in the remaining needed skills. To
do that well, you must be self-aware, be
aware of the skills and competencies of
the rest of the team and be willing to
delegate. Based on this same research,
we found that many high-potentials
don't have to enhance their missing
skills if they knew who else had them
and delegated those tasks to others.
Leaders don't have to be able to do
everything, they just need to make sure
everything is managed.

8. Should we tell people
they are high-potentials?

This is the one debate that has taken
up most of the debate time at conferences. This gets a little complex. If I
posted the annual list of high-potentials
in the company cafeteria, who am I
really informing? For the most part, the
people on the list, because they are consensus high-potentials, know they will
be on the list. You are really informing
those that are not on the list. We know
from surveys, that a large portion of the
employee population thinks they are
high-potentials and think they should
be on the list. You would confirm and
motivate a few and demotivate many.
Are your managers ready when the
unlisted employees come in and ask
why? And are the lists accurate? What

if the high potential list changes each
year? How can I be on the list one year
and not the next? Although I would
love radical transparency, I don't think
many companies could handle telling.

9. How do you develop
high-potentials?

This would shift somewhat based upon
the answer to the question "develop
them for what?" (question 2). We all
know the 70/20/10 meme. Not arguing
the accuracy of the numbers, people
learn best by doing. Since in most cases
we are preparing high-potentials for an
uncertain future, variety and diversity
of experiences works best. Given a more
certain list of required skills, perspectives and competencies, you can tailor
and shape the experiences to build
or enhance the projected skills of the
future. This is where learning agility fits
in. The higher the learning agility, the
more the candidate will be able to learn
from variety and diversity of experiences and exposures. A part of the definition of learning agility is being able
to do things well that you are doing for
the first time. A learning agile person
does this by combining the pieces and
parts of diverse past experiences into a
portfolio of skills for a first time task.

10. Can you develop potential?

Yes, you can. CCL's studies showed
about half of the participants demonstrated significant improvement in
learning agility (a stand in for potential) over a one day a month program
with homework assignments between
meetings. Someone with average potential could, if they are a motivated participant, improve their potential, certainly
as much as one standard deviation. It's
like teaching a class on creativity or
juggling or drawing. All participants say
they are not good at it and at the end
of the class some, maybe half are much
better than they thought or knew. Part
of potential is being open to learn and
change. Being excited about diversity
of experiences. Thinking in terms
of alternatives. Being inclusive and
listening. Those kinds of things can be
developed. We know learning agility
can be developed. We know EI/EQ can
be enhanced. We know perspective
can be built. We know problem solving



Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1

From The Executive Editor
From The Guest Editors
Perspectives
So You Want to Be a High-Potential?
How to Identify and Grow High Potentials: A CEO’s Perspective with Proven Results
Getting the Right People in the Hi-Po Pool
Wherefore Art Thou All Our Women High-Potentials?
Are Your HiPos Overrated?
Executive Roundtable
In First Person
Linking Theory + Practice
Insight into Action
Leadership Insights
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - Cover1
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - Cover2
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 1
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 2
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 3
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - From The Executive Editor
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - From The Guest Editors
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 6
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 7
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - Perspectives
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 9
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 10
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 11
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 12
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 13
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 14
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 15
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 16
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - So You Want to Be a High-Potential?
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 18
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 19
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 20
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 21
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - How to Identify and Grow High Potentials: A CEO’s Perspective with Proven Results
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 23
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 24
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 25
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 26
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 27
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - Getting the Right People in the Hi-Po Pool
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 29
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 30
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 31
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - Wherefore Art Thou All Our Women High-Potentials?
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 33
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 34
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 35
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 36
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 37
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - Are Your HiPos Overrated?
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 39
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 40
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 41
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - Executive Roundtable
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 43
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 44
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 45
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 46
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 47
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - In First Person
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 49
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - Linking Theory + Practice
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 51
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 52
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 53
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - Insight into Action
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 55
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - Leadership Insights
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 57
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 58
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - Cover3
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - Cover4
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