People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 13

teams, when functioning at their best,
represent an augmented version of our
individual selves.
Peter Neville, MSc, is partner and founder of TEAMSTOWORK, Copenhagen,
Denmark. He can be reached at peter@
teamstowork.com.

References

1
"The power of many: How companies use
teams to drive superior corporate performance." EY online. 2013. http://www.
ey.com/Publication/vwLUAssets/EY-Thepower-of-many/$FILE/EY-The-power-ofmany.pdf.

"The Top 20 Reasons Startups Fail." CB
Insights. February 2, 2018. https://www.cbinsights.com/research/startup-failure-reasons-top/.
2

3
Cooper, Cary, ed. Research Companion to
the Dysfunctional Workplace (Lancaster, UK:
Lancaster University Management School,
2007).
4
Tabrizi, Behnam. "75% of Cross-Functional
Teams Are Dysfunctional." Harvard Business
Review (June 23, 2015).

Duhigg, Charles. "What Google Learned
From Its Quest to Build the Perfect Team."
The New York Times Magazine. February 28,
2016.
5

6
"20th CEO Survey." PwC. 2017. https://
www.pwc.com/gx/en/ceo-survey/2017/pwcceo-20th-survey-report-2017.pdf.

C OU N T E R P OINT

Helping All Teams
Succeed
By Joseph Bonito

A

rose, Shakespeare said, would
smell as sweet by any other
name. Were he alive today
he might make the same observation
about teams. Over the past 20 years we
(academics, practitioners, and consultants) have cultivated a wide variety on
names to describe this basic working
unit. We have "virtual teams," "extreme
teams," "agile teams," "cross-functional teams," "heavyweight teams," and
"self-directed teams." Some organizations have even transformed team, the

noun, into teaming, the verb. What
would Shakespeare think about that?
Semantics aside, there is no doubt
that when committed individuals join
together to accomplish a superordinate
task, they usually create more economic and intangible value than the same
number of individuals working separately. However, how do teams unlock that
value irrespective of the name that we
give them? Here are five guidelines:
1. Don't lose sight of the individual.
Teams are a collection of individuals
who over time meld into a coherent
unit. Think of military units where
new recruits are socialized to embody the values of their respective
armed services branch. The building block here are individuals and
the unique talents each bring to the
task. How do leaders create the conditions that inspire and motivates
individuals? How do fellow team
members help each other foster a
generosity of spirit that create an
ethos of more givers than takers?
How do you celebrate and blend the
tapestry of differences-styles, skills,
cultures, race, genders? How do you
find the positive deviances where
you can replicate their actions across
the firm? Answering these questions
will help senior leaders, the architects of such teams, to get the best of
both worlds-great individual and
team performance.
2. Create fluidity of leadership. On
many effective teams there is one
named leader ultimately accountable for the outcome of their unit.
However, teams who exhibit servant leadership behaviors (among
team members and leaders) almost
instinctively pass the mantle of
leadership back and forth. It takes
a mature, centered, and "emotionally resonant" leader to create this
type of environment. Over time,
this becomes a normal operating
practice as various team members
step in and out of visible roles of
influence throughout the life cycle
of the team.
3. Minimize self-oriented behavior
and maximize task-oriented and
maintenance-oriented behavior.
Teams have the potential to be real
engines of productivity and employ-

ee engagement, but they need to
be designed and built to reach high
performance. One simple design
step is to make certain the team
creates processes and practices that
accomplish objectives (the hard
and soft metrics, detailed action
plans, with risks identified, etc.) and
maintain effective group behavioral
routines (communication processes,
clarity of decision-making responsibilities, effective escalation and
conflict resolution processes).
4. Practice self-reflection and continuous learning. Self-reflection and
learning must be job #1 from the
beginning-ideally part of a jumpstart event. You can borrow a technique from Gary Klein by holding
"premortems" at a team's launch to
identify and anticipate issues, risks,
and/or potential failures in order
to build this knowledge into the
team's operating routines or work
plan.1
5. Develop trust. Individual trust precedes group trust. And when you
achieve both you have the epoxy
and secret sauce that helps teams
weather the storms that inevitably
arrive during the expected life
cycle of working together. What are
the hallmarks of a team that possesses both individual and group
trust? First, according to researcher and thought leader Amy Edmondson, you should ask yourself:
What is the degree of psychological
safety present within the team?
Second, see if there a congruence
between team member's internal
dialogue and the external dialogue
they express in a team setting?
Third, what is the level of participation and communication among
members versus it being dominated
by individuals of higher status,
power, expertise or income?
The above checklist will go a long
way to help all those who design teams
to create the conditions for them
to flourish within their respective
organizations.
Joseph Bonito is Learning and Leadership
Development Executive at Bank of America,
New York, NY. He can be reached at joseph.
bonito@bankofamerica.com.
VOLUME 41 | ISSUE 2 | SPRING 2018

13


http://www.ey.com/Publication/vwLUAssets/EY-Thepower-of-many/$FILE/EY-The-power-of-many.pdf http://www.ey.com/Publication/vwLUAssets/EY-Thepower-of-many/$FILE/EY-The-power-of-many.pdf http://www.ey.com/Publication/vwLUAssets/EY-Thepower-of-many/$FILE/EY-The-power-of-many.pdf https://www.cbinsights.com/research/startup-failure-reasons-top/ https://www.cbinsights.com/research/startup-failure-reasons-top/ https://www.cbinsights.com/research/startup-failure-reasons-top/ https://www.pwc.com/gx/en/ceo-survey/2017/pwcceo-20th-survey-report-2017.pdf https://www.pwc.com/gx/en/ceo-survey/2017/pwcceo-20th-survey-report-2017.pdf https://www.pwc.com/gx/en/ceo-survey/2017/pwcceo-20th-survey-report-2017.pdf

Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2

From the Executive Editor
From the Guest Editor
Perspectives
Ignition Teams: Rising to the Challenges of Innovation
Challenge Accepted: Managing Polarities to Enhance Virtual Team Effectiveness
Facilitating Trust and Communication in Virtual Teams
Building Entrepreneurial Teams: Talent, Social Capital, and Culture
Organizations That Get Teamwork Right
Team Development: The Power of Debriefing
The Rise of Digital Team Building
Executive Roundtable
In First Person
Linking Theory + Practice
Insight into Action
Leadership Insights
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - Cover1
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - Cover2
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 1
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 2
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 3
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - From the Executive Editor
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 5
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - From the Guest Editor
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 7
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - Perspectives
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 9
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 10
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 11
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 12
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 13
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 14
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 15
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - Ignition Teams: Rising to the Challenges of Innovation
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 17
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 18
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 19
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 20
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 21
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - Challenge Accepted: Managing Polarities to Enhance Virtual Team Effectiveness
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 23
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 24
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 25
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 26
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 27
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 28
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 29
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - Facilitating Trust and Communication in Virtual Teams
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 31
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 32
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 33
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 34
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 35
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - Building Entrepreneurial Teams: Talent, Social Capital, and Culture
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 37
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 38
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 39
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 40
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 41
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - Organizations That Get Teamwork Right
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 43
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 44
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 45
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - Team Development: The Power of Debriefing
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 47
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 48
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 49
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 50
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 51
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - The Rise of Digital Team Building
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 53
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 54
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 55
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - Executive Roundtable
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 57
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 58
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 59
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 60
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 61
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - In First Person
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 63
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 64
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 65
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - Linking Theory + Practice
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 67
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 68
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 69
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - Insight into Action
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 71
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - Leadership Insights
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 73
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 74
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - Cover3
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - Cover4
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