People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 12

identify high-potentials and adding
executive mindfulness training to our
high-potential curriculum.
Robert Eichinger, Ph.D., is the chief operating officer at TeamTelligent, LLC and senior director of Soutions at Matrix Insights.
He can be reached at robert.eichinger@
matrixinsights.com.

C O U N T E RP OINT:

The Art and
Science of Talent
Management:
Lessons Learned
By Michelle Weitzman-Garcia
Nature vs. nurture. Street smarts
vs. book smarts. Learning agility vs.
performance. EQ vs. IQ. Competencies. These topics and ideas have been
studied extensively and the fundamental
findings remain the same - people
are different because of who they are
(nature) and because of their environment (nurture). These differences
are normally distributed. People can
develop and change, especially when
they are motivated. People change the
most when they are challenged through
real-world tests/hardships/situations
(70/20/10 anyone?).
As talent management practitioners,
these immutable truths serve us well.
They provide the foundation for the
leadership development programs we
create, the talent review processes we
implement, the way we develop our
talent, and even the coaching work we
do. The underlying science is sound and
we can leverage that science to produce
consistent and reliable results.
The science matters in expert
cultures, but so does the "art." Having
worked in a variety of expert environments for the past 10 years, where
expertise is prized and your reputation
and credibility are dependent on how
well you know your craft, has taught me
that not only is the science important,
but it is the translation of the science
into meaningful concepts that really
12

PEOPLE + STRATEGY

makes the difference.
Below are some of the lessons I've
learned about working with and in
expert cultures.

Lesson 1: Words matter

What you call concepts matters. Learning agility. Career development. Feedback. Coaching. Try explaining learning
agility to a Ph.D. molecular biologist
without translating it into something
they can understand. It doesn't go well.
They hear it as HR speak. Translating
it into something that matters to them
(innovatively looking at molecules,
solving problems in a different way that
move the science forward, questioning
and challenging the status quo) is how
you get their attention. Words matter.

Lesson 2: Flexibility is key

A thorough understanding of the
science can allow for significant flexibility in the way we practice our craft.
It can allow us to design processes and
approaches to talent management that
meet our organizations, managers, and
employees where they are while still
retaining the underlying truths. Different performance management and
talent review processes can all work, even
within the same organization, if they are
based on the science.

Lesson 3: Experts are more
adaptable than you might think
I have been amazed at how quickly some
experts pick up on these concepts even
when the concept is not intuitive. Taking
the time to educate them and help them
understand the concepts, sometimes on
a case by case basis, is the way to change
their thinking. Convert an expert and
you will have one of the best advocates
you could ever hope for.
The work done by practitioners and
researchers such as Bob Eichinger have
created a strong foundation on which
talent management practitioners can
base their practice. Taking the time to
understand the science allows us to creatively bring talent management to life
within the organizations we serve.
Michelle Weitzman-Garcia, Ph.D., is
executive director of workforce development at Regeneron. She can be reached at
mwg@regeneron.com.

Breaking the
Non-Diverse
Leadership Cycle
By Kelly Joscelyne
I am drawn to point #5 in this refreshingly direct and informative piece: "Are
men and women different (when it
comes to potential)?" I don't disagree
with Robert's response that this is a
potentially thorny question, one that
could keep biologists, psychologists,
sociologists, statisticians, and the HR
community busy for some time. However,
I don't believe it is the right question for
today's corporate talent management
community. The more pressing question
is, "why do women and other diverse
talent lose out in our talent identification processes today and so infrequently
reach top leadership ranks?"
Using Robert's definitions of potential, do women and other diverse
talent have the same potential as men to
"manage people managing processes in
complex changing conditions?" Do they
have the same potential for "innovation,
product and service creation, technical
advances, and deep individual excellence?" Do they have the same potential
for being an "agile strategist, people
manager, and leader during times of
change?" The answer to these questions
is a resounding "Yes!"
Even if there are fundamental differences in women and men that could
relate to how we think about potential
in the corporate world, the differences
probably fall somewhere in the fractional percentages of differentiation referenced in point #2: nature vs. nurture. As
with most complex topics the answer to
this question is likely somewhere along
the lines of: "it depends." It depends
on the complex interplay of gender,
culture, geography, corporate environment, professional experience, and
many other factors.
When it comes to individual potential decisions in the hands of corporate
line managers, these are not the right
questions to ask. Rather than focusing on the marginal impact of innate,
gender-based factors, the energies of the



Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1

From The Executive Editor
From The Guest Editors
Perspectives
So You Want to Be a High-Potential?
How to Identify and Grow High Potentials: A CEO’s Perspective with Proven Results
Getting the Right People in the Hi-Po Pool
Wherefore Art Thou All Our Women High-Potentials?
Are Your HiPos Overrated?
Executive Roundtable
In First Person
Linking Theory + Practice
Insight into Action
Leadership Insights
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - Cover1
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - Cover2
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 1
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 2
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 3
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - From The Executive Editor
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - From The Guest Editors
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 6
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 7
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - Perspectives
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 9
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 10
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 11
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 12
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 13
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 14
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 15
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 16
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - So You Want to Be a High-Potential?
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 18
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 19
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 20
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 21
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - How to Identify and Grow High Potentials: A CEO’s Perspective with Proven Results
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 23
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 24
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 25
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 26
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 27
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - Getting the Right People in the Hi-Po Pool
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 29
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 30
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 31
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - Wherefore Art Thou All Our Women High-Potentials?
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 33
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 34
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 35
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 36
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 37
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - Are Your HiPos Overrated?
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 39
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 40
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 41
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - Executive Roundtable
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 43
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 44
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 45
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 46
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 47
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - In First Person
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 49
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - Linking Theory + Practice
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 51
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 52
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 53
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - Insight into Action
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 55
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - Leadership Insights
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 57
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 58
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - Cover3
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - Cover4
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