People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 36

will be established in that context, i.e., there is a problem with
the high-potential to be solved. The better approach is to focus
on enhancing an individual's effectiveness overall.

Call to Action:

* Determine to what extent external coaching is used in conjunction with key developmental experiences.
* Apply coaching and key challenging experiences in tandem
to enable high-potentials to engage in reflection to capture
key learnings from these challenges.
* Ensure the positioning of all coaching interventions is done
in a positive development context (unless the situation is
truly a remedial one).
* Track progress and outcomes for high-potential women and
replace coaches that are less effective at achieving results.

Summary

Gender inclusiveness is defined as the way an organization
configures its systems and structures to value and leverage
the potential, and to limit the disadvantages, of differences
(Roberson, 2006). This applies to all employees whether they
are high-potentials or not. What may be done to imbue gender
inclusiveness in organizational systems, structures, and culture?
How do we ensure talent management systems are identifying
and moving women into the most senior roles? What are the
research-based factors and best practices that must be considered to improve assessment and development for high-potential women? Although senior leaders have been grappling with
these strategic questions as well as tactical ways to improve the
numbers of women moving through the leadership pipeline,
it is clear that the relative numbers of female leaders from
mid-level to the top of organizations make gender inclusiveness an elusive goal.
There is a wide range of resources, programs, and policies
that CEOs and CHROs may utilize to support the advancement
of women in their organizations. Recent research evidence
reveals the hidden pitfalls and problems in the way many talent
management programs are currently implemented. However,
more careful attention and tracking of such programs can
help to avoid these dangers that often inadvertently discourage
or reduce the numbers of talented women moving through
the leadership pipeline. Programs involving assessment and
development are particularly impactful opportunities for the
development of high-potential women. Because many high-potential women can benefit from feedback-rich environments,
most will welcome opportunities that provide honest, realistic
feedback about their performance. The implementation of
practices such as mentoring, 360-degree feedback, executive
coaching, and personal feedback from bosses and peers can
help women gain a better perspective on their strengths and
challenge areas (Valerio, 2009). High-potential women also
need to be given the key challenging assignments that enable
them to develop as leaders who move through the leadership
pipeline toward top management roles.
Anna Marie Valerio, Ph.D.is an executive coach, president of Executive Leadership Strategies, and the author of two books, Developing
Women Leaders: A Guide for Men and Women in Organizations and Execu36

PEOPLE + STRATEGY

tive Coaching: A Guide for the HR Professional (co-authored with Robert
J. Lee.). She has more than 20 years of management and consulting
experience in a variety of organizations and with Fortune 500 clients.
She can be reached at www.executiveleadershipstrategies.com.

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Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1

From The Executive Editor
From The Guest Editors
Perspectives
So You Want to Be a High-Potential?
How to Identify and Grow High Potentials: A CEO’s Perspective with Proven Results
Getting the Right People in the Hi-Po Pool
Wherefore Art Thou All Our Women High-Potentials?
Are Your HiPos Overrated?
Executive Roundtable
In First Person
Linking Theory + Practice
Insight into Action
Leadership Insights
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - Cover1
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - Cover2
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 1
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 2
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 3
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - From The Executive Editor
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - From The Guest Editors
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 6
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 7
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - Perspectives
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 9
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 10
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People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 14
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 15
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 16
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - So You Want to Be a High-Potential?
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People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 19
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 20
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 21
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - How to Identify and Grow High Potentials: A CEO’s Perspective with Proven Results
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 23
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 24
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 25
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 26
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 27
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - Getting the Right People in the Hi-Po Pool
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 29
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 30
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 31
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - Wherefore Art Thou All Our Women High-Potentials?
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 33
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People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 35
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 36
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 37
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - Are Your HiPos Overrated?
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 39
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 40
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 41
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - Executive Roundtable
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 43
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 44
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 45
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 46
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 47
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - In First Person
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 49
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - Linking Theory + Practice
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 51
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 52
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 53
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - Insight into Action
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 55
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - Leadership Insights
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 57
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 58
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - Cover3
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - Cover4
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