People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 16

prompted to focus on setting their team
members up to succeed.
Mary-Clare Race, Ph.D., is the chief
creative officer at Mind Gym. She can be
reached at mary-clare.race@themindgym.
com.

Why Talent
Management is
Missing its Target
recognized is proportionate and based
on objective, performance-related
criteria.
One of the largest predictors of satisfaction is social comparison: employees
who look around them and perceive
they aren't being recognized fairly don't
perform as well.

Choice

We support the emergence of HiPo
when we:
Create support networks. Building a
strong network of technical, emotional
and practical support.
Adopt an optimistic outlook.
Interpreting challenges as short-term,
specific and insightful.
Focus on what's in our control.
Drawing on inner strength and grit to
maintain effort and interest over time to
sustain performance despite setbacks.
Considering where it's possible to
give people autonomy and ownership
to maximize their choices is critical.
Managers of HiPos should be open with
their teams, sharing mistakes, risks,
successes, challenges and opportunities
and encouraging learning from all of
these areas.
Finally, a note on who should be
responsible. In the traditional world of
talent management, primary responsibility lies with the line manager and
HR is the chief enforcer of the process.
To ensure these six conditions are truly
present the HiPo employee must play
a far more active part. Manager and
employee both have a role to play and
they can succeed only by acting in unison. This gives high-potential employees
much greater license to influence their
chances of success, while managers are
16

PEOPLE + STRATEGY

By Claudio Garcia
Once I was in a meeting with a newly
hired HR leader from a large private
company who was held accountable
for implementing talent management
practices in her organization. Looking
for trusted advice, she invited to the
meeting some of her partner suppliers
to discuss a new process to identify and
develop high-potential talent in the
organization.
She shared with us what seemed to
be a fairly basic approach to the topic. A
third person in the room, a consultant,
upon realizing this, began questioning
the approach and talking how sophisticated high-potential management had
become, recommending what the HR
leader needs to do. Before the consultant finished laying out his recommendations, the HR leader interrupted him to
say that he was missing the mark because
her goal was not to initiate a complex
system, but to create a framework where
executives could effectively begin "learning to think, understand and talk about
talents, their impact on the future of
the company." A more complex process
could prevent her from achieving the
goal, at least at that initial stage.
For me, this situation showed how
many times our initial intentions get
derailed. In order to ensure good talent
management practices, organizations
have become saturated with HR planning, compensation, recruitment, development, performance and assessment
practices; all of them competing with
many other administrative, legal, and
finance tasks in increasingly lean and
flat organizations. Executives, unable
to distinguish HR activities from other

demands on their time, often treat HR
as cumbersome and counterproductive
compliance duties. The bottom line is,
talent management practices were not
thought out from their end user perspective. As a result, leaders trust their
own biased beliefs in managing talent,
to the exclusion of the compelling available science and proven practices that
could help them be more effective.
Organizations will never leverage
talent management to their full potential if they do not accept the need to
change taking into consideration the
managers of talent themselves. Different
from the objectivity of routines related to administrative, financial, legal
and other corporate activities, talent
management practices often navigate
through subjective concepts. Those
practices should help leaders broaden
their people management worldview or
as the HR leader said above, develop
them to think, understand and talk
more accurately about talent.
The talent management situation today is even more delicate. The advent of
new technologies (which have increased
the automation of routine tasks), new
business models, the adoption of innovation as a business imperative and new
collaborative management practices (as
agile management) calls for the increased demand for so called soft-skills.
What that means is that working in organizations is increasingly becoming more
tacit and relationship-based, demanding
greater ability of leaders to deal with the
people side of the business. Talent management practices as they exist today
simply do not meet the need for flexible
and adaptive application.
When I speak to HR executives, most
say that all those tools they provide are
there to enable leaders to better manage
their organizations' talent. The sad fact
is that it is not happening.
HR needs to rely less on the technocratic solutions and must retool
themselves with smart and intuitive
management practices for leaders so
they can effectively nurture high potential talents.
Claudio Garcia, is the executive vicepresident of strategy and corporate development at Lee Hecht Harrison. He can
be reached at claudio.garcia@lhh.com.



Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1

From The Executive Editor
From The Guest Editors
Perspectives
So You Want to Be a High-Potential?
How to Identify and Grow High Potentials: A CEO’s Perspective with Proven Results
Getting the Right People in the Hi-Po Pool
Wherefore Art Thou All Our Women High-Potentials?
Are Your HiPos Overrated?
Executive Roundtable
In First Person
Linking Theory + Practice
Insight into Action
Leadership Insights
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - Cover1
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - Cover2
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 1
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 2
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 3
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - From The Executive Editor
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - From The Guest Editors
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 6
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 7
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - Perspectives
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 9
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 10
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 11
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 12
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 13
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 14
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 15
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 16
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - So You Want to Be a High-Potential?
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 18
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 19
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 20
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 21
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - How to Identify and Grow High Potentials: A CEO’s Perspective with Proven Results
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 23
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 24
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 25
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 26
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 27
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - Getting the Right People in the Hi-Po Pool
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 29
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 30
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 31
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - Wherefore Art Thou All Our Women High-Potentials?
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 33
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 34
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 35
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 36
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 37
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - Are Your HiPos Overrated?
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 39
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 40
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 41
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - Executive Roundtable
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 43
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 44
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 45
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 46
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 47
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - In First Person
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 49
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - Linking Theory + Practice
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 51
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 52
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 53
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - Insight into Action
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 55
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - Leadership Insights
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 57
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 58
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - Cover3
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - Cover4
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