People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 55

help leaders adapt, stay ahead, and even
create the future. Allan Church and
Jay Conger suggest a compelling set of
X-factors; Lewis Garrad speculates that
future executives have to be even better
as problem finders than problem solvers, reframing and shaping the issues
that matter most.
David Dotlich reminds us that no
matter how far robotics and AI change
the configuration of work, jobs and what
needs oversight, we will still require
leadership that embodies moral perspective, emotional intelligence, and the
capacity to inspire others for common
purpose. These may become even more
significant to compete effectively in any
industry.
Can you imagine future leadership
that is fundamentally different in some
respects, yet similar in others? In this
spirit, I encourage you to get hold of
futurist Bob Johansen's description
of 10 leadership skills for the future
(including smart mob organizing to
act quickly; dilemma flipping to see the
world differently; constructive depolarizing to calm tensions and foster positive
engagement). See if your high-potentials have and can foster these skills in
others across the business.1

We can be more rigorous in assessing
potential and resist the tendency to be
so 'nice' about it. Many readers know
all too well how annual performance
calibration suffers from terminal niceness, where everyone is above average
regardless of business performance.
This approach simply doesn't advance
efforts to maximize potential. Even if

real development takes time. Marilyn
Buckner and Mike Marberry show just
what can happen over several years.
Marberry, in particular, highlights that
the CEO's role should be more than
just speaking at a kickoff event. They
encourage us to combine measurement,
feedback and opportunities for people
to reflect on their performance and

More rigorous selection of the high potential pool
will allow for better leverage of resources, time and
energy that can be applied to development.
you believe you have a great bench of
talent, force your nine-box to have a real
distribution, where no more than onethird of the pool can be rated highest
potential or highest performance, and
see how that shapes your discussions.
Other authors remind us that intuition
is a poor substitute for validated measures. More rigorous selection of the
high potential pool will allow for better
leverage of resources, time and energy
that can be applied to development.
Audit your current profile of leaders
and specify what you want the future to
look like. Anna Marie Valerio makes a
compelling argument to audit gender inclusiveness, and follow up with
appropriate development tactics. The
same might be said of every critical
Employee Resource Group. I am also
impressed that several authors call for
expanding the involvement of different
stakeholders to enhance development.
Brad Winn, for example, illustrates ways
to involve the board in development
of CEO candidates. Others remind
us that employees and customers are
key stakeholders of the firm and that
measures of employee engagement and
customer satisfaction should be part of
ongoing assessment of the progress of
any high-potential leader.
It's not a quick fix. While many
programs to develop potential are organized around discrete chunks of time
(e.g., the six- or 12-month program),

results as a way to drive improvement
over time. They also advocate we actively
integrate what works with high-potentials back into broader company talent
management. Don't keep your leadership insights bottled up for only a select
group of leaders.
Demystify what is means to be and to
be seen as a high potential. Church and
colleagues have made compelling arguments, with data, to increase transparency of what matters, and provide feedback
on the level of perceived potential. Be
clear what type of leadership you look
for and what you don't want to see, also
noting early warning signs and outright
derailers. Garrad points to the dilemma
of ambition - you need enough to
want to stand out, but not so much that
it leads to dysfunctional behavior you
cannot monitor and control. Open discussions can increase alignment around
desired leadership behaviors, while
raising engagement and performance
among those who aspire to lead. Take
the time to consider, as Church and
Conger do, what being high potential
looks and feels like, and make this the
topic of an open discussion.
Throughout this issue there is great
advice that draws from research, practice and reflection. As you reach back
through the contributions, make them
your own, and tailor these best practices
to the organizations where you seek to
maximize potential.

1 Johansen, Bob. Leaders make the future: Ten new leadership skills for an uncertain world. 2012. Berret-Koehler.

VOLUME 41 | ISSUE 1 | WINTER 2018

55



Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1

From The Executive Editor
From The Guest Editors
Perspectives
So You Want to Be a High-Potential?
How to Identify and Grow High Potentials: A CEO’s Perspective with Proven Results
Getting the Right People in the Hi-Po Pool
Wherefore Art Thou All Our Women High-Potentials?
Are Your HiPos Overrated?
Executive Roundtable
In First Person
Linking Theory + Practice
Insight into Action
Leadership Insights
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - Cover1
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - Cover2
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 1
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 2
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 3
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - From The Executive Editor
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - From The Guest Editors
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 6
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 7
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - Perspectives
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 9
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 10
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 11
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 12
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 13
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 14
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 15
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 16
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - So You Want to Be a High-Potential?
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 18
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 19
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 20
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 21
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - How to Identify and Grow High Potentials: A CEO’s Perspective with Proven Results
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 23
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 24
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 25
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 26
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 27
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - Getting the Right People in the Hi-Po Pool
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 29
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 30
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 31
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - Wherefore Art Thou All Our Women High-Potentials?
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 33
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 34
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 35
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 36
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 37
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - Are Your HiPos Overrated?
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 39
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 40
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 41
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - Executive Roundtable
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 43
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 44
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 45
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 46
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 47
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - In First Person
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 49
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - Linking Theory + Practice
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 51
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 52
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 53
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - Insight into Action
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 55
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - Leadership Insights
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 57
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - 58
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - Cover3
People & Strategy Winter 2018 Vol. 41 No. 1 - Cover4
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