People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 11

These conditions are fundamental to
a "team of teams" approach, and the
frequency with which leaders are developing these conditions today is too low
for most companies to consider it as a
viable operating model.
One reason for this is that leaders are
selected and promoted more for their
technical skills and ability to deliver
results than they are for softer skills, like
self-awareness and range of influence
(See Figure 1). Most companies would
say they want both, and I would agree.
But what is the right prioritization of
these skills for an operating model that
requires more relationships and high
trust?
Through our leadership profiling
practice, we have found that 25 percent of senior leaders fall below the
leadership benchmark for their level.
Some executive teams have as many
as 45 percent of their leaders who do
not meet baseline levels of leadership
competence. The data indicate that organizations value delivering results and
"hard" skills like strategic thinking above
influence at every level of leadership.
To mitigate the risk of adopting a
model that leaders cannot deliver, organizations must prioritize the development and reinforcement of leadership
influence skills, including developing
self-awareness and a broader set of
influence strategies. In a team-based
model, companies also need to evolve
from selecting leaders primarily based
on individual role profiles towards using
these in conjunction with an equally
well-developed team profile.
For this to work, companies must
continuously evaluate the team capability and performance against business
needs and team objectives. It will be
necessary to develop team competencies, such as the ability to regenerate,
i.e., transition members on and off the
team without losing focus, momentum,
or the critical trust and respect required
of a high-performing team.
The rise of teams is an easy argument
to follow, and we have a few examples
where organizations have benefitted
from making the shift. Those considering this approach should expect more
of a steady climb than a rapid ascent
as there are deeply embedded norms,
leadership skills gaps, and organization-

Figure 1: Leadership Capability Benchmarks

al capabilities that much be addressed
for this to work.
Rob Morris, Ph.D., is global head of innovation at YSC Consulting, New York, NY. He
can be reached at rbm2123@gmail.com.

C OUNT E RPOINT

The Next Generation
of Teamwork
By Peter Neville

D

oes the emerging concept of
"team" mean a fundamental
shift, a paradigm change-or
is it simply a rehash of something
we haven't discussed for a while and
therefore, just dusting off, repackaging, and commercializing the old?
Maybe teamwork, much like artificial intelligence, has reached a level
of importance and inevitability that
requires us to sit up and pay serious
attention to the implications, values, and necessary actions required

to make full use of its inherent
potential?
Almost 9 out of 10 companies surveyed for a 2013 Ernst & Young report
agreed that the problems confronting
them were so complex that teams were
becoming essential to provide effective
solutions.1 A recurring CB Insights
post-mortem study shows that close to
one in four of all start-up failures are
due to "not having the right team," making it number three on the list (behind
running out of funds and being unable
to identify a market need).2 However,
when adding items such as "burn-out,"
"failure to pivot," "lacking passion," and
"disharmony on team," you quickly get
to a great deal more than one in four.
Adding insights from Lancaster University3 and Inc.,4 you quickly arrive at a
heightened state of awareness: There is
something rotten in the state of teams.
Fragmentation, isolation, insufficient understanding of each other as team members, lack of accountability-all point to
a whopping team vitamin deficiency that
results in a massive loss of opportunities.
The inability to capitalize on differences,
create the driving force that is commitVOLUME 41 | ISSUE 2 | SPRING 2018

11



Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2

From the Executive Editor
From the Guest Editor
Perspectives
Ignition Teams: Rising to the Challenges of Innovation
Challenge Accepted: Managing Polarities to Enhance Virtual Team Effectiveness
Facilitating Trust and Communication in Virtual Teams
Building Entrepreneurial Teams: Talent, Social Capital, and Culture
Organizations That Get Teamwork Right
Team Development: The Power of Debriefing
The Rise of Digital Team Building
Executive Roundtable
In First Person
Linking Theory + Practice
Insight into Action
Leadership Insights
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - Cover1
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - Cover2
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 1
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 2
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 3
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - From the Executive Editor
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 5
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - From the Guest Editor
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 7
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - Perspectives
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 9
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 10
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 11
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 12
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 13
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 14
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 15
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - Ignition Teams: Rising to the Challenges of Innovation
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 17
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 18
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 19
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 20
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 21
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - Challenge Accepted: Managing Polarities to Enhance Virtual Team Effectiveness
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 23
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 24
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 25
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 26
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 27
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 28
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 29
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - Facilitating Trust and Communication in Virtual Teams
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 31
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 32
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 33
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 34
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 35
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - Building Entrepreneurial Teams: Talent, Social Capital, and Culture
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 37
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 38
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 39
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 40
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 41
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - Organizations That Get Teamwork Right
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 43
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 44
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 45
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - Team Development: The Power of Debriefing
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 47
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 48
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 49
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 50
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 51
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - The Rise of Digital Team Building
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 53
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 54
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 55
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - Executive Roundtable
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 57
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 58
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 59
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 60
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 61
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - In First Person
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 63
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 64
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 65
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - Linking Theory + Practice
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 67
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 68
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 69
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - Insight into Action
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 71
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - Leadership Insights
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 73
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 74
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - Cover3
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - Cover4
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