People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 10

hierarchies, simplifying communications channels, and allowing ground
commanders significantly more
decision-making latitude.
* Teams allow firms to remove expensive layers of management and
controls. Although there are risks in
such an approach, firms will always
be interested in cutting costs and
seeking efficiencies.
* Less hierarchy, greater flexibility,
and more autonomy are exactly what
the rising generations of workers are
looking for. Teams suit a more relaxed and informal approach that is
the antithesis of the rigid, controlled
nature of the production line, and
research indicates millennials prefer
team-working.7
The science of creating and sustaining high performance teams is well
understood8 and isn't rocket science. I
characterize it in terms of three simple
design rules: the hard, the soft, and the
deep.
Hard design rules concern getting
the structures that support teams
right and ensuring the team's mission,
resources and capabilities are set up
right, and roles are clear. Gordon Curphy's Rocket Model provides a sound
foundation.9
Soft design rules refer to what we
often think of as building the team.
Psychological safety, cohesion, communication, and dealing with conflict
are long established constructs with
known positive benefits for teamwork.
The issue is that many leaders are
insufficiently professional to value such
time and investment to get right. It is
inconceivable that an elite athletic team
would ignore its culture and emotional
tone, yet too frequently the soft stuff is
seen as irrelevant. Ignore team culture
at your peril.
Finally, there is the third design rule,
which I refer to as the deep: We now
know that the mix of personalities on a
team makes a huge difference to how it
shows up and performs.10 Modern tools
help provide an insight to the dynamics
of a team, even before it is assembled,
ensuring diversity of thinking, style and
psychological role can be created from
the get-go. The value of teams who work
well together is being revealed by shifts
in hiring practices; it is increasingly
10

PEOPLE + STRATEGY

common in the tech industry to recruit
a whole team, not just the leader or a
star coder.
The shift towards defining talent in
terms of teams has profound implications for how we run our companies.
How well does your organization do
teams now, and how prepared are your
leaders, practices, and supporting structures for the coming changes in the
world of work? If we are to build more
rewarding and more productive organizations, teams will become the essential
tool that HR leaders reach for first.
Dave Winsborough is Director of Innovation at Winsborough Limited, New Zealand. He can be reached at dave@winsborough.co.nz.

References
Furnham, A. "Money as a motivator," in
Management Mumbo-Jumbo: A Skeptics' Dictionary. (London: Palgrave Macmillan UK,
2006), 92-94
1

Bär, M., Kempf, A., and Ruenzi, S. "Team
Management and Mutual Funds." German
Research 5, no. 48 (2005).
2

3
Patel, S., & Sarkissian, S. "To Group or Not
to Group? Evidence from Mutual Fund Databases." Journal of Financial and Quantitative
Analysis 52, no. 5 (2017): 1989-2021.

Swaab, R. I., Schaerer, M., Anicich, E. M.,
Ronay, R., & Galinsky, A. D. "The TooMuch-Talent Effect: Team Interdependence
Determines When More Talent Is Too
Much or Not Enough." Psychological Science
25, no. 8 (2014): 1581-1591.
4

5
Winsborough, D. Fusion: The Psychology of
Teams. Tulsa, OK: Hogan Press, 2017.
6
McChrystal, S., Collins, T., Silverman,
D., & Fussel, C. Team of Teams: New Rules of
Engagement for a Complex World. New York:
Penguin, 2015.
7
Myers, K. K., & Sadaghiani, K. "Millennials in the workplace: A communication
perspective on millennials' organizational
relationships and performance." Journal
of Business and Psychology 25, no. 2 (2010):
225-238.
8
Shuffler, M. L., DiazGranados, D., & Salas,
E. "There's a Science for That: Team Development Interventions in Organizations."
Current Directions in Psychological Science 20,
no. 6 (2011): 365-372.

9
Curphy, G., & Hogan, R. T. The Rocket
Model: Practical Advice for Building High
Performing Teams. Tulsa, OK. Hogan Assessment Systems, 2012.

Winsborough, D., & Chamorro-Premuzic,
T. "Great Teams are about personalities,
not just skills." Harvard Business Review,
January 25, 2017.

10

COUNT E RPO IN T

The Rise of Teams:
A Gradual Ascent
Up a Steep Slope
By Rob Morris

M

oving from a Tayloristic,
efficiency-based model to a
flat and more collaborative
design is easy enough to understand
in theory. But to accomplish this in
practice requires mature businesses to
change some fundamental beliefs and
practices that, most likely, have served
them well in the past. This is the work
that will require time, discipline, and
leadership. While some companies are
attempting to make this shift, many
lack the mindset and sufficient levels of
strong leadership to capitalize on those
changes. Leaders' influence and team
development skills are simply underemphasized and underdeveloped for these
complex, networked structures.
To begin with, a "network of teams"
model increases the number of connections between individuals and groups
and emphasizes interpersonal and
inter-group relations. This requires skills
like boundary spanning and a wide
range of influence strategies to align
resources and build trust with more
people. While operating in a team with
high trust can be quite satisfying, unfortunately it is not the norm.
Most leaders (80 percent) we surveyed report they have been on fewer
than five high performing teams over
a 20-year career. When describing the
best and worst teams they've been on,
leaders identify two factors as defining
whether a team is high performing or
not: trust and respect (47 percent) and
clear focus and purpose (30 percent).



Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2

From the Executive Editor
From the Guest Editor
Perspectives
Ignition Teams: Rising to the Challenges of Innovation
Challenge Accepted: Managing Polarities to Enhance Virtual Team Effectiveness
Facilitating Trust and Communication in Virtual Teams
Building Entrepreneurial Teams: Talent, Social Capital, and Culture
Organizations That Get Teamwork Right
Team Development: The Power of Debriefing
The Rise of Digital Team Building
Executive Roundtable
In First Person
Linking Theory + Practice
Insight into Action
Leadership Insights
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - Cover1
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - Cover2
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 1
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 2
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 3
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - From the Executive Editor
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 5
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - From the Guest Editor
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 7
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - Perspectives
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 9
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 10
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 11
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 12
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 13
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 14
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 15
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - Ignition Teams: Rising to the Challenges of Innovation
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 17
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 18
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 19
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 20
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 21
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - Challenge Accepted: Managing Polarities to Enhance Virtual Team Effectiveness
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 23
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 24
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 25
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 26
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 27
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 28
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 29
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - Facilitating Trust and Communication in Virtual Teams
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 31
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 32
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 33
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 34
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 35
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - Building Entrepreneurial Teams: Talent, Social Capital, and Culture
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 37
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 38
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 39
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 40
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 41
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - Organizations That Get Teamwork Right
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 43
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 44
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 45
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - Team Development: The Power of Debriefing
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 47
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 48
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 49
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 50
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 51
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - The Rise of Digital Team Building
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 53
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 54
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 55
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - Executive Roundtable
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 57
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 58
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 59
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 60
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 61
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - In First Person
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 63
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 64
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 65
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - Linking Theory + Practice
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 67
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 68
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 69
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - Insight into Action
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 71
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - Leadership Insights
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 73
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 74
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - Cover3
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - Cover4
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