People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 24

Identifying Derailment Factors and
Lessening Their Impact on Leaders

FIGURE 3: RELATIONSHIP OF ORGANIZATIONAL AGILITY MODEL
AND LEARNING AGILITY MODEL

There are many types of derailment factors. We focused on two areas of growing
Strategically Agile
Cognitive Perspective
agility and self-awareness to prevent derailCapability Building of Talent
Interpersonal Acumen
ment. Earlier researchers from the Center
of Creative Leadership in the field of
Organizational Design and Decisions
Drive to Excel
learning agility discovered that the derailReadiness of an Agile Culture
Change Alacrity
ment of leaders was due to their inability
Execution of Strategy
Drive to Excel
or lack of willingness to change and adapt
their behaviors.12
Plus Coaching and Continuous
Feedback Responsiveness and
Feedback process
Environmental Mindfulness
We also turned to the Hogan Developlearning agility factors
ment (Derailer) Survey, which identifies
factors that predict derailment and potential career stalls. All participants were proused to identify potential new innovation products for the
vided with feedback from certified coaches on all three Hogan
companies as well as the traditional Competitive Strategy
leadership reports and decision styles. This was done on mulmethods were taught; innovative Design Thinking methtiple occasions to gain insight through continuous feedback
ods were learned using a change simulation.
and to heighten awareness of their traits and derailers. Lack
* Capability Building of Talent: General manager high perforof self-awareness is one of the major derailment factors.13
mance simulation with participants taking on a different
functional leader role, cross functional teams to build
relationships across companies.
Results of the Program
* Organizational Design and Decisions: Scenario planning
* HR Orchestrator: The CHRO played a key role in idenusing real product lines and custom cases.
tifying and coaching leaders throughout the program
* Readiness of an Agile Culture: Comprehensive culture survey
to implement the tools and find developmental roles for
that predicts financial performance. Used as a multiyear
those who needed the next growth opportunity.
growth metric with cascading action plans on organiza* Agility Focused: Agility concepts were built into the detional agility areas to reinforce culture to support strategy.
sign of the program to grow leadership and organizational
* Execution of Strategy: Strategic execution simulation and
agility.
custom new product strategic execution case and tools.
* Metrics: Outcomes were measured behaviorally and
quantitatively through promotions and performance
evaluations.
Leading Edge Future-Focused and Agile Content and Faculty
* Multiple Assessments: Rather than relying on one meaWe identified experts from a variety of academic and consure, we used a comprehensive suite of leading edge, highsulting areas to utilize high impact content and tools to
ly researched assessments that drove readiness, selection,
accelerate leadership agility. Each of the week-long executive
coaching areas of focus, competencies and outcomes.
education programs and development coaching programs
were designed to engage senior leaders.
Organizational Agility SCORE Model

Learning Agility Model for Leaders

Multiple Results
Relationship of Organizational Agility Model and
Learning Agility
Additionally, we found it helpful to map the organizational
agility framework with the learning agility factors to ensure
growth in related areas to maintain momentum for development and to prevent career stalls.

What is the unique focus of the
coaching and feedback approach?

Results and the outcomes measured at the end of the multiyear initiative were impressive and justified the effort and
investment. Other indicators of success were also positive.
Several participants received significant promotions during
the process and others took on additional responsibilities.
Moreover, the number of participants rated as "ready now"
increased during the talent management process. Consequently, each Huber division was strengthened by the benefits these leaders received from the program and the overall
organizational culture became more unified and directional.

Avoiding Leadership Failure
Researchers have estimated that 50% of managers fail for a
variety of reasons.10 Regardless of the reasons given, executive failure has a high cost. One author estimated that the
price of a derailed executive can be as high as $2.7 million.11
Furthermore, it can be very expensive to go outside of the
organization to hire people for key high-level jobs. We realized
that if the J. M. Huber Company grew talent from inside and
reinforced the company culture and practices, large benefits
would result.
24

PEOPLE + STRATEGY

Overall positive results of the program include:

* Pre-/post-learning agility scores with increases showing
significant growth to identify those most ready to be promoted or given developmental assignments.
* Pre-/post-decision styles growth in flexibility and integrative leadership and creative integrative thinking strategic
styles, which are the key indicators for continued leadership success.
* Talent data: Promotions, expanded job responsibilities,



Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1

From The Executive Editor
From The Guest Editors
Perspectives
So You Want to Be a High-Potential?
How to Identify and Grow High Potentials: A CEO’s Perspective with Proven Results
Getting the Right People in the Hi-Po Pool
Wherefore Art Thou All Our Women High-Potentials?
Are Your HiPos Overrated?
Executive Roundtable
In First Person
Linking Theory + Practice
Insight into Action
Leadership Insights
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - Cover1
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - Cover2
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 1
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 2
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 3
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - From The Executive Editor
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - From The Guest Editors
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 6
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 7
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - Perspectives
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 9
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 10
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 11
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 12
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 13
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 14
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 15
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 16
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - So You Want to Be a High-Potential?
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 18
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 19
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 20
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 21
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - How to Identify and Grow High Potentials: A CEO’s Perspective with Proven Results
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 23
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 24
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 25
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 26
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 27
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - Getting the Right People in the Hi-Po Pool
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 29
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 30
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 31
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - Wherefore Art Thou All Our Women High-Potentials?
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 33
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 34
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 35
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 36
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 37
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - Are Your HiPos Overrated?
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 39
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 40
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 41
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - Executive Roundtable
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 43
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 44
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 45
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 46
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 47
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - In First Person
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 49
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - Linking Theory + Practice
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 51
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 52
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 53
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - Insight into Action
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 55
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - Leadership Insights
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 57
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 58
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - Cover3
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - Cover4
http://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/HRPS/hrps_41_3_2018
http://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/HRPS/hrps_41_2_2018
http://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/HRPS/hrps_41_1_2018
http://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/HRPS/hrps_40_4_2017
http://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/HRPS/hrps_40_3_2017
http://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/HRPS/hrps_40_2_2017
http://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/HRPS/hrps_40_1_2017
http://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/HRPS/hrps_39_4_2016
http://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/HRPS/hrps_39_3_2016
http://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/HRPS/hrps_39_2_2016
http://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/HRPS/hrps_39_1_2016
http://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/HRPS/hrps_38_4_2015
http://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/HRPS/d52272_hrps_summer2015
http://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/HRPS/d49675_hrps_spring2015
http://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/HRPS/d47867_hrps_winter2015
http://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/HRPS/hrps_fall2014_teaser
http://www.nxtbookMEDIA.com