People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 58

person is a jerk but she is so talented."
I cannot stress enough how important
I think the role of HR is in this process.
You can't screw it up. If you are wrong
you will feel the effect for a while-you
can trade people, but that is not best
for the organization. Getting it right is
what's best for the organization.
Amy: Every single person has to understand that you win and lose as an
organization. When you win as a team,
you lose as a team. Nothing irritates me
more than when people say "we" when
a team is winning and "they" when a
team is losing. If you are going to be
on the sidelines reveling in the team's
victories, you better be miserable when
your team loses.
Bob: The one thing I have learned
from being a part of good teams is that
respect and communication are key.
There is no excuse for not having good
communication in an organization.
Kevin Warren: You need to be equally
yoked with each other. That said, poor
communication can hold a team back.
Poor performing organizations do not
communicate at all. The unsuccessful
organizations communicate, but they
end up wasting so much time, energy,
and effort dancing around the point-
dancing while communicating. Great
organizations communicate in a very
direct manner.
Roy: I hear a lot of business leaders
and coaches don't communicate with
their teams. I always like to know what
is going on with my players-if there is
a death in the family, something with
the girlfriend, or a family member has
cancer-if you don't get on issues quick,
10 off games can turn into 20. If they
aren't doing something they should be,
you know why and equally important,
they know your expectations.
Kevin: My parents taught me as a
young child that we all have a limited
amount of time and energy units in
a day. If you cannot communicate on
very difficult issues in a direct and
concise manner, it will cost you energy
and time, and those are the two things
that you cannot purchase regardless of
58

PEOPLE + STRATEGY

your financial situation. That type of
organization will fall behind.
P+S: Sports teams, like business teams,
are made up of people with egos and
attitudes. What's the role of attitude in
a great team?
Roy: Attitude is everything. It is how
your players treat their teammates, how
they carry themselves on and off the
rink. When you are explaining something, are they rolling their eyes or
nodding their head?
Cheryl: We talk a lot about body language to the point where we chart what
we call contact-eye contact and physical contact. It is not just on the court.
How you walk through your place of
work and how you treat people says a
lot about who you are as a person.
Roy: One of the things I started doing
about 10 years ago was to take the guys
camping before the season started.
This was before I knew anything about
their character or attitude. I let them
coordinate everything-the tents, the
sleeping bags, the food, etc. I would
just sit back and observe their behavior and interaction. I learned a lot
about my players on these camping
trips. I have been on a couple of these
where we had the time of our life.
Everyone had a blast. I'd wake up in
the morning with most of the people
still talking and getting to know one
another. One year, the guys didn't
do anything. No one set up tents, no
one fetched firewood, and the team
did not work together. Each guy was
focused on himself. During that trip I
knew we were in trouble. It was one of
the worst seasons we ever had.
Cheryl: What has helped our success has
been the chemistry that has formed when
players were not thinking of themselves,
but instead thinking of what their teammates needed from them. My view is, any
time you are thinking of yourself on the
court, you are doing a disservice to the
team. If you watch our bench, it is a genuine interest in each other. We see real value in connecting as teammates. We think
it makes us hard to beat and difficult to
break. And, it's just way more fun.

Roy: I have one guy that is the epitome
of that kind of attitude-and it's paying
off for him and our team. His name is
John McCarthy. He is the captain of the
team and a great leader, but he only has
six goals all season. Despite only having
six goals, each time I review tape, he is
doing the right thing. He is an extension of the coaches and everyone
knows it. I recently called the coach of
the Olympic team, Tony Granato, who
came to scout him. After seeing John's
attitude on the ice, Tony offered him a
position on the Olympic team.
P+S: Think of the most successful team
you've ever led, at any level. What did
you as a leader do that helped them gel
as a group?
Roy: When we won a championship
in Richmond all the players had fun,
which led to them really caring about
each other. Communication was a big
part of it, and because we were very
clear and had a real vision and system,
we formed an identity built around
how the players cared about each
other.
Cheryl: After the 2010 season we
gathered the captains and I asked
them, "Who stays and who goes? Put
your management hat on. Who do
you want to play with? Who do you
want next to you when times are
tough?" That was uncomfortable
because it meant they were affecting someone's job. That is how we
have formulated things. We don't do
anything we don't have a consensus
on. We don't trade, waive, or add
personnel without them knowing.
I think they have enjoyed that input and I think you get real value
from what they know.
Roy: That team in Richmond battled
for one another. Whether on or off
the ice, they stuck up for one another.
We were the most penalized team in
the league. No one was going to beat
us in the alley. That is how everyone
carried themselves. They lived on
that identity. They had fun together,
practiced hard, and worked hard
off the ice. When it came to a game,
they knew they were never out of it.



Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2

From the Executive Editor
From the Guest Editor
Perspectives
Ignition Teams: Rising to the Challenges of Innovation
Challenge Accepted: Managing Polarities to Enhance Virtual Team Effectiveness
Facilitating Trust and Communication in Virtual Teams
Building Entrepreneurial Teams: Talent, Social Capital, and Culture
Organizations That Get Teamwork Right
Team Development: The Power of Debriefing
The Rise of Digital Team Building
Executive Roundtable
In First Person
Linking Theory + Practice
Insight into Action
Leadership Insights
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - Cover1
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - Cover2
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 1
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 2
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 3
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - From the Executive Editor
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 5
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - From the Guest Editor
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 7
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - Perspectives
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 9
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 10
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 11
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 12
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 13
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 14
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 15
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - Ignition Teams: Rising to the Challenges of Innovation
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 17
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 18
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 19
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 20
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 21
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - Challenge Accepted: Managing Polarities to Enhance Virtual Team Effectiveness
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 23
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 24
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 25
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 26
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 27
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 28
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 29
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - Facilitating Trust and Communication in Virtual Teams
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 31
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 32
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 33
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 34
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 35
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - Building Entrepreneurial Teams: Talent, Social Capital, and Culture
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 37
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 38
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 39
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 40
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 41
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - Organizations That Get Teamwork Right
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 43
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 44
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 45
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - Team Development: The Power of Debriefing
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 47
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 48
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 49
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 50
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 51
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - The Rise of Digital Team Building
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 53
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 54
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 55
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - Executive Roundtable
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 57
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 58
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 59
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 60
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 61
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - In First Person
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 63
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 64
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 65
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - Linking Theory + Practice
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 67
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 68
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 69
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - Insight into Action
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 71
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - Leadership Insights
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 73
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - 74
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - Cover3
People & Strategy Spring 2018 Vol. 41 No. 2 - Cover4
http://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/HRPS/hrps_41_3_2018
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http://www.nxtbook.com/ygsreprints/HRPS/hrps_39_1_2016
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